All BGRI Abstracts

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GWAS of field and seedling response to individual Pgt races reveals combinations of race-specific genes in spring wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Erena Edae University of Minnesota
Michael Pumphrey, Matthew Rouse

Stem rust of wheat caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici historically caused major yield losses of wheat worldwide. To understand the genetic basis of stem rust resistance in contemporary North American spring wheat, genome-wide association analysis was conducted on 250 elite lines. The lines were evaluated in separate nurseries each inoculated with a different P. graminis f. sp. tritici race for three years (2013, 2015 and 2016) at Rosemount, Minnesota. The lines were also challenged with the same four races at the seedling stage in a greenhouse facility at the USDA-ARS Cereal Disease Laboratory. A total of 22,310 high-quality SNPs obtained from the Infinium 90,000 SNPs chip were used to perform association analysis. Markers strongly associated with resistance to the four races at seedling and field environments were identified. At the seedling stage, the most significant marker-trait associations were detected in the regions of known major genes (Sr6, Sr7a and Sr9b) except for race QFCSC where a strong association was detected on chromosome arm 1AL. Markers presumably linked to Sr6 and Sr7a were associated with both seedling and field resistance to specific races. A field resistance QTL on chromosome arm 2DS was detected for response to races RCRSC and TPMKC. A QTL specific to field resistance was detected for QFCSC and TPMKC on 2BL. The markers that showed strong association signals may be useful to pyramid and track race-specific stem rust resistance genes in wheat breeding programs. We postulated the presence of Sr2, Sr6, Sr7a, Sr8a, Sr9b, Sr11, Sr12, Sr24, Sr25, Sr31, and Sr57 (Lr34) in this germplasm based on phenotypic and marker data. We found that combinations of genes conferring resistance to specific P. graminis f. sp. tritici races accounts for the prevalent stem rust resistance in North American spring wheat.

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Building upon past successes for a continued impact on production and food security through breeding high yielding climate change resilient durum wheat varieties

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mohamed Salah Gharbi National Institute of Agriculture Research, Tunisia

Meeting food security challenges is a high priority in many developing countries. North African countries are among those with the highest per capita wheat consumption in the world and chronic grain deficits. Climate change scenarios predict decrease of rainfall and increase of temperature with negative impact on crop production and hence food security. Along with adoption of modern technologies, breeding higher yielding and more climate change resilient wheat varieties is widely seen as a tool that can sustain past yield gains and food production increases. Durum wheat production in Tunisia greatly benefited from the green revolution ingredients. Continued breeding lead to replacement of the early semi dwarf varieties with higher yielding, better disease resistant and more drought tolerant ones that have positively impacted yield at farmer and national level. Monitoring gains from increased yield potential and resistance to the most damaging foliar diseases, mainly septoria leaf blotch, leaf rust and stripe rust, showed that grain yield of recently released varieties is up to four times that of the tall late maturing landraces grown before the 1970's and up to 2.5 times that of varieties of the early years of the green revolution. Chlorophyll content, green leaf duration, deeper root development from diverse donors including wild wheat relatives and grain yield are being integrated in the breeding program for the selection of more drought and heat stress tolerant durum cultivars

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Wheat rusts status and population structure across Pakistan during wheat growing seasons 2015-16 and 2016-17

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sajid Ali The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan
Muhammad,Khan, Safi, Kathi, Zahoor, Swati, Manzoor, Hussain, Annemarie, Justesen, Muhamamd, Imtiaz, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Considering the importance of wheat rust diseases in Pakistan and the recent identification of yellow rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) centre of diversity in Pakistan, the present study was designed to assess the status of three wheat rusts across the country during 2015-16 and 2016-17 and analyze the population structure of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici . A total of 451 fields (from 68 districts) were surveyed during 2016 and 480 fields (from 69 districts) during 2017. A high yellow rust pressure was present during 2016 throughout Pakistan, while it was predominant only in the Northern half during 2017. Leaf rust was present in the central part of the country, while stem rust was only found in the south. In Sindh province (located in the south), yellow rust was reported unexpectedly with high severity (>60%) on varieties like Kiran and Galaxy during both the years. A set of 513 samples of P. striiformis were genotyped with microsatellite markers to assess the population diversity and spatial structure. and infer on the cause of epidemics in the Sindh province. Population genetics analyses confirmed a recombinant population structure across all locations except the Sindh province, where relatively lower diversity and lack of recombination signature was revealed. At least five genetic groups were identified in the overall population, which were found across all locations, except Sindh province where one of the genetic groups was predominant. The P. striiformis population from Sindh province with low diversity that caused unexpected epidemics in a relatively warmer region needs to be further investigated for specific adaptation traits. Our results confirmed the high diversity across Pakistan, which lies in the Himalayan centre of diversity of the pathogen. This high diversity was present in locations without the presence of alternate host (Berberis spp.) and could potentially be associated with regular migrants from the Berberis zone into the whole country.

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Epidemics of stripe (yellow) rust on wheat and triticale fields of Algeria in 2016.

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Nora DERBAL Laboratoire de Biologie, Eau et Environnement, département d'écologie,university of 8 mai1945 Guelma, Algeria
Abdelkader Benbelkacem

Epidemics of stripe (yellow) rust on wheat and triticale fields of Algeria in 2016. Wheat and triticale fields in 69 localities from the eastern regions of Algeria were assessed for epidemics, which started in early march to late may corresponding to booting stage up to early dough stage of the alternative type crop. The infection had incidences ranging from 30 to 100% and severities of 30 to 70%. The newly released cultivar Ksar sbahi was infected up to 10%. The old improved durum cultivars HAR3116 (SHA7/KAUZ) and HAR1407 (COOK/VEES//DOVES) were rust-free at a number of locations. In the Amhara region, the wheat cultivars were at stem elongation to flowering with disease incidences of 50-100% and severities of 30-90%. The oldest cultivar ET 13 A2 was severely infected in the north Shewa zone of Amhara region. Triticale cultivar Logaw Shibo was susceptible at elevations above 2700 m and showed trace reactions at elevations below 2500 m. The local bread wheat cultivar grown in all wheat growing areas was only slightly affected by the disease. Yellow rust was rarely recorded in the Tigray region. Severe epidemics were recorded in the highlands and even at lower elevations where it is not commonly found on wheat.

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Genetic variability of drought sdaptive traits in nepalese wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germplasm

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Dipendra Pokharel Department of Agriculture, Sunsari, Nepal

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the major cereal crops vital for global food supply. Most of the wheat crop in developing world including that of Nepal is either grown with limited irrigation or under rainfed conditions and thus face moisture stress at one or more growth stages limiting grain yield. An experiment was carried out at the Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science, Rampur to evaluate the genetic variability of selected drought adaptive traits in Nepalese wheat germplasm. The wheat genotypes evaluated comprised of Nepalese landraces and commercial cultivars, CIMMYT (International Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement) derived advanced introduction lines and three checks with differential drought adaptability. The wheat genotypes were grown in pots (single plant) arranged in a replicated split plot design in greenhouse under two contrasting moisture regimes, optimum and moisture stressed. The genotypes were evaluated for water use, water use efficiency, relative leaf water content and biomass production. The ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) revealed significant variation between environments and among the wheat genotypes for most of the traits studied. A wide range of variability was observed for water use, water use efficiency, biomass yield and relative leaf water content in moisture stressed and non-stressed environments. Nepalese cultivar Gautam showed a number of favorable drought adaptive traits, whereas, Bhrikuti was average in this respect. Based on the scores of drought adaptive traits recently released Cultivar (cv). Vijay was characterized as drought sensitive. A number of landraces and advanced breeding lines showed high level of water use efficiency and other positive traits for drought adaptation.

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Varietal performance of wheat varieties against rusts and its adoption in Nepal

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Dhruba Bahadur Thapa Agriculture Botany Division, Nepal Agricultural Research Council
Baidya Nath,Mahto, Sarala, Sharma, Madan Raj, Bhatta, Mahesh, Subedi, Deepak, Pandey, Nutan Raj, Gautam, Suraj, Baidya, Roshan, Basnet, Rudra, Bhattarai, Ajaya, Karkee, Suk Bahadur, Gurung, Prem Bahadur, Magar, Sunita, Adhikari, Bhagarathi, Shahi, Basistha, Acharya

A total of 41 bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties have been released so far in Nepal since 1960. Farmers have been gradually adopting newly released varieties due to disease and lodging resistance, better yield performance and good taste. In Nepal, wheat area coverage, production and productivity have been increased by almost seven, sixteen and two folds, respectively in the last 56 years. Performance of varieties varies from one region to another. Yellow rust is the major problems in hills while leaf rust is the primary issue on the plains. Stem rust is sporadic in localized areas of Nepal. Wheat research program in Nepal has released 9 wheat varieties resistant to Ug99 namely Vijaya, Tilottama, Banganga, Gaura, Dhaulagiri, Danphe, Sworgadwari, Munal and Chyakhura. Vijay, Tilottama and Banganga are also resistant to leaf rust while, Dhaulagiri, Danphe, Sworgadwari, Munal and Chyakhura are resistant to yellow rust. Since the release of Vijay, the first Ug99 resistant variety in Nepal during 2010, source seed production of rust resistant varieties has been increasing significantly each year with present coverage under these varieties being around 40%. WK 1204 has been occupied 35% area in hills of Nepal. Seed production and distribution of such high yielding disease resistant varieties through public-private partnership is leading to quality seed supply for varietal diversity and better food security in the country.

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New QTL for leaf rust and stripe rust resistance in four bread wheat and two durum wheat mapping populations

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Caixia Lan CIMMYT
Ravi,Singh, Julio, Huerta-Espino, Mandeep, Randhawa, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat leaf rust (LR) and stripe rust (YR), caused by the air-borne fungi Puccinia triticina (Pt) and Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), respectively, are considered the primary biotic threats to bread wheat and durum wheat production globally. Growing resistant wheat varieties is a key method of minimizing the extent of yield losses caused by these diseases. Bread wheat lines Francolin #1, Kenya Kongoni, Kundan and Sujata, and CIMMYT-derived durum wheat lines Bairds and Dunkler display an adequate level of adult plant resistance (APR) to both leaf rust and stripe rust in Mexican field environments. Six recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations developed from crosses Avocet/Francolin #1, Avocet/Kenya Kongoni, Avocet/Kundan, Avocet/Sujata, Atred#1/Bairds and Atred#1/Dunkler were phenotyped for leaf rust response at Ciudad Obregon, Mexico, and the bread wheat populations for stripe rust response at Toluca for under artificial inoculations for multiple seasons. The RIL populations and their parents were genotyped with the 50 K diversity arrays technology (DArT) sequence system and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Known pleotropic APR genes Lr46/Yr29 mapped in all of six populations, and explained 7.4-65.1% and 7.7-66.1% severity variations for LR and YR across different bread wheat populations and accounted for 12.4-60.8% of LR severity variations over two durum wheat populations. In addition, several new APR loci identified on chromosomes 1AS, 1DS, 2BS, 2BL, 3D and 7BL in bread wheat and QTL on chromosome 6BL in durum wheat. Among these loci, QTL on chromosomes 1AS, 3D and 7BL might be represent new co-located/pleotropic loci conferring APR to LR and YR. RILs combining these APR loci can be used as sources of complex APR in both bread wheat and durum wheat breeding. In addition, the closely linked single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have been converted into breeder-friendly kompetitive allele specific PCR (KASP) markers and their diagnostic verified.

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Detection of race-specificity of adult plant resistance to wheat stem rust

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Erena Edae University of Minnesota
Bedada,Girma, Bekele, Hundie, Endale, Hailu, Getaneh, Wonderufael, Bekele, Abeyo, Ayele, Badebo, Pablo, Olivera, Yue, Jin, Gordon, Cisar, Matthew, Rouse, , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a significant disease limiting wheat yield in Ethiopia. Wheat varieties such as 'Digalu' with single major-effect stem rust resistance genes have not exhibited durable resistance in Ethiopia. Identifying wheat lines with adult plant resistance (APR) has been proposed as a strategy to select for durable resistance. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that APR to stem rust is non-race-specific. We selected 31 wheat lines (including 10 durum and 21 bread wheat lines) that were susceptible as seedlings to Pgt races TTKSK, TKTTF, and TRTTF. These 31 wheat lines and Digalu were evaluated in 2014 and 2015 at the Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia. The lines were planted in 1 m rows and replicated twice in separate single-race-inoculated nurseries. The three single-race nurseries inoculated with Pgt races TTKSK, TKTTF, and TRTTF were separated by at least 100 m and included selective spreaders. Plot yield, thousand kernel weight (TKW), and visual disease responses were measured for each plot. We used a least-squared means test to detect differences in coefficient of infection and TKW of each line across paired race comparisons. Lines 'Park', 'CI11469', and 'CI12818' displayed significantly different coefficient of infections between races TTKSK and TRTTF. For CI11469 and CI12818, this difference was validated by significant differences in TKW. Significant differences in TKW were also detected between various race comparisons for 'ETHBW019', 'CI14798', 'CI15159', 'CI14618', and 'CI14094'. Our data demonstrated that APR in the selected germplasm was largely non-race-specific, but there were exceptions where race-specificity of APR was detected. These results have implications for resistance breeding and monitoring: testing of breeding material against prevalent Pgt races in target environments, not relying only on hotspot screening locations, and careful monitoring of deployed APR varieties are all warranted.

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Accelerated Cloning and Characterization of Adult Plant Resistance Genes in Wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sreya Ghosh John Innes Centre
Burkhard,Steuernagel, Caixia, Lan, Miroslava, Karafi?tov?, Ksenia, Krasileva, Jaroslav, Dole?el, Evans, Lagudah, Ravi, Singh, Brande, Wulff, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Adult Plant Resistance (APR) genes are broad-spectrum, partial-resistance genes that have the potential to contribute to sustainable control of wheat rust diseases. However, their isolation and characterization are complicated by the lack of precise molecular markers required for their identification, and therefore their use in plant breeding programs has been limited. Recent developments including the falling cost of sequencing and the increasing use of sequence capture methods to reduce genome complexity have enabled previously intractable methods such as mutational genomics to clone genes in wheat. Despite their increasing ease of use, many of these approaches require prior knowledge of the gene space and, in some cases, the gene family of the target gene to be cloned. As the APRs cloned so far do not belong to any common gene family, it is not possible to use general features of these identified APRs to conduct biased searches for novel APRs. This project aims to use an unbiased gene isolation technique called MutChromSeq, which combines chromosome flow-sorting and mutational genomics, and is independent of fine mapping, to rapidly clone the recently discovered APR gene Lr68 (Leaf Rust 68). Cloning APRs allows breeders to trace genes cheaply and quickly using gene-specific markers, enabling them to build effective and durable resistance gene pyramids. It also allows us to elucidate any common mechanism of action they have, helping researchers and breeders understand better the basis of their durable resistance. At the same time, the generation time of wheat has become one of the major limiting factors for the response time of breeders to rust epidemics. Thus, this project also aims to combine marker-assisted selection with accelerated generation advancement ('speed breeding') for rapid germplasm structuring and field performance evaluation.

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Rust resistance and inheritance pattern to stripe and leaf rust in elite wheat germplasm from North Hills of India

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Shubhanshu Anubhav CSK Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, India
Aashima Bhateja, Ravi Sharma, Vijay Rana, Hanif Khan

Wheat crop is attacked by three rust diseases of which stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina, are the most common causing greater yield losses. Thirty genotypes were studied for (APR) adult plant resistance and were evaluated in field conditions and controlled conditions. HPW 373, VW 20145, VL 3002, RKVY 231, VL 907, PBW 698 and HS 507 were found to be highly resistant to yellow rust at both seedling and adult plant stages. While, genotypes HS 490, HPW 314, HPW 360, RKVY 133, Raj 4362, DBW 113 and HPW 403 showing very low AUDPC values were found to be moderately resistant under field conditions. These lines are suggested for use in breeding program and some are in network trials for their direct release. Inheritance studies were carried out to decipher the genetics of seedling rust resistance in elite germplasm line HPW 373. The F2s were evaluated for seedling resistance against yellow rust (46S119, 78S84) and leaf rust (77-5-North American equivalent THTTM) races. Resistance in HPW 373 is controlled by single dominant gene against leaf rust (77-5) and stripe rust (78S84). Against stripe rust (46S119), resistance of HPW 373 is controlled by recessive gene. The findings are expected to contribute towards enriching diversity for leaf and stripe rust resistance in bread wheat improvement programmes.

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