Ug99

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Resistance to stem rust Ug99 in six bread wheat cultivars maps to chromosome 6DS

More than 80 % of the worldwide wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) area is currently sown with varieties susceptible to the Ug99 race group of stem rust fungus. However, wheat lines Niini, Tinkio, Coni, Pfunye, Blouk, and Ripper have demonstrated Ug99 resistance at the seedling and adult plant stages. We mapped stem rust resistance in populations derived from crosses of a susceptible parent with each of the resistant lines. The segregation of resistance in each population indicated the presence of a single gene. The resistance gene in Niini mapped to short arm of chromosome 6D and was flanked by SSR markers Xcfd49 at distances of 3.9 cM proximal and Xbarc183 8.4 cM distal, respectively. The chromosome location of this resistance was validated in three other populations: PBW343/Coni, PBW343/Tinkio, and Cacuke/Pfunye. Resistance initially postulated to be conferred by the SrTmp gene in Blouk and Ripper was also linked to Xcfd49 and Xbarc183 on 6DS, but it was mapped proximal to Xbarc183 at a similar position to previously mapped genes Sr42 and SrCad. Based on the variation in diagnostic marker alleles, it is possible that Niini and Pfunye may carry different resistance genes/alleles. Further studies are needed to determine the allelic relationships between various genes located on chromosome arm 6DS. Our results provide valuable molecular marker and genetic information for developing Ug99 resistant wheat varieties in diverse germplasm and using these markers to tag the resistance genes in wheat breeding.

Eric E. Lopez-Vera, Sarah Nelson, Ravi P. Singh, Bhoja R. Basnet, Scott D. Haley, Sridhar Bhavani, Julio Huerta-Espino, Beatriz G. Xoconostle-Cazares, Roberto Ruiz-Medrano, Matthew N. Rouse, Sukhwinder Singh
Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Year: 
2014
Volume: 
127
Issue: 
1
Start Page: 
231
Other Page(s): 
239
Expert pick: 
False

Inheritance of resistance to Ug99 stem rust in wheat cultivar Norin 40 and genetic mapping of Sr42

Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, is a devastating disease of wheat. The emergence of race TTKSK (Ug99) and new variants in Africa threatens wheat production worldwide. The best method of controlling stem rust is to deploy effective resistance genes in wheat cultivars. Few stem rust resistance (Sr) genes derived from the primary gene pool of wheat confer resistance to TTKSK. Norin 40, which carries Sr42, is resistant to TTKSK and variants TTKST and TTTSK. The goal of this study was to elucidate the inheritance of resistance to Ug99 in Norin 40 and map the Sr gene(s). A doubled haploid (DH) population of LMPG-6/Norin 40 was evaluated for resistance to the race TTKST. Segregation of 248 DH lines fitted a 1:1 ratio (χ 2 1:1= 0.58, p = 0.45), indicating a single gene in Norin 40 conditioned resistance to Ug99. This was confirmed by an independent F2:3 population also derived from the cross LMPG-6/Norin 40 where a 1:2:1 ratio (χ 21:2:1 = 0.69, p = 0.71) was observed following the inoculation with race TTKSK. Mapping with DNA markers located this gene to chromosome 6DS, the known location of Sr42. PCR marker FSD_RSA co-segregated with Sr42, and simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker BARC183 was closely linked (0.5 cM) to Sr42. A previous study found close linkage between FSD_RSA and SrCad, a temporarily designated gene that also confers resistance to Ug99, thus Sr42 may be the same gene or allelic. Marker FSD_RSA is suitable for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in wheat breeding programs to improve stem rust resistance, including Ug99.

Habibollah Ghazvini, Colin W. Hiebert, Taye Zegeye, Sixin Liu, Mridull Dilawari, Toi Tsilo, James A. Anderson, Matthew N. Rouse, Yue Jin, Tom Fetch
Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Year: 
2012
Volume: 
125
Issue: 
4
Start Page: 
817
Other Page(s): 
824
Expert pick: 
False

Races of Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici with Combined Virulence to Sr13 and Sr9e in a Field Stem Rust Screening Nursery in Ethiopia

North American durum lines, selected for resistance to TTKSK (Ug99) and related races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in Kenya, became susceptible in Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, suggesting the presence of stem rust races that were virulent to the TTKSK-effective genes in durum. The objective of this study was to characterize races of P. graminis f. sp. tritici present in the Debre Zeit, Ethiopia stem rust nursery. Three races of P. graminis f. sp. tritici were identified from 34 isolates: JRCQC, TRTTF, and TTKSK. Both races JRCQC and TRTTF possess virulence on stem rust resistance genes Sr13 and Sr9e, which may explain why many TTKSK-resistant durum lines tested in Kenya became susceptible in Debre Zeit. The Sr9e-Sr13 virulence combination is of particular concern because these two genes constitute major components of stem rust resistance in North American durum cultivars. In addition to Sr9e and Sr13 virulence, race TRTTF is virulent to at least three stem rust resistance genes that are effective to race TTKSK, including Sr36, SrTmp, and resistance conferred by the 1AL.1RS rye translocation. Race TRTTF is the first known race with virulence to the stem rust resistance carried by the 1AL.1RS translocation, which represents one of the few effective genes against TTKSK in winter wheat cultivars in the United States. Durum entries exhibiting resistant to moderately susceptible infection response at the Debre Zeit nursery in 2009 were evaluated for reaction to races JRCQC, TRTTF, and TTKSK at the seedling stage. In all, 47 entries were resistant to the three races evaluated at the seedling stage, whereas 26 entries exhibited a susceptible reaction. These results suggest the presence of both major and adult plant resistance genes, which would be useful in durum-wheat-breeding programs. A thorough survey of virulence in the population of P. graminis f. sp. tritici in Ethiopia will allow characterization of the geographic distribution of the races identified in the Debre Zeit field nursery.

Olivera, P. D.; Jin, Y.; Rouse, M.; Badebo, A.; Fetch, T., Jr.; Singh, R. P.; Yahyaoui, A.
Plant Disease
Year: 
2012
Volume: 
96
Issue: 
5
Start Page: 
623
Other Page(s): 
628
Expert pick: 
False

High-density mapping of a resistance gene to Ug99 from the Iranian landrace PI 626573

Managing wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is imperative for the preservation of global food security. The most effective strategy is pyramiding several resistance genes into adapted wheat cultivars. A search for new resistance sources to Pgt race TTKSK resistance identified a spring wheat landrace, accession PI 626573, as a potentially novel source of resistance. A cross was made between LMPG-6, a susceptible spring wheat line, and PI 626573 and used to develop a recombinant inbred population to map the resistance. Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) of LMPG-6/PI 626573 F2 progeny determined resistance was conferred by a single dominant gene given the provisional designation SrWLR. The BSA identified nine microsatellite (SSR) markers on the long arm of chromosome 2B associated with the resistant phenotype. Fifteen polymorphic SSRs, including the nine identified in the BSA, were used to produce a linkage map of chromosome 2B, positioning SrWLR in an 8.8 cM region between the SSRs GWM47 and WMC332. This region has been reported to contain the wheat stem rust resistance genes Sr9 and SrWeb, the latter conferring resistance to Pgt race TTKSK. The 9,000 marker Illumina Infinium iSelect SNP assay was used to further saturate the SrWLR region. The cosegregating SNP markers IWA6121, IWA6122, IWA7620, IWA8295, and IWA8362 further delimited the SrWLR region distally to a 1.9 cM region. The present study demonstrates the iSelect assay to be an efficient tool to delimit the region of a mapping population and establish syntenic relationships between closely related species.

Jason D. Zurn, Maria Newcomb, Matthew N. Rouse, Yue Jin, Shiaoman Chao, Jinita Sthapit, Deven R. See, Ruth Wanyera, Peter Njau, J. Michael Bonman, Robert Brueggeman, Maricelis Acevedo
Molecular Breeding
Year: 
2014
Expert pick: 
False

Identification of Wheat Gene Sr35 That Confers Resistance to Ug99 Stem Rust Race Group

Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A previously uncharacterized Pgt race, designated Ug99, has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is threatening major wheat production areas. Here, we demonstrate that the Sr35 gene from Triticum monococcum is a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat gene that confers near immunity to Ug99 and related races. This gene is absent in the A-genome diploid donor and in polyploid wheat but is effective when transferred from T. monococcum to polyploid wheat. The cloning of Sr35 opens the door to the use of biotechnological approaches to control this devastating disease and to analyses of the molecular interactions that define the wheat-rust pathosystem.

Cyrille Saintenac, Wenjun Zhang, Andres Salcedo, Matthew N. Rouse, Harold N. Trick, Eduard Akhunov, Jorge Dubcovsky
Science
Year: 
2013
Volume: 
341
Issue: 
6147
Start Page: 
783
Other Page(s): 
786
Expert pick: 
False

The Gene Sr33, an Ortholog of Barley Mla Genes, Encodes Resistance to Wheat Stem Rust Race Ug99

Wheat stem rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, afflicts bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). New virulent races collectively referred to as “Ug99” have emerged, which threaten global wheat production. The wheat gene Sr33, introgressed from the wild relative Aegilops tauschii into bread wheat, confers resistance to diverse stem rust races, including the Ug99 race group. We cloned Sr33, which encodes a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat protein. Sr33 is orthologous to the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Mla mildew resistance genes that confer resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The wheat Sr33 gene functions independently of RAR1, SGT1, and HSP90 chaperones. Haplotype analysis from diverse collections of Ae. tauschii placed the origin of Sr33 resistance near the southern coast of the Caspian Sea.

 

Sambasivam Periyannan, John Moore, Michael Ayliffe, Urmil Bansal, Xiaojing Wang, Li Huang, Karin Deal, Mingcheng Luo, Xiuying Kong, Harbans Bariana, Rohit Mago, Robert McIntosh, Peter Dodds, Jan Dvorak, Evans Lagudah
Science
Year: 
2013
Volume: 
341
Issue: 
6147
Start Page: 
786
Other Page(s): 
788
Expert pick: 
False

Targeted Introgression of a Wheat Stem Rust Resistance Gene by DNA Marker-assisted Chromosome Engineering

Chromosome engineering is a useful strategy for transfer of alien genes from wild relatives into modern crops. However, this strategy has not been extensively used for alien gene introgression in most crops due to low efficiency of conventional cytogenetic techniques. Here, we report an improved scheme of chromosome engineering for efficient elimination of a large amount of goatgrass (Aegilops speltoides) chromatin surrounding Sr39, a gene that provides resistance to multiple stem rust races, including Ug99 (TTKSK) in wheat. The wheat ph1b mutation, which promotes meiotic pairing between homoeologous chromosomes, was employed to induce recombination between wheat chromosome 2B and goatgrass 2S chromatin using a backcross scheme favorable for inducing and detecting the homoeologous recombinants with small goatgrass chromosome segments. Forty recombinants with Sr39 with reduced surrounding goatgrass chromatin were quickly identified from 1,048 backcross progenies through disease screening and molecular marker analysis. Four of the recombinants carrying Sr39 with a minimal amount of goatgrass chromatin (2.87-9.15% of the translocated chromosomes) were verified using genomic in situ hybridization. Approximately 97% of the goatgrass chromatin was eliminated in one of the recombinants, in which a tiny goatgrass chromosome segment containing Sr39 was retained in the wheat genome. Localization of the goatgrass chromatin in the recombinants led to rapid development of three molecular markers tightly linked to Sr39. The new wheat lines and markers provide useful resources for the ongoing global effort to combat Ug99. This study has demonstrated great potential of chromosome engineering in genome manipulation for plant improvement.

Niu,Zhixia; Klindworth,Daryl L.; Friesen,Timothy L.; Chao,Shiaoman; Jin,Yue; Cai,Xiwen; Xu,Steven S.
Genetics
Year: 
2011
Volume: 
187
Issue: 
4
Start Page: 
1011
Other Page(s): 
1021
Expert pick: 
False

The Emergence of Ug99 Races of the Stem Rust Fungus is a Threat to World Wheat Production

Race Ug99 of the fungus Puccinia graminis tritici that causes stem or black rust disease on wheat was first detected in Uganda in 1998. Seven races belonging to the Ug99 lineage are now known and have spread to various wheat-growing countries in the eastern African highlands, as well as Zimbabwe, South Africa, Sudan, Yemen, and Iran. Because of the susceptibility of 90% of the wheat varieties grown worldwide, the Ug99 group of races was recognized as a major threat to wheat production and food security. Its spread, either wind-mediated or human-aided, to other countries in Africa, Asia, and beyond is evident. Screening in Kenya and Ethiopia has identified a low frequency of resistant wheat varieties and breeding materials. Identification and transfer of new sources of race-specific resistance from various wheat relatives is underway to enhance the diversity of resistance. Although new Ug99-resistant varieties that yield more than current popular varieties are being released and promoted, major efforts are required to displace current Ug99 susceptible varieties with varieties that have diverse race-specific or durable resistance and mitigate the Ug99 threat.

Singh,R. P.; Hodson,D. P.; Huerta-Espino,J.; Jin,Y.; Bhavani,S.; Njau,P.; Herrera-Foessel,S.; Singh,P. K.; Singh,S.; Govindan,V.
Phytopathology
Year: 
2011
Volume: 
49
Issue: 
Start Page: 
465.0
Other Page(s): 
481.0

Genetic comparison of Ug99 with selected South African races of Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici

Using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) marker analyses, the genetic structure of selected South African wheat stem rust races was compared with Ug99. SSR analysis divided the population into two distinct groups with 24.5% similarity between them. A local race, UVPgt55 (North American race notation TTKSF), grouped with Ug99 (TTKSK) with a 100% similarity. When AFLP data were included, the same groups were found, but with an increased similarity of 66.7%. Although the SSR data were unable to distinguish between all individual isolates, the AFLP data alone and in combination with the SSR data discriminated between the isolates. The grouping of individual isolates resembled the pathogenicity profile of the different races. On the basis of its similarity with Ug99, it was concluded that UVPgt55 was most probably an exotic introduction into South Africa, whereas the other races specialized locally through mutational adaptation.

Visser,Botma; Herselman,Liezel; Pretorius,Zacharias A.
Molecular Plant Pathology
Year: 
2009
Volume: 
10
Issue: 
2.0
Start Page: 
213.0
Other Page(s): 
222.0

Sources of resistance to stem rust race Ug99 in spring wheat germplasm.

Wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) race TTKSK (Ug99), with virulence to the majority of the world's wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars, has spread from Uganda throughout eastern Africa, Yemen, and Iran. The identification and spread of variants of race TTKSK with virulence to additional stem rust resistance genes has reminded breeders and pathologists of the danger of deploying major resistance genes alone. In order to protect wheat from this rapidly spreading and adapting pathogen, multiple resistance genes are needed, preferably from improved germplasm. Preliminary screening of over 700 spring wheat breeding lines and cultivars developed at least 20 years ago identified 88 accessions with field resistance to Ug99. We included these resistant accessions in the stem rust screening nursery in Njoro, Kenya for two additional seasons. The accessions were also screened with a bulk of North American isolates of P. graminis f. sp. tritici in the field in St. Paul, MN. In order to further characterize the resistance in these accessions, we obtained seedling phenotypes for 10 races of P. graminis f. sp. tritici, including two races from the race TTKSK complex. This phenotyping led to the identification of accessions with either adult-plant or all-stage resistance to race TTKSK, and often North American races of P. graminis f. sp. tritici as well. These Ug99 resistant accessions can be obtained by breeders and introgressed into current breeding germplasm.

Rouse,M. N.; Wanyera,R.; Njau,P.; Jin,Y.
Plant Disease
Year: 
2011
Volume: 
95
Issue: 
6.0
Start Page: 
762.0
Other Page(s): 
766.0

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