All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 81 - 90 of 416 records | 9 of 42 pages

Towards delivery of suitably high yielding, stable, and rust resistant wheat genotypes in the stem rust hotspots of Kenya

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Godwin Macharia Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization
Ruth Wanyera, Bernard Otukho, Bernice Waweru, Hellen Wairimu, Sridhar Bhavani

Emergence of Pgt race Ug99 and rapid proliferation of lineal highly virulent races imminently threaten Kenyan wheat. Devastating epidemics have led to huge losses among smallholder farmers who invariably are unable to spray appropriately and in situations where susceptible varieties are grown. To combat stem rust, the Kenya wheat improvement program seeks to release high yielding stable genotypes with suitable levels of disease resistance. Moreover, detection of genotypes that are adapted to rain-fed environments is an overarching objective. Six hundred and seventeen genotypes from various CIMMYT nurseries (PCBW, EPCBW, PCHPLUS, and 9th SRRSN) were selected based on plant type and reaction to stem rust at Njoro. The reconstituted nursery-KSRON, was sown in the main season of 2016 at Njoro and Timau for further evaluation. Forty red grained lines depicting R-MR infection types, severity of 30% or less, and average Thousand Kernel Weight of >40g were then selected to constitute a yield trial. At each of eight diverse environments, trials also comprising four commercial varieties as checks, were designed in RCBD, three replicates laid out in contiguous array of 8 rows x 10 m plots. Genotype (G), Environment (E) and GE interactions effects were estimated by fitting the AMMI model to yield data, supported by a biplot visualization of the results. Analysis revealed significant (P ?0.01) genotype (G), environment (E), and GE interactions. The first three principal components (PC) explained ~78% of the observed variation. Environment was the predominant source contributing over 85% to total sum of squares. The biplot pointed to at least four environments that were highly correlated. By classifying genotypes based on Shukla's stability variance and Kang's stability rating, six genotypes (R1402, R1411, R1424, R1481, R1484, and R1486) were deemed high yielding and stable, and thus suitable candidates for further testing through the release pipeline.

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Histopathological characterization of R-gene mediated resistance to stripe rust in wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Kamran Saleem Department of Agroecology, Aarhus University, Denmark
Chris Khadgi,S?rensen, Annemarie Fejer, Justesen, Mogens St?vring, Hovm?ller, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat yellow (stripe) rust is a recurrent problem throughout the world, and resistant varieties are an efficient means of managing the disease. Therefore, characterization of diverse sources of resistance is of prime importance for wheat breeding. The objective of the study was to investigate variation in host response in incompatible interactions conferred by different R-genes. Epifluorescence and confocal microscopic methods were utilized for histopathological investigation of six yellow rust R-genes (Yr1, Yr5, Yr6, Yr15, Yr17 and Yr27) in Avocet S background, with Avocet S as the control. Fungal colony size and area of hypersensitive response (HR) were assessed for each interaction at 4, 8 and 16 days post inoculation (dpi). The pattern for Avocet Yr15 was distinct, because HR arrested the pathogen very early and rapidly restricted pathogen growth. Avocet Yr1 and Avocet Yr5 showed a less rapid HR and restriction of pathogen growth, but most colonies were completely surrounded by HR at 8 and 16 dpi. In Avocet Yr6 the size of colonies and the extent of HR were highly variable with continuous change up to 16 dpi. More extensive pathogen growth was observed in Avocet Yr17 and Avocet Yr27, where HR induction was delayed, resulting in large intermingled colonies at 16 dpi. All interactions were clearly different from the susceptible control. Thus each R-gene produced a different temporal and spatial distribution of fungal colonies and HR response. Colony size distributions and HR response patterns are potential parameters for characterization of host resistances with different modes of action in wheat against Pst. The results also expand our comprehension of host resistance in wheat against P. striiformis.

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On-farm seed production through Edget farmers' seed multiplier and marketing cooperative union: Practices and lessons from Basic

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Fikre Handoro Hawassa Agriculture Research Centre
Agdew Bekele, Waga Mazengia, Shimekt Maru

Shortage of seed of rust resistant varieties is a challenge of small holder farmers in wheat production. To successfully address this issue, one of the essential elements in wheat production system is farmer's access to quality seed of improved varieties. This paper presents the experience of on-farm basic and pre-basic seed production of newly released rust resistant wheat varieties. For the first time in the country, On-Farm basic and pre-basic seed production of wheat varieties was carried out in two districts/woredas (Silti and Soddo) of two specific locations (Loke faka and Wacho) where the Edget Farmers' Seed Multiplier and Marketing Union was licensed to produce some crop varieties (cereals and pulse), beginning in the 2011/2012 cropping season. Model farmers from primary cooperatives were selected based on the past experience they had with the union in producing certified seed. Selected farmers and relevant experts were trained on how earh seed of wheat is produced. Accordingly seed multiplication of four wheat varieties was conducted with frequent monitoring and evaluation at the course of multiplication.
As a result sufficient and quality basic seed of newly released wheat varieties was produced on-farm in both Loke and Wacho locations for own utilization and seed market. The result of the experiment revealed that it was possible to multiply quality wheat seed provided that partnership (with GOs and/or NGOs) is well-built and cooperative farmers do farm management practices as per the recommendations. On-farm seed production can be sustainable if the strong partnership exists among stakeholders, and wheat seed growers are given premium prices for their seed which is supported by the legal frame work that encourages the seed production of early generations. More importantly, the result of this experiment has a useful implication on government policies and strategies and government institutions' practice on farm early seed generation production and marketing.

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Genetics of stem rust resistance in South African winter wheat varieties

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Martin Chemonges University of the Free State
Liezel Herselman, Botma Visser, Willem Boshoff, Zacharias Pretorius

Most South African winter wheat varieties display all stage resistance (ASR) to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt). To study inheritance, four resistant varieties were crossed to a susceptible parent (Line 37) and F2 populations were phenotyped at the seedling stage with stem rust race PTKST (Ug99 lineage). Populations derived from varieties Koonap, Komati, Limpopo and SST 387 segregated in a 3:1 ratio, indicating that a single, dominant gene confers resistance in each population. Assessment of F2 seedlings of four intercrosses between these varieties failed to deliver susceptible segregants therefore suggesting that they carry the same resistance gene. Genotyping of F2 plants with microsatellite markers produced consistent linkage of resistance with markers on chromosome 6DS. Experiments are underway to determine the relationship between resistance in the four winter wheat varieties and resistance genes Sr42, SrCad and SrTmp, all located on 6DS. Current evidence shows that ASR in the South African winter wheat varieties Koonap, Komati, Limpopo and SST 387 is based on a single gene and thus vulnerable to pathogenic adaptation in Pgt.

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Innovative manufacturing of a cereal rust inoculation device

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Zak Pretorius University of the Free State
Gerrie Booysen, Willem Boshoff, Jozua Joubert

Urediniospores of rust fungi can be applied to cereal plants in several ways. Depending on the objective and available infrastructure, plants can be inoculated with a suspension of spores in either water, light mineral oil (e.g. Soltrol 130®) or engineered fluid (e.g. Novec 7100®). Alternatively, dry spores can be allowed to settle on plant surfaces by dusting or directly applied with a spatula or small brush. Several rust laboratories employ a system where a spore-oil suspension, contained in a gelatin capsule, is sprayed onto seedling leaves by means of a dedicated atomizer connected to an air pressure source. Although this approach is easy to use and highly efficient, the devices are not commercially available in South Africa. Locally, these inoculation appliances need to be manufactured by a conventional milling process that requires a specialized workshop and skilled personnel. This subtractive process is labour intensive and greatly prohibitive in terms of costs. Using a process called Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as "3D printing", the body of an inoculator was digitally designed and then laser sintered in nylon. Loose powder was removed from flow channels by compressed air. A copper tube fitted afterwards connected the nylon body with the spore suspension in the capsule. Replicated inoculation tests of wheat seedlings with urediniospore bulks or single pustule collections of Puccinia triticina and P. graminis f. sp. tritici resulted in consistent levels of rust severity and infection frequency. Cleaning of inoculators in acetone for 1 min followed by a 1 h heat treatment at 60°C produced no contaminant infection in follow-up tests. The design has been registered in South Africa, the USA and Europe.

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Improvement of drought and salt tolerance of wheat genotypes under field conditions by high throughput precision phenotyping

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Magdi Abdelhamid National Research Centre
Ibrahim El-Metwally

Food crisis is a major concern in Egypt, where drought and saline soils are ubiquitous. Wheat is a staple food in Egypt, which is only moderately tolerant to drought and salinity. Due to its rapidly increasing demand, there is an urgent need in Egypt to enhance wheat yields under drought and salinity conditions. Improving salinity or/and drought tolerance of genotypes is inhibited by a lack of efficient evaluation methods. High throughput precision phenotyping provides an innovative technology to screen for enhanced salt or drought tolerance from a large of number of genotypes under field conditions and can have immediate value to plant breeding. Therefore, we have tested several wheat phenotyping techniques i.e., canopy temperature (CT), spectral reflectance (SR), chlorophyll content (SPAD value), crop ground cover, relative water content (RWC), Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC), leaf area index (LAI), crop morphological traits, and grain wheat yield and yield components. We documented strong correlation/linear regression/polynomial regression between the wheat phenotyping techniques and in-season biomass/grain yield. It could be concluded that the documented results confirmed that several landraces were selected as drought/salinity tolerant out of 762 wheat landraces wheat were screened. Using high throughput precision phenotyping could provide an innovative technology and can have immediate value to plant breeding.

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Genes Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 interact to confer enhanced adult plant resistance to the three rust diseases of common wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mandeep Singh Randhawa International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico D.F., Mexico
Ravi P. Singh, Caixia Lan, Bhoja R. Basnet, Sridhar Bhavani, Julio Huerta-Espino, Kerrie L. Forrest, Matthew J. Hayden

Common wheat Arula displays an acceptable level of adult plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust (YR), leaf rust (LR) and stem rust (SR) in Mexico, and to SR (Ug99 races) in Kenya. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population developed from the cross of Arula with susceptible parent Apav was phenotyped under artificially created epidemics of the three rusts in 2014, 2015 and 2016 in Mexico and for SR during the off and main seasons of 2015 in Kenya. The RIL population and parents were genotyped using an iSelect 90K SNP array and 3 gene-linked markers (Sr2/Yr30-gwm533; Lr34/Yr18/Sr57-csLV34; Lr68-csGS), and a genetic map of 2,634 markers was constructed to locate the resistance loci. Two consistent QTL contributed by Arula were detected on chromosomes 3BS and 7DS, which corresponded to the previously known APR genes Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, respectively. Sr2/Yr30 explained 1.1-14.7% and 41.0-61.5% of the phenotypic variation for YR and SR, respectively; whereas Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 accounted for 22.5-78.0%, 40.0-84.3% and 13.8-24.8% of the phenotypic variation for YR, LR and SR, respectively. Arula was also found to carry the positive allele for marker csGS closely linked to gene Lr68 on chromosome 7BL, although this gene was not detected using composite interval mapping. Our results show that RILs possessing both Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 had significantly enhanced APR to all three rusts in field trials conducted in Mexico and Kenya. Strategic utilization of these two pleiotropic, multi-pathogen resistance genes with other minor genes is recommended to develop durable rust resistant wheat cultivars.

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Study of the effect of planting date on the severity of yellow rust disease on bread wheat in northeastern Syria

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Omran Youssef University of Hohenheim, Germany
Afrem,Issa, Helim, Youssef, Nawzad, Suleiman, Abdul Rahman, Issa, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat is grown in Syria during the November-December. Wheat is exposed to many strains that negatively affect its productivity especially rust diseases, which was reported on wheat in Syria for many years and the most severe in 2010, Therefore, we studied the effect of planting dates on the severity and development of yellow rust disease. Where the field trials of the 2010-2011 season were carried out at the two locations in northeastern of Syria: Al-Qamishli Research Center and Yanbouh Research Station in Al-Malekia. By cultivating the susceptible bread wheat Cham 8, where six dates were planted starting from 02.10. 2010, a difference of 15 days. The results showed there was a difference in the severity of the yellow rust disease according to the dates of cultivation and thus the stages of growth in the plant and this was evident in the Yanbouh location where the onset of the onset of injury on 08.04.2011 in the all dates and developed the infection to 40S degrees and 30%. Also, on the 24. 04. 2011, the infection was recorded at the Qamishli location only on the third and fourth dates. The disease did not develop more than 10S and 10% due to climatic conditions due to rain and high temperature during the season. The results showed a positive correlation between the evolution of the disease and vegetative growth of plants, where the growth of plants was more active at the site of Yanbouh, especially in the second, third and fourth dates in the development of infection on plants in the rest of the dates because of weak and slow growth of plants.

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SAARC Tool Box: an approach to manage wheat rusts disease in Nepal

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Baidya Nath Mahto Nepal Agricultural Research Council (NARC)
Suraj Baidya, Dhruba Bahadur Thapa, Roshan Basnet, Sunita Adhikari, Prem Bahadur Magar, Ajaya Karkee, Nabin Dangal, Basistha Acharya, Ram Bahadur Khadka, Junga Bahadur Prasad, Purusottam Jha, Laxman Aryal, Prakash Pantha

Rusts are one of major threats to reduce wheat production and productivity in Nepal. Rust fungi are obligate parasite survival during off-season either on voluntary wheat plants or other grass or timber plant species is not yet confirmed in Nepal. High-inputs, suitable hosts and existence of warm humid and cool high lands in different parts of country promote carryover of inoculums of rust fungi. Nepal could be potential sources of yellow rust and leaf rust epidemic for itself and for Indian sub-continent. Surveillance is one of important steps to know status of wheat diseases especially rusts occurrence in country. The SAARC rust tool box is systematic and regular monitoring activity of wheat and barley diseases conducted at various locations in Nepal. Altogether, 183 and 180 locations were surveyed in different parts of Nepal were put in global rust tool box server and validated in fiscal years 2014/15 and 2015/16. Wheat rusts disease scenario has been observed differently, it could be due to climate change and different virulent spectrum of races/pathotypes of rusts fungi and deployment of different wheat varieties. Yellow rust was widely occurred throughout mid hills in Nepal. Higher severity of yellow rust was observed in Kathmandu valley (80S -100S). Leaf rust was moderate to high (10MS-100S) in plain and hills. There was higher score of leaf rust observed in plain as well as in mid hills on susceptible wheat cultivar. Regular monitoring and surveillance at different locations in Nepal has been found helpful in digging out actual problems of wheat crop. Monitoring races of all three rusts occurring in Nepal is necessary for successful planning to manage rusts by deploying effective genes. Rust tool box is important to keep vigilance of new emerging rust races in country. This in turn could increase production and productivity of wheat in Nepal.

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Genomic scan in durum wheat reveals regions controlling adaptation to the heat-prone conditions of the Senegal River

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Amadou Tidiane Sall ICARDA
Filippo,Bassi, Rodomiro, Ortiz, Ibrahima, Ndoye, AbdelKarim, Filali-Maltouf, Bouchra, Belkadi, Miloudi, Nachit, Michel, Baum, Hafssa, Kabbaj, Habibou, Gueye, Madiama, Cisse, , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat is a major food crop in West Africa, but its production is significantly affected by severe heat. Unfortunately, these types of high temperatures are also becoming frequent in other regions where wheat is commonly grown. In an attempt to improve durum wheat tolerance to heat, a collection of 287 elite breeding lines, including several from both ICARDA and CIMMYT, was assessed for response to heat stress in two irrigated sites along the Senegal River: Fanaye, Senegal and Kaedi, Mauritania during 2014-2015, and 2015-2016 winter seasons. The maximum recorded grain yield was 5t ha-1, which was achieved after just 90 days from sowing to harvesting. Phenological traits (heading, maturity and grain filling period) and yield components (1000-kernel weight, spike density and biomass) had also large phenotypic variation and a significant effect on grain yield performance. This panel was genotyped by 35K Axiom to generate 8,173 polymorphic SNPs. Genomic scans identified a total of 34 significant association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and traits across the four environments, including 15 related to phenological adaptation, 12 controlling grain yield components, and seven linked to grain yield per se. The identification of these genomic regions can now be used to design targeted crosses to pyramid heat tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTL), while the SNPs underlying these QTL can be deployed to accelerate selection process facilitated by DNA-aided breeding.

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