stripe rust

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Diversity of Puccinia spp. on wheat, grasses and Berberis spp. in the Himalayan center of diversity of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

The Himalayan and near Himalayan region of Pakistan, China and Nepal was recently identified as the center of diversity of Pst. The Pakistani Himalayan populations were shown to be recombinant and possibly maintained through sexual reproduction on the alternate host, Berberis spp. To examine the role of Berberis spp. in supporting Puccinia spp. in the Himalayan region of Pakistan, 274 pycnial/aecial-infected Berberis leaves and 16 grass samples with uredinial infections were collected in the region from 2012 to 2014. Amplification of infected grass and Berberis spp. samples with EF, ITS region, and β-tubulin primers and subsequent species identification based on comparisons of the sequences to sequences in GenBank identified at least five Puccinia spp. viz., P. brachypodii, putative P. coronata-loli and P. coronati-agrostis, P. striiformis f. sp. dactylis (P. striiformoides), and P. striiformis on Berberis and grasses. This infers a role of Berberis as alternate hosts to Puccinia spp. in the Himalayan region of Pakistan, and in contributing to the overall diversity of these species in the region. Microsatellite characterization of Pst samples collected on wheat in 2013 and 2014 indicated an overall high diversity and recombinant population structure in the region. However, the low frequency of wheat-infecting P. striiformis isolates obtained from Berberis spp. necessitates ongoing investigation.

Ali
The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan
Primary Author Email: 
bioscientist122@yahoo.com

Genetic variation in Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici populations on wheat in Iraq

This study was conducted to detect new races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in Iraq. Trap nurseries were planted in different locations throughout the main wheat growing areas. Stripe rust severities and infection types on each genotype were recorded at different stages of crop development. Yellow rust samples collected from commercial wheat fields at different locations were sent to the Global Rust Center for race analysis. Local adult plant tests indicated virulence for host genes Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9, Yr18, YrA, Yr20, Yr21, Yr27, Yr28, Yr29, and Yr31 at the adult plant stage in Sulaimania, and virulence to Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9, YrSD, YrSP, YrA, Yr21, Yr27, Yr28, and Yr31 at Nineveh. Virulence on lines carrying Yr5, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9, Yr20, Yr21, Yr27, Yr28 and Yr31 were recorded in Babylon and to Yr2, Yr5, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9, Yr18, YrA, Yr20, Yr25, Yr28, Yr29, and Yr31 at Diyala. Of 21 YR samples sent to GRRC for race analysis, cultures were recovered from ten. Two Pst pathotypes (races) were identified; one was virulent to Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr27, and AvS whereas the other had additional virulence to Yr25 (Strubes Dickkopf). None was virulent for Yr5. Both pathotypes were aggressive based on Milus et al. measures.

Al-Maaroof
Sulaimani University, Iraq
Primary Author Email: 
ealmaaroof@yahoo.com

Yield performance and preliminary screening of promising bread wheat genotypes for yellow rust and Septoria tritici blotch in Morocco

Bread wheat is the most important staple crop in Morocco. However, the low national production represents less than 50% of national need. Yellow (stripe) rust (Pst) and Septoria tritici blotch (STB) are the most important foliar diseases limiting bread wheat production in Morocco. The objective of this study was to identify effective sources of resistance to Pst and STB and to select candidate lines displaying high yield and resistance traits. A total of 194 bread wheat accessions provided by ICARDA and CIMMYT were evaluated during 2014 for grain yield and reaction to STB and yellow rust. The field trials were carried out at Douyet station, a key Moroccan rainfed location, and were arranged in a replicated complete block design of 3 replicates. For rust, each entry was scored using the modified Cobb scale when the susceptible check had reached 60S. The Saari Prescott scale was used to score STB reactions. The crop season was characterized by early and late drought associated with high temperatures after flowering. About 50% of accessions (99) showed high yields ranging from 1% to 55% above the highest national check, Arrehane (1.86 t/ha). About 48% (93 accessions) were highly resistant to moderately resistant to yellow rust and about 84% (164 accessions) were resistant to moderately resistant to STB. Overall, about 30% (58 lines) of accessions were high yielding with final disease severities ranging from 0-10% for yellow rust and from resistant to moderately resistant for STB. This group incorporates potentially valuable traits beneficial for our wheat breeding program. QUAIU*2/KINDE was the most promising accession with the highest grain yield (2.9 t/ha) combined with foliar disease resistance. Further multi-environment screening and field evaluations are required before recommending accessions for potential release.

Bennani
National Institute of Agricultural Research, INRA, Morocco
Primary Author Email: 
sahar.bennani@gmail.com

Cytogenetic analysis and molecular mapping of inheritance of resistance in barley to Puccinia striiformis

Plants are generally non-hosts to most diseases. Barley is a host to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei, but is a near non-host to P. striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) and to P. striiformis f. sp. pseudohordei (Psp), which cause stripe rust on wheat and barley grass (Hordeum murinum, H. leporinum), respectively. This study was carried out to determine the inheritance of resistance in barley line 81882/BS1 using the mapping population: 81882/BS1/Biosaline-19. 81882/BS1 is a H. vulgare derivative of cv. Vada, carrying an introgression from H. bulbosum on chromosome 2HS, and Biosaline-19 is susceptible to both Pst and Psp. Phenotyping of F3 lines with Psp culture 981549 and Pst pathotype 134 E16 A+ showed that 81882/BS1 carried two genes for resistance to Psp, and three genes for resistance to Pst. Cytogenetic analysis and molecular mapping were performed to further characterize the resistance of 81882/BS1 to Psp. Joint phenotypic and cytogenetic analysis indicated that at least one of the genes for resistance to Psp was associated with the H. bulbosum introgression previously located on chromosome 2H (Zhang unpublished). Preliminary molecular mapping of 15 non-segregating resistant and 15 non-segregating susceptible lines using >10K DArTseq molecular markers located the second gene on chromosome 1H. This gene was probably contributed by Vada. Further studies are underway to confirm the locations of these two loci by fine mapping.

Elmansour
The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Primary Author Email: 
huda.elmansour@sydney.edu.au

Genetic characterization of stripe rust resistance in a common wheat landrace AWCC618

Stripe rust of wheat was estimated to cause losses of A$127 m annually in Australia. Although stripe rust can be controlled through the use of chemicals, breeding for resistance is considered to be the best means of control. Identification and characterization of diverse sources of resistance is essential to achieve durable stripe rust control. A common wheat landrace AWCC618 showed resistance (IT 1CN) to Australian Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) pathotypes. AWCC618 was crossed with the susceptible genotype Avocet S (AvS) to determine the genetic basis of resistance. Seedling tests on 123 AWCC618/AvS F3 families using Australian Pst pathotype 134 E16 A+ 17+ 27+ indicated monogenic inheritance of resistance (22HR:68SEG:33HS; χ21:2:1=3.34, non-significant at P=0.05 and 2 d.f.). The resistance locus was temporarily named YrAW3. Selective genotyping of eight homozygous resistant (HR) and eight homozygous susceptible (HS) F3 families using the 90K SNP Infinium assay tentatively located YrAW3 on chromosome 6A. The AWCC618/AvS population was advanced to F6 for detailed mapping of the target region. YrAW3 appears to be a new locus. AWCC618 was crossed with three current Australian cultivars to transfer YrAW3 to modern wheat backgrounds. Backcross-derivatives will also be useful for validation of linked markers.

 

Gessese
The University of Sydney Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Primary Author Email: 
mesfin.gessese@sydney.edu.au

Brachypodium distachyon as a model to study nonhost resistance to wheat stripe rust

The model grass Brachypodium distachyon has been used to study nonhost resistance mechanisms to the wheat stripe rust pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f. sp tritici. Numerous B. distachyon accessions were screened with an array of UK and Australian P. striiformis isolates and distinct infection phenotypes identified, ranging from complete resistance to partial susceptibility. Three mapping families were established - BdTR10H x TEK4, BdTR13K x Bd21 and ABR6 x Bd21 - and immunity was dominantly inherited when they were tested with one Australian and three UK isolates. Depending upon the mapping family, between one and three genes for stripe rust resistance were present and designated Yrr1 to Yrr3. Yrr1, which is present in all three families, was effective against all isolates and was fine mapped to a 100 kilobase region containing six candidate genes. Interestingly, no candidate was homologous to a known resistance gene. Yrr2, which is present in the BdTR13K x Bd21 and ABR6 x Bd21 families, is race-specific and was mapped to a 1 megabase region that contains multiple, classic NBS-LRR resistance gene candidates. Yrr3, which is present in the ABR6 x Bd21 family and effective against all isolates, was mapped to a 400 kilobase region also containing NBS-LRR gene candidates. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Yrr1 candidates is underway in Brachypodium for complementation, and in common wheat to test for interspecies transfer of characterized resistance.

Gilbert
CSIRO Plant Industry, Australia
Primary Author Email: 
brian.gilbert@csiro.au

Crosstalk between CBL-CIPK and SA signaling pathways in wheat-Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici pathosystem

Intracellular calcium changes during plant–pathogen interaction are essential early events leading to both local and systemic acquired resistances. Salicylic acid, a critical messenger, is also required for both responses. However, the relationship between the CBL-CIPK and SA signaling pathways during wheat–Pst interaction is unclear. In this study, we isolated seven wheat CBL and 11 wheat CIPK genes and designated them as TaCBL1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9 and TaCIPK2, 5, 7, 9, 10, 14, 15, 17, 23, 31, 32. Some wheat CBLs and CIPKs were functionally characterized. Concurrently, wheat TaNPR1 as a master regulator of SA-mediated host response during Pst infection was functionally characterized. Silencing of TaCBL4, TaCIPK10 and TaNPR1 permitted increased rust development in a wheat variety that was resistant to Pst pathotype CYR23. Decreased levels of salicylic acid (SA) were observed in TaCBL4- and TaCIPK10-silenced wheat plants. Yeast two-hybrid and biomolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) revealed that TaCIPK10 interacted with both TaCBL4 and TaNPR1. These results suggest that a TaCBL4-TaCIPK10-TaNPR1 complex is involved in innate immunity of wheat to Pst.

Guo
State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas and College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, PR China
Primary Author Email: 
guojunwgq@nwsuaf.edu.cn

Diversity of resistance genes in candidate cultivars for planting in the overwintering area of central Shaanxi province, China

China is the largest stripe rust epidemic area in the world. Central Shaanxi, as an important stripe rust overwintering zone for the disease serves as a “bridge” for the pathogen, where early sown wheat infected during the previous autumn provides inoculum for spring epidemics in more eastern regions. Studies of resistance and Yr-gene distribution among local candidate cultivars provide valuable insights into the influence of host genotype on selection of the rust pathogen population. A total of 183 local advanced lines from 2009 to 2011 were tested for seedling resistance with 12 Pst races in the greenhouse, and with mixed races at Tianshui in Gansu province. Gene postulations were based on the seedling response data and molecular markers. Four (2.2%) entries were resistant at all growth stages; 15 (8.2%) were resistant as adult plants; 164 (89.6 %) were susceptible to one or more races at the seedling or adult stages; and 40 were resistant to the currently prevalent races CYR32 and/or CYR33, but susceptible to at least one of the potentially important races Su11-4, Su11-5 and Su11-7, V26/CM42 and V26/Gui22. All entries showed seedling stage susceptibility at Tianshui. Postulated genes included Yr7, Yr9, Yr10, Yr17, Yr18, and Yr24/Yr26. Yr5, Yr15 and Yr61, currently effective against all Chinese races, were not present. Although advanced wheat lines bred in Shaanxi may be diverse our results show that most of them are highly susceptible to one or more prevalent or low frequency races in Shaanxi or adjacent Gansu. This situation indicates that Shaanxi farmers should be using partial adult plant resistances to reduce inoculum levels and hence reduce the amount of primary inoculum spread to more easterly wheat growing areas.

Han
State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas and College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, P. R. China
Primary Author Email: 
Kangzs@nwsuaf.edu.cn

Recent changes in the UK wheat yellow rust and brown rust pathogen populations

Management of the cereal rusts currently relies on the use of fungicides and varietal resistance. Host resistance can be rapidly overcome by mutations in the pathogen population and for this reason virulence surveys are undertaken worldwide to give early warning on any changes. The UK Cereal Pathogen Virulence Survey (UKCPVS) was established in 1967 following an outbreak of yellow rust on the variety Rothwell Perdix. The UKCPVS currently monitors the wheat yellow rust and brown rust pathogen populations as well as the wheat and barley powdery mildew pathogen populations. A watching brief is maintained on barley yellow rust. In 2011 a new Pst race was detected; named the Warrior race after the variety on which it was first found. Initial tests on differential host lines suggested that the race was another stepwise mutation with an added virulence for Yr7 in addition to a combination of virulences to Yr6, Yr9, Yr17 and Yr32. Other characteristics of this race, however, suggested something different from previous race changes with an increase in telial production seen under field conditions. In addition, this new race was seen simultaneously in multiple locations throughout Europe (www.wheatrust.org) in contrast to the more gradual appearance of new variants seen previously. Subsequent genotypic analysis of isolates (Hubbard et al. 2015, Genome Biol. 16:23) demonstrated that the new race was an exotic incursion. Results presented at the meeting will summarize some of the key changes in the pathogen populations, such as the arrival of the Warrior Pst race in 2011 and the re-emergence of the Glasgow race of the brown rust pathogen in 2014. 

 

Holdgate
NIAB, UK
Primary Author Email: 
sarah.holdgate@niab.com

Emerging new virulence gene combinations in the Mexican Pst population

Yellow (stripe) rust continues to be an important disease of wheat in the irrigated EL Bajio region and northwestern Mexico, and in the High Plateau of Central Mexico. Isolate MEX 96.11, virulent to race-specific resistance genes Yr2, Yr3, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9 and Yr27, represented the most prevalent Pst race until 2001 and evolution of new virulences was slow. Several additional R-genes, including a gene in Pollmer triticale, are now defeated. The aggressive Pst race with Yr8 virulence, first detected in the United States in 2000, not only became widespread in Mexico by 2003 but continued to evolve at a more rapid rate with virulence to Yr1 occurring in 2003. However these races did not cause crop losses other than increased levels of head infections in some cultivars. Variants with virulences to Yr17 and Yr31 were detected in 2007 and 2008, respectively. These resistance genes are known to occur in some wheat varieties and breeding materials. 2010 disease data from trap nurseries that included the Avocet isolines and other varieties indicated the existence of virulence for Yr1, 2 (Siete Cerros), 3 (Tatara), 6, 7, 8, 9, 17, 27 and 31 (Rebeca F2000) in different Pst isolates. During the 2014 crop season, an epidemic occurred in farm fields and samples were collected and analyzed in greenhouse tests. Virulence combination V2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 17, 27 and 31 first identified and represented in isolates CEVAMEX14.25 and MEX 14.141, and a similar isolate MEX14.146 virulent to Yr1 were the most frequent. These new virulence combinations caused yield losses in cultivar Nana F2007 grown in the Mexican highlands and Luminaria F2012, released for the irrigated areas of Bajio. Our results indicate a continuing evolution and accumulation of virulences in the aggressive Pst lineage. Determination of the defeated genes in Nana F2007 and Luminaria F2012 is underway.

Huerta-Espino
Campo Experimental Valle de México INIFAP, México
Primary Author Email: 
j.huerta@cgiar.org

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