stripe rust

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Yellow rust in Georgia in 2010-2013

Stripe rust is a worldwide constraint to wheat production. The rust pathogens are assumed to have originated in the Caucasus, from which they disseminated into Western Europe and Asia (Zhukovsky 1965, Euphytica, 14; Stubbs 1985, The Cereal Rusts II). Rust surveys are a useful means to provide information on distribution. More than 400 wheat fields were monitored for rust incidence and severity and for collection of samples at 20 locations in Georgia during 2010-2013. The majority of wheat fields were occupied by Russian cultivars and Bezostaya-1 was the most common, followed by Copper and American cv. Jagger. Yellow rust was the most widely distributed rust, with>65% of fields showing its presence. In 2009 yellow rust incidence was moderate to high. Abundant overwintering inoculum, susceptible cultivars and favorable conditions resulted in severe epidemics in late May and early June 2010. Mean field incidence and severities were 74.8 and 84.6% in the Kakheti zone, and 70 and 68.2% in Kvemo Kartli. Incidence was lower in the following years due to drought and high late spring temperatures. Bezostaya 1 and Jagger showed moderately susceptible reactions to all three rust, but Copper was moderately resistant. Accessions of Georgian endemic species T. carthlicum, T. timopheevi, T. macha, T. georgicum and T. monococcum were resistant to all three rusts.

Natsarishvili
Institute of Phytopathology and Biodiversity, Batumi Shota Rustaveli State University,Georgia
Primary Author Email: 
ketinatsarishvili@yahoo.com

Association mapping of resistance to stripe rust in a globally diverse panel of wheat accessions

Effective control of stripe rust (YR) requires deployment of resistant cultivars. Adult plant resistance (APR) is preferred over all-stage resistance because of its putatively durable nature. Discovery of new sources of resistance is a priority to combat rapidly evolving Pst races. Genebanks contain untapped genetic diversity that likely harbor novel resistance genes. We examined a diverse panel of 300 lines sourced from the Vavilov Institute, including landraces, cultivars and breeding lines from 28 countries. The most virulent Pst pathotype in Australia (134 E16 A+,Yr17+,Yr27) was used for all experiments, where YR reactions were determined on seedlings in a greenhouse and on adult plants in a field disease nursery. A total of 54% of accessions displayed all-stage resistance and 33% displayed moderate to high levels of APR. Accessions were genotyped using the DArTseq genotyping platform and using an association mapping approach we identified genomic regions associated with YR resistance. These were aligned with previously reported QTL and cataloged resistance genes on a consensus map. This enabled identification of novel genomic regions. Accessions carrying high levels of APR were screened using markers linked to well-known APR genes (i.e. Yr18, Yr29 and Yr46). Twenty two accessions carrying potentially novel sources of APR to YR were identified. Our current efforts are aimed at further characterizing and validating these genetic resources against a wide array of pathotypes and environments around Australia.

Ng
The University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Australia
Primary Author Email: 
wei.ng4@uq.net.au

Characterization of a stripe rust resistance gene in wheat landrace AUS 27969 from the Watkins collection

Landraces and wild relatives of wheat are rich repositories of new rust resistance genes. Landraces are preferred over wild relatives for the absence of deleterious effects associated with large alien segments. A common wheat landrace, AUS 27969 (ex Portugal), from the Watkins Collection was resistant under field conditions and produced seedling infection type (IT) 2C against the widely virulent Australian Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) pathotype 134 E16 A+ Yr17+ Yr27+. AUS 27969 was crossed with the susceptible genotype Avocet S (AvS) and the distribution of F3 lines conformed to monogenic segregation [40 non-segregating resistant (NSR), 93 segregating (Seg), and 37 non-segregating susceptible (NSS); ?2 = 1.61, P2d.f. >0.05] when tested with the same pathotype at the seedling stage. The population is currently being selfed to F6. DNA from NSR and NSS lines will be sent for high throughput analysis to identify the genomic region carrying the resistance gene. Resistance-linked SNPs will be mapped on the F6 RIL population. The resistance gene will be backcrossed into modern Australian wheat backgrounds.

Kandiah
The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Primary Author Email: 
pakeeranthan.kandiah@sydney.edu.au

Combining population genetic structure and upper air flow trajectories to reveal the origin and migration of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

Pathogen migration is a source of new pathogens and pathotypes to a particular region. Studies on origin and migration of pathogens were difficult in the past, but DNA sequence data and new analytical approaches now enable us to analyze population genetic structures from which we can determine possible migration routes. The Himalayan and neighboring regions (Gansu, China) were earlier suggested as putative centers of origin for Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) and sampling locations for Chinese isolates were strongly focused in South Gansu. Previous field surveys indicated that Yunnan might be the primary source of the Gansu population in China. Using samples collected in 2008 and 2011 we compared the Pst population structures of Yunnan and south Gansu for SNPs in housekeeping genes Cdc2, Ef-1? and Mapk1, and the trajectories of upper air flow during wheat growing seasons from 2005 to 2013. The ancestral haplotype was detected in the Yunnan population, which had higher a mutation rate than the Gansu population, but the latter contained more recombination events. Both populations were highly diverse. There was massive air flow between Yunnan and Gansu with trajectories being mainly from Yunnan to Gansu. We propose a putative dispersal route of Pst from Yunnan to South Gansu, making Yunnan the center of origin for Pst in China, whereas Gansu is a secondary center of origin. It is proposed that Pst migrates from South Asia to Yunnan under the influence of westerly weather patterns, and subsequently spreads to other parts in China. DNA sequence comparisons should be undertaken to compare Pst populations of South Asia and China in order to confirm these hypotheses.

Li
Institute of Agricultural Environment and Resources, Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China
Primary Author Email: 
limingju1996@hotmail.com

Gene-assisted selection using a pedigree dissection approach to identify Yr genes in wheat breeding materials

Yellow rust is the most dangerous of the wheat rusts worldwide. Disease management involves breeding and fungicide application, with the former being more cost effective and environmentally acceptable. Despite the release of numerous yellow rust resistant cultivars in many countries, new aggressive strains inevitably overcome the resistances in a zigzag or ‘boom and bust’manner. For example, Chamran (Attila-50-Y), released in 1997 in Iran, immediately became the most popular cultivar nationally. In 2012-2013, a new aggressive Pst strain overcame the resistance in Chamran as well as Vee/Nac (an early maturity line suitable for the wheat-maize cropping system) in Khuzestan, a major wheat-producing region in the southwest of the country. Evaluations of wheat germplasm at the Safiabad Agricultural Research Center (North Khuzestan) identified 17 completely or partially resistant lines. Pedigree analyses of resistant lines identified Batavia, Genaro 81, Opata, Pastor, Trap and Yaco as possible sources of resistance. Genotype information of these cultivars obtained from the http://wheatpedigree.net/ database indicated the presence of Yr33, Yr30+Yr18 and Yr31 in Batavia, Opata and Pastor, respectively. Genaro 81, Trap and Yaco carry Yr18. Currently, F2 populations of 34 crosses of 17 resistant lines to locally adapted cultivars Chamran and Vee/Nac are undergoing field selection in a nursery inoculated with the 2012-2013 aggressive race. The progenies of selected plants will undergo further testing and selected homozygous F3 lines will be genotyped for markers associated with Yr18 (Xgwm295-7D), Yr30 (flanking markers Xgwm533.1 - Xgwm493-3B), Yr31 (Xgwm630/Xgwm374-2B (Lr13/Lr23)) and Yr33 (flanking markers Xgwm111 - Xgwm437-7D).

Ghaffary
Safiabad Agricultural Research Center, Iran
Primary Author Email: 
Mahmoud.tabib@gmail.com

Identifying quantitative trait loci for high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in six mapping populations of wheat

High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust in wheat has proven to be durable. Molecular markers tightly linked to HTAP resistance offer an alternative to phenotypic selection and are useful for pyramiding HTAP resistance genes with other types of resistance. This study assessed HTAP resistance in six diverse mapping populations derived from four types of crosses: 1. Resistant × Susceptible, IDO444 × Rio Blanco (winter wheat RILs) and UI Silver × Shaan 89150 (winter wheat DH lines); 2. Moderately Resistant × Resistant, UI Platinum × SY Capstone (spring wheat DH lines) and UI Stone × IDO686 (spring wheat RILs); 3. Moderately Resistant × Moderately Resistant, UI Stone × Alturas (spring wheat RILs); and 4. Moderately Susceptible × Moderately Susceptible, IDO835 × Moreland (winter wheat, DHLs). Eight QTL significantly associated with HTAP resistance were earlier identified in the IDO444 x Rio Blanco RIL population, including three major QTL (QYrid.ui-2B.1, QYrid.ui-2B.2, and QYrid.ui-4A) and five minor QTL (QYrid.ui-1A, QYrid.ui-3B.1, QYrid.ui-3B.2, QYrid.ui-4B, and QYrid.ui-5B) (Chen et al. 2012, Mol Breeding 29:791–800). These QTL are being validated and novel QTL are being identified in the other five populations. The current study used elite × elite crosses; therefore, the identified QTL may have application in selecting lines with combinations of stripe rust resistance and other superior agronomic traits and perhaps for release as new cultivars.

Chen
University of Idaho, USA
Primary Author Email: 
jchen@uidaho.edu

Identification of stripe rust resistant selections from wheat landraces currently under cultivation in Turkey

The International Winter Wheat Improvement Program (Turkey-CIMMYT-ICARDA) conducted a national inventory of wheat landraces in Turkey from 2009-2014. The material in this study were landraces from 10 provinces (Afyon, Aksaray, Burdur, Eskişehir, Karaman, Konya, Kütahya, Nevşehir, Niğde and Uşak) collected in 2009-2010, head-rowed and increased for evaluation in a yield trial in 2012-2013 in Konya province (200 entries, 2 replicates). Drought tolerant cultivars Karahan-99 and Gerek-79 served as checks, each repeated 8 times. The average yıeld of selections from the landraces was 2.95 t/ha compared to 3.7 t/ha for Karahan-99 and 2.8 t/ha for Gerek-79. The mean yıeld of the ten best landrace selections was 3.9 t/ha. In separate disease tests 5% and 11% of selections from the landraces were resistant and moderately resistant to stripe rust, respectively. Four landraces selections (Sahman-Aksaray, Kırmızı Buğday-Uşak, Kobak-Kütahya, Koca Buğday-Burdur) had higher grain yield than Karahan-99 and Gerek-79 and were resistant to stripe rust. There is some likelihood that this resistance is of a durable nature. The selected lines can be used in breeding programs targeting improved dryland performance while improving durability of stripe rust resistance in modern cultivars.

Ozer
Bahri Dağdaş International Agricultural Research Institute, Turkey
Primary Author Email: 
emel.ozer@gthb.gov.tr

Divergent evolution of the Jackie pathotype of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici between Australia and New Zealand

Based on historical data, Australia and New Zealand (NZ) form a single epidemiological unit for cereal rusts. The dominant westerly wind pattern produces a one-way pathway of pathogen movement from Australia to NZ. Until 2002, pathotype analysis of cereal rust pathogens for NZ was conducted at the University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute. Over that time, windborne dispersal of members of the Pst 104 pathotype lineage to New Zealand was confirmed. Historically, pathotypes of Pst introduced to New Zealand have taken different evolutionary pathways to their Australian relatives, including a higher diversity of step-wise mutant isolates, often with different virulence profiles. A preliminary screen of Pst in NZ was conducted in January 2013 and a broader survey was conducted in 2014. Initial results confirmed that the Australian pathotype (pt.) 134 E16 A+ YrJ+ had crossed to NZ. The designation “YrJ+was allocated to indicate virulence for an unidentified, probably rye-derived, resistance gene in the Australian triticale cultivar ‘Jackie’. The divergent evolution of this pathotype in NZ relative to Australia is of interest. In NZ, this pathotype subsequently acquired virulence for Yr10 to produce pt. 150 E16 A+ YrJ+. In Australia, Yr10 virulence had previously evolved in pt. 134 E16 A+, the progenitor of pt. 134 E16 A+ YrJ+. Only two mutational derivative pathotypes have evolved from pt. 134 E16 A+ YrJ+ in Australia. The first acquired virulence for an adult plant resistance gene in another triticale variety, ‘Tobruk’, and the second acquired virulence for Yr27. Despite being present in both Australia and NZ, pt. 134 E16 A+ Yr17+ has dominated the Australian Pst population whereas in NZ the predominant pathotype appears to be 134 E16 A+ YrJ+. Since the rust resistance genotypes of NZ varieties are poorly characterised, no conclusions can yet be reached as to whether this difference in dominant pathotype is due to selection or chance.

Cuddy
New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, Australia
Primary Author Email: 
will.cuddy@dpi.nsw.gov.au

Avirulence/virulence phenotypes of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici samples collected from wheat in Ecuador, 2001-2014

Stripe rust is the most important disease of wheat in Ecuador. Knowledge of race diversity of the pathogen population is limited. Here we present avirulence/virulence phenotypes found in Pst samples collected from wheat between 2001 and 2014. A total of 30 isolates from the Ecuadorian highlands were tested on 15 near-isogenic wheat lines carrying single resistance genes; 21 races were identified. Lines with Yr2, Yr3, Yr26 and Yr27 were not tested in some years. Virulences to Yr1, Yr6, Yr7 and Yr9 were the most frequent (over 70%) in all years, followed by virulence to Yr17 (67%) and Yr27 (53%). Virulence to Yr8 was not found in 2013 and 2014. Virulence to Yr24/Yr26 was present in each year except 2014, although at a low level. Virulence to Yr10 was low. There were some unconfirmed discrepancies from a perfect association of virulences to Yr24/Yr26 and Yr10. Virulence to YrSP increased up to 2013, but was absent in 2014. There was no virulence to Yr5 and Yr15. Despite limited sampling, a diverse population of Pst seems to be present in Ecuador, with virulence for most resistance genes being present. Based on these analyses resistance to Pst in Ecuador could be achieved with Yr5 and Yr15, together with Yr24Yr26, and perhaps YrSP. One possibility for the high pathogenic variation might be sexual recombination on one or more of the 32 Berberis species reported in Ecuador. This needs to be examined along with more intensive sampling from wheat and analysis of the actual resistance genes present in current cultivars.

Ordonez
Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Ecuador
Primary Author Email: 
meordonez@puce.edu.ec

Pst pathotypes and Yr gene postulation in Tunisian wheat

Yellow rust is a widely distributed wheat disease, that is more damaging in cooler, temperate regions. Epidemics have increased worldwide due to spread of aggressive high temperature tolerant strains PstS1/S2 that reached North Africa and southern France in 2004 and the widely virulent exotic Warrior race that spread in Western Europe in 2011. Resistant varieties are effective solutions to reduce the use of pesticides. However, races of the pathogen quickly overcome resistance genes. Therefore, selection of varieties with durable resistance to yellow rust is paramount for protection of both bread wheat and durum. To conduct a genetic control strategy, it is essential to study the pathotype dynamics and the resistance genes in wheat. We identified the pathotypes using the European and world differential sets that discriminate between 23 avirulence/virulence factors as well as simple sequence repeat (SSR) diversity among 20 Pst isolates collected in Tunisia in 2014. In addition, we postulated resistance genes in 28 Tunisian varieties and accessions at the seedling stage in order to identify the resistance diversity. Race 239 E175V17 was involved in the 2014 epidemic in Tunisia. Genetic analysis revealed that this race is exotic and distinct from the Northwestern European and Mediterranean groups, previously present in Tunisia. Resistance gene postulation indicated the presence of Yr3, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9+Yr4, and Yr25 in Tunisian varieties and accessions. Durum varieties Khiar and Salim, and bread wheat variety Tahent, were resistant to the local Northwestern European and Western Mediterranean pathotypes as well as the Warrior race. These varieties are thus short-term measures to address the yellow rust problem in Tunisia. Gene identifications will be confirmed by molecular and pedigree analyses of the accessions.Yellow rust is a widely distributed wheat disease, that is more damaging in cooler, temperate regions. Epidemics have increased worldwide due to spread of aggressive high temperature tolerant strains PstS1/S2 that reached North Africa and southern France in 2004 and the widely virulent exotic Warrior race that spread in Western Europe in 2011. Resistant varieties are effective solutions to reduce the use of pesticides. However, races of the pathogen quickly overcome resistance genes. Therefore, selection of varieties with durable resistance to yellow rust is paramount for protection of both bread wheat and durum. To conduct a genetic control strategy, it is essential to study the pathotype dynamics and the resistance genes in wheat. We identified the pathotypes using the European and world differential sets that discriminate between 23 avirulence/virulence factors as well as simple sequence repeat (SSR) diversity among 20 Pst isolates collected in Tunisia in 2014. In addition, we postulated resistance genes in 28 Tunisian varieties and accessions at the seedling stage in order to identify the resistance diversity. Race 239 E175V17 was involved in the 2014 epidemic in Tunisia. Genetic analysis revealed that this race is exotic and distinct from the Northwestern European and Mediterranean groups, previously present in Tunisia. Resistance gene postulation indicated the presence of Yr3, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9+Yr4, and Yr25 in Tunisian varieties and accessions. Durum varieties Khiar and Salim, and bread wheat variety Tahent, were resistant to the local Northwestern European and Western Mediterranean pathotypes as well as the Warrior race. These varieties are thus short-term measures to address the yellow rust problem in Tunisia. Gene identifications will be confirmed by molecular and pedigree analyses of the accessions.

Hamza
National Institute of Agronomy, Tunisia
Primary Author Email: 
rebai.hamza13@gmail.com

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