stem rust

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Mapping resistance in wheat landraces to the Ug99 race group of the stem rust pathogen

Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a threat to wheat production worldwide. To manage this important disease, new sources of genetic resistance are needed and common wheat landraces are a potential source of such resistance. Landrace accessions from the USDA-ARS National Small Grains Collection were evaluated for seedling resistance to the Ug99 race group. To identify accessions most likely to carry novel resistance genes, a bulked segregant analysis (BSA) approach was used. Seven resistant accessions were crossed to a susceptible parent line and F3 families were tested against Pgt race TTKSK. The resistant plants were identified and grouped into two bulks per population. The bulks, along with the parents and F1 progeny, were genotyped with the 90K wheat iSelect SNP genotyping platform. Four of the populations appeared to segregate in a 1:1 phenotypic resistant/susceptible ratio, one in a 1:2 ratio, and two in 1:3 ratios. However, chi squared tests indicated the ratios were statistically the best fit for only two of the 1:1 segregating populations and one of the 1:3 segregating populations. Initial BSA results indicate the markers associated with reduced stem rust infection are located on wheat chromosomes 1DL and 2B. These mapping populations are being advanced for further evaluation to ascertain if novel resistance to the Ug99 stem rust race group is present.

Neugebauer
USDA-ARS
Co-authors: 
Ebrahiem Babiker, Tyler Gordon, Sam Stoxen, Matthew Rouse, Yue Jin, Shiaoman Chao, John Bonman
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Kerri
Displayed onsite?: 
No

Yield loss due to stem rust in wheat varieties with different types of resistance

Notwithstanding the re-emergence and importance of wheat stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), the degree of protection provided by different types of resistance has not been carefully investigated in contemporary studies. Seven wheat entries were exposed to stem rust infection and fungicide response in a split-plot field experiment over two seasons. Severe epidemics of Pgt race PTKST, generated by frequent inoculation of spreader rows within and around the trial, developed in both years. By comparing grain yield in rusted and fungicide sprayed plots, varieties SC Nduna (Sr31) and SC Stallion (Sr2+Sr31) sustained mean yield losses of 28.8% and 20.7%, respectively. From entries with adult plant resistance (APR), Kingbird recorded a loss of 10.1% as compared to W1406 (19.5%) and W6979 (15.4%). Grain yield of SC Sky which exhibits all stage resistance (ASR) was reduced by 6.4% over the two seasons. The highest yield loss (47.9%) was measured for Line 37, the susceptible control. A significant linear relationship occurred between percentage yield loss and AUDPC in both seasons (R2=0.99 and 0.83). This study showed that not all sources of APR to stem rust provided the same level of protection under severe disease pressure. In the absence of virulence for SC Sky, ASR conferred the most protection.

Soko
University of the Free State and Seed-Co
Keywords: 
Co-authors: 
Vicky Coetzee, Cornelia M. Bender, Renée Prins, Zacharias A. Pretorius
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Tegwe
Displayed onsite?: 
No

Pathogenic variation of Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici in Iran during the 2016-2017 season

In recent years, wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici, has been reconsidered in Iran due to its prevalence and the emergence of the dangerous Ug99 race. This study was conducted to understand pathogenic variation in the population of P. graminis f.sp. tritici, detection of effective genes, and identification of resistance in Iranian commercial wheat cultivars or advanced lines, by planting stem rust trap nurseries under natural disease infection in several regions of Iran during the 2016-2017 cropping season. The trap nursery in each location included 48 wheat lines each carrying a single gene of stem rust (Sr) resistance, seven lines each carrying Sr multigenes, eight additional lines to confirm four Sr genes, 149 commercial wheat cultivars or advanced lines from Iran, plus several susceptible checks. The percentage leaf area affected (disease severity) and infection type were recorded at adult plant stage when disease was well developed on flag leaves of susceptible checks. Results showed presence of virulence for several Sr genes in one or more locations. However, the single genes of Sr13, Sr23, Sr24, and two complex genes of Sr7a+Sr6+Sr12 and Sr6+Sr24+Sr36+Sr1RS-Am were still effective against stem rust in all locations. The results of evaluations of commercial wheat cultivars or advanced lines showed that approximately 16% the genotypes tested including wheat cultivars Gonbad, Shiroudi, Chamran-2, Baharan, Dena, Karkheh, and Arya were resistant in all locations.

Malihipour
Seed & Plant Improvement Institute (SPII), AREEO, Karaj, Iran
Resistance Gene Tags: 
Co-authors: 
Ramin Roohparvar, Safarali Safavi, Gholamhossein Ahmadi
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
geographic_area: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Ali
Displayed onsite?: 
No

A new stem rust resistance locus detected in wheat variety Yalta

To monitor evolution and pathogenic variability of wheat stem rust pathogen (Puccina graminis f. sp. tritici) in Australia, the Australian Cereal Rust Control program regularly conducts national annual surveys. Recently, we detected a new pathotype 34-1,2,5,7 (culture # 661) virulent on stem rust resistance genes Sr5, Sr6, Sr7b, Sr9g, Sr11, Sr15 and Sr17. Although virulent on Sr11, this pathotype produced a low infection type (IT 22+C/X) on the Sr11-differential genotype Yalta, indicating that Yalta carries an uncharacterised resistance (SrY) in addition to Sr11. To characterize SrY, we screened a RIL population Yalta/W2691 (104 lines) with two pathotypes: 21-0 (avirulent on Sr11 or AA) and the newly identified 34-1,2,5,7 (virulent on Sr11 but avirulent on SrY or BB). Yalta produced low infection types, "1C" and "22+C/X" with pathotypes 21-0 and 34-1,2,5,7, respectively, whereas W2691 was susceptible to both pathotypes. The population segregated for AA/aa (35 Res: 69 Sus) and BB/bb (36 Res: 68 Sus) loci with pathotypes 21-0 and 34-1,2,5,7, respectively. The observed segregation (AA/aa and BB/bb) however failed to fit with predicted single gene 1:1 model (P<0.05) with both pathotypes. Joint segregation analysis (AA/aa vs BB/bb) also significantly deviated (P<0.01) from 1:1:1:1 (AABB:AAbb:aaBB:aabb) genetic model. It appears that population is skewed towards susceptibility in each case either by chance or differential gametic transmission as reported previously in progenies derived from crosses involving variety Yalta. The segregation pattern (AABB and aabb) with two pathotypes was, however, highly coupled apart from 13 lines, of which, 6 lines (AAbb) were susceptible with 21-0 and resistant with 34-1,2,5,7, and 7 lines (aaBB) resistant with 21-0 and susceptible with 34-1,2,5,7, showing that the two loci are linked (?2 linkage = 76.9; P<0.001) and located very close to each other. If that is the case, it may imply that SrY is common in wheats carrying Sr11. Cultivar Charter has been used in India to differentiate pathotypes virulent for Sr11, suggesting that Charter also carries a second stem rust locus (SrC) possibly corresponding with SrY. Further studies and mapping work are underway to determine the genetic relationship between SrY, SrC and Sr11.

Singh
University of Sydney
Co-authors: 
Robert,Park, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Davinder

Stem rust resistance in durum wheat

Our research objective is to identify new resistance genes in durum wheat that are effective against TTKSK and other significant stem rust pathogen races that could be utilized in durum breeding. We characterized 8,000 accessions for stem rust response in the field (Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, and St. Paul, MN). Accessions with resistant to moderately resistant responses in multiple field evaluations were evaluated at the seedling stage for resistance to races TTKSK, TRTTF, TTTTF, JRCQC, TKTTF, and six representative U.S. races. We identified 438 durum accessions resistant to moderately resistant in all field evaluations. Among the field-resistant accessions, 273 were resistant to all races used in seedling evaluations. Accessions susceptible at the seedling stage are being evaluated for the presence of adult plant resistance genes. The highest frequencies of resistant lines include landraces from East and North Africa (Ethiopia and Egypt) and advanced breeding lines and cultivars from North America (Mexico and USA). DNA markers will be performed to identify the presence of durum stem rust resistance genes, including Sr13, Sr8155B1, Sr11, and Sr8a. Nineteen resistant accessions were selected to investigate the genetics of TTKSK and TRTTF resistance. Results from evaluating F2 and F2:3 generations from biparental crosses revealed that resistance to race TTKSK was conferred mostly by one or two genes with dominant and recessive actions. Additional resistance genes were identified when populations were evaluated against race TRTTF. A bulk segregant analysis approach is being used to map the resistance in selected lines using the 90K SNP platform.

Olivera
University of Minnesota
Co-authors: 
Ayele Badebo, Worku Bulbula, Matthew Rouse, Yue Jin
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Abstract Tags: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Pablo
Author Tag: 

Large scale wheat stem rust outbreaks in Western Siberia / Northern Kazakhstan in 2015-2017

Short season, high latitude spring wheat is grown on 7 million ha in Western Siberia and 10 million ha in Northern Kazakhstan. Despite relatively low wheat yields (1.5 t/ha), the region is extremely important for regional and global food security. Leaf rust dominates, occurring three years out of five, especially in favorable years with higher rainfall. Since 2010, stem rust has been observed at an increasing number of sites. The first large-scale stem rust outbreak occurred in 2015 and affected about 0.5-1 million ha in Omsk, Western Siberia. In 2016, 2 million ha were affected in the Omsk and Altay regions, while 1 million ha in the Kostanay and Northern Kazakhstan regions were affected in 2017. Estimated yield losses reached 25-35% each year. Factors associated with the outbreaks included: higher rainfall in late June and July; cultivation of susceptible varieties; and an increased area planted to winter wheat, which serves as a source of inoculum. Sampling and race analysis revealed a diverse pathogen population, indicative of a sexual recombination. A total of 51 races were identified from 31 samples taken in 2015 and 2016. All races were avirulent on Sr31. The majority of varieties released and cultivated in the region are susceptible to stem rust and require replacing. A recent study of 150 local resistant varieties and breeding lines indicated that the genetic basis of resistance was limited to Sr25, Sr31, Sr36, Sr6Ai, Sr6Ai#2, and additional unknown major genes. Adult-plant resistance to stem rust was observed in less than 20% of the germplasm. The potential impact of these large stem rust outbreaks on other wheat growing regions is being investigated by analyzing spore wind dispersal patterns. Further research is required to understand and mitigate the sudden appearance of stem rust as a disease of economic importance.
Study at Omsk State Agrarian University was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project No. 16-16-10005).

Shamanin
Omsk State Agricultural University, Omsk, Russia
Co-authors: 
Elena Salina, Yuriy Zelenskiy, Alma Kokhmetova, Mehran Patpour, Mogens Hovmøller, Pablo Olivera, Les Szabo, Yue Jin, Marcel Meyer, Chris Gilligan, Matthew Hort, Dave Hodson, Alexey Morgunov
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
geographic_area: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Vladimir
Displayed onsite?: 
No

Incidence and severity of rust diseases in Novosibirsk region, Western Siberia, Russia

Stem and leaf rusts affect the winter and spring wheat in the Novosibirsk region. During 2008-2017 leaf rust incidence was generally moderate, from 20 to 40%. A leaf rust outbreak occurred in 2015 when incidence increased up to 80%. Leaf rust severity on the 'Thatcher' NILs ranged from immune or resistant to highly susceptible host response with maximum severity of 90S. Lines carrying genes Lr17, Lr18, Lr24, Lr29, Lr35, Lr37, Lr44, and LrW remained almost free of infection for the whole time of inspection. Genes Lr12, Lr13, Lr28, Lr34, and Lr38 exhibited moderate resistance but they did not provide sufficient level of resistance in favorable conditions. Since race-specific genes Lr24 and Lr29 are still effective in the neighboring Novosibirsk and Omsk regions, they might be recommended for breeding purposes in Western Siberia.
In 2016 stem rust was more prevalent and widespread in the region than ever before. Disease incidence ranged between 4.5 - 60% with high severity up to 80S in six fields from seven observed locations. The 4th ISRTN and varieties carrying Sr31 of West Siberian germplasm were assessed in field trials to monitor the virulence of the local population. There was no virulence to Sr9b, Sr9e, Sr20, Sr28, Sr29, Sr33, Sr39, Sr40, SrWld, Sr2 complex. Possible virulence to Sr6, Sr11, Sr12, Sr13, Sr17, Sr24, Sr25, Sr30, Sr31, Sr35, Sr38, Sr44, Sr57 was observed with low frequency. Entries genotyped for gene Sr31 were scored as MS and S. However, follow up race analysis work is needed to determine the actual stem rust races present and confirm the suspected possible observed virulence on Sr31.

Skolotneva
The Federal Research Center Institute of Cytology and Genetics, The Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Resistance Gene Tags: 
Co-authors: 
Vyacheslav Piskarev, Irina Leonova, Ekaterina Bukatich, Elena Salina
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Ekaterina
Displayed onsite?: 
No

Towards delivery of suitably high yielding, stable, and rust resistant wheat genotypes in the stem rust hotspots of Kenya

Emergence of Pgt race Ug99 and rapid proliferation of lineal highly virulent races imminently threaten Kenyan wheat. Devastating epidemics have led to huge losses among smallholder farmers who invariably are unable to spray appropriately and in situations where susceptible varieties are grown. To combat stem rust, the Kenya wheat improvement program seeks to release high yielding stable genotypes with suitable levels of disease resistance. Moreover, detection of genotypes that are adapted to rain-fed environments is an overarching objective. Six hundred and seventeen genotypes from various CIMMYT nurseries (PCBW, EPCBW, PCHPLUS, and 9th SRRSN) were selected based on plant type and reaction to stem rust at Njoro. The reconstituted nursery-KSRON, was sown in the main season of 2016 at Njoro and Timau for further evaluation. Forty red grained lines depicting R-MR infection types, severity of 30% or less, and average Thousand Kernel Weight of >40g were then selected to constitute a yield trial. At each of eight diverse environments, trials also comprising four commercial varieties as checks, were designed in RCBD, three replicates laid out in contiguous array of 8 rows x 10 m plots. Genotype (G), Environment (E) and GE interactions effects were estimated by fitting the AMMI model to yield data, supported by a biplot visualization of the results. Analysis revealed significant (P ?0.01) genotype (G), environment (E), and GE interactions. The first three principal components (PC) explained ~78% of the observed variation. Environment was the predominant source contributing over 85% to total sum of squares. The biplot pointed to at least four environments that were highly correlated. By classifying genotypes based on Shukla's stability variance and Kang's stability rating, six genotypes (R1402, R1411, R1424, R1481, R1484, and R1486) were deemed high yielding and stable, and thus suitable candidates for further testing through the release pipeline.

Macharia
Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization
Keywords: 
Co-authors: 
Ruth Wanyera, Bernard Otukho, Bernice Waweru, Hellen Wairimu, Sridhar Bhavani
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
geographic_area: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Godwin
Displayed onsite?: 
No

Detection of race-specificity of adult plant resistance to wheat stem rust

Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a significant disease limiting wheat yield in Ethiopia. Wheat varieties such as 'Digalu' with single major-effect stem rust resistance genes have not exhibited durable resistance in Ethiopia. Identifying wheat lines with adult plant resistance (APR) has been proposed as a strategy to select for durable resistance. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that APR to stem rust is non-race-specific. We selected 31 wheat lines (including 10 durum and 21 bread wheat lines) that were susceptible as seedlings to Pgt races TTKSK, TKTTF, and TRTTF. These 31 wheat lines and Digalu were evaluated in 2014 and 2015 at the Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia. The lines were planted in 1 m rows and replicated twice in separate single-race-inoculated nurseries. The three single-race nurseries inoculated with Pgt races TTKSK, TKTTF, and TRTTF were separated by at least 100 m and included selective spreaders. Plot yield, thousand kernel weight (TKW), and visual disease responses were measured for each plot. We used a least-squared means test to detect differences in coefficient of infection and TKW of each line across paired race comparisons. Lines 'Park', 'CI11469', and 'CI12818' displayed significantly different coefficient of infections between races TTKSK and TRTTF. For CI11469 and CI12818, this difference was validated by significant differences in TKW. Significant differences in TKW were also detected between various race comparisons for 'ETHBW019', 'CI14798', 'CI15159', 'CI14618', and 'CI14094'. Our data demonstrated that APR in the selected germplasm was largely non-race-specific, but there were exceptions where race-specificity of APR was detected. These results have implications for resistance breeding and monitoring: testing of breeding material against prevalent Pgt races in target environments, not relying only on hotspot screening locations, and careful monitoring of deployed APR varieties are all warranted.

Edae
University of Minnesota
Co-authors: 
Bedada,Girma, Bekele, Hundie, Endale, Hailu, Getaneh, Wonderufael, Bekele, Abeyo, Ayele, Badebo, Pablo, Olivera, Yue, Jin, Gordon, Cisar, Matthew, Rouse, , , , , , , , , ,
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Erena

Identification of resistant sources against rusts of wheat

Evaluation of candidate lines to develop resistant varieties at multiplications in Pakistan is a regular activity which has been successfully done for many years. This approach assists in generation of future resistant cultivars around appropriate genes combinations thereby providing durable resistance outputs for wheat productivity. This year, National Uniform Wheat Yield Trial (NUWYT) comprised of 60 candidate lines. Among these 15 lines were also present in the last years NUWYT. The two years data revealed that there was only one line V-12066 resistant to all three rusts during the two consecutive seasons 2015-16 and 2016-17. Four candidate lines NR-487, V-122557, PR-115 and NRL-1123 were found resistant to yellow and leaf rust during 2015-16 and 2016-17. A candidate line DN-111 was found resistant to leaf and stem rust. There were three lines NW-1-8183-8, NW-5-20-1 and MSH which were found resistant to leaf rust only during two consecutive seasons. Similarly, two candidate lines V-122559 and QS-3 were found resistant to stem rust only, while one line NR-443 was resistant to yellow rust only. The present study provide the screening and evaluation system of Pakistan for promoting and releasing the resistant wheat varieties.

Fayyaz
Crop Diseases Research Institute, National Agricultural Research Center, Park Road Islamabad, Pakistan
Co-authors: 
Anjum Munir, Khalil Ahmed Khanzad, Javed Iqbal Mirza, Shahzad Asad, Atiq ur Rehman Rattu, Muahmmad Imtiaz
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
geographic_area: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Muhammad
Displayed onsite?: 
No

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