All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 81 - 90 of 415 records | 9 of 42 pages

Durable and High Level Stripe Rust Resistance in Wheat Cultivar Madsen Conferred by Five QTL for All-stage or HTAP Resistance

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Xianming Chen USDA-ARS, Pullman, WA, USA
Lu Liu, Meinan Wang, Junyan Feng, Deven See, Shiaoman Chao

Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is the most destructive disease of wheat in the US Pacific Northwest. Durable high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust has been emphasized for breeding wheat cultivars and the resistance level has been gradually increased since the early 1960s. Wheat cultivar Madsen has been widely grown, intensively used in breeding programs, and has exhibited durable and high level resistance to stripe rust since its release in 1988. To map its resistance genes and determine the genetic basis of durable and high-level of resistance, Madsen was crossed with susceptible cultivar Avocet S, and 156 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were developed. The RILs and parents were tested with races PSTv-37 and PSTv-40 in seedling stage at low temperatures in the greenhouse and in adult-plant stage in the fields of Pullman and Mount Vernon, WA in 2015 and 2016 under natural infection of the pathogen. The RILs were genotyped with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers derived from genotyping by sequencing and the 90K Illumina iSelect wheat SNP chip. A linkage map was constructed with 1,348 SNP loci. QTL analysis identified three genes for all-stage resistance on chromosomes 1AS (QYrMad.wgp-1AS), 1BS (QYrMad.wgp-1BS), and 2AS (QYrMad.wgp-2AS); and two QTL for HTAP resistance on 3B (QYrMad.wgp-3B) and 6B (QYrMad.wgp-6B). QYrMad.wgp-2AS was the most significant QTL, explaining 16.03-71.23% phenotypic variation depending upon the race or environment, followed by QYrMad.wgp-6B that was consistently detected in all field experiments and explained 6.7-35.9% of the phenotypic variations. Based on the chromosomal locations and the results from other studies, QYrMad.wgp-2AS contains Yr17 and a HTAP resistance QTL, and QYrMad.wgp-1AS is a new QTL. The interactions among these QTL were mostly additive. The combination of the five QTL for different types of resistance provides the durable and high level resistance to stripe rust.

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Resistance to tan spot in Tunisian wheat landraces

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mejda Cherif National Agronomic Institute of Tunisia
Sana Kamel, Elhem, Elfahem, Wissal Feriani, Hanen Sbei

In order to identify sources of resistance to tan spot caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, 359 local wheat accessions were evaluated for reaction to the Oued-Mliz isolate in controlled conditions and in the field. Two and three assessments were carried out at the seedling and adult stages, respectively. There was a highly significant accession effect and 4.2% of accessions were highly resistant in both controlled conditions and the field. Assessments at the seedling stage were positively correlated with each other, and assessments in the adult stage were also positively correlated. However, assessments at the seedling stage were negatively correlated with those at the adult stage. One hundred and fifty five accessions with known origins (from 15 localities belonging to four districts) were projected on a graph defined by the two axes: reactions at the seedling stage and reactions at the adult stage. After placing the average reactions at the seedling and adult stages on the graph, four groups of accessions were obtained: accessions that were resistant to both stages, accessions that were resistant at the adult stage only, accessions that were resistant at the seedling stage only, and accessions that were susceptible at both stages. All four groups were found in each district. However, considering localities, reactions of accessions were highly variable. For example, accessions originating from Menzel Hbib were genetically variable and were represented in each of the four groups, whereas accessions from Sidi El Hani were all resistant at both stages. Further work is needed to study the genetic variability within and between localities and to better understand the resistant accessions.

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A new warrior race of Puccinia striiformis f.sp tritici in Syria

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mohammad Kassem Aleppo University, Aleppo , Syria
Bassam,Souliman, Naem, Al-Housien, Mohammad Shafick, Hakiem, Miloudi.M, Nachit, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat yellow rust, caused by Puccinia triticina f. sp. tritici, is the major problem in wheat production in most parts of West Asia. Monitoring of the pathogen virulence factors and their changes provides basic information for the development of an early warning system. Wheat yellow rust has become increasingly important in the Syrian central and coastal areas during the last three years, The objective of this study was to identify races of the pathogen. Yellow rust samples collected at sites in the central and the coastal plains, were analyzed on differential host genotypes with known seedling resistance genes. According to the results of race determination, races 230E150, 166E150, 230E142 and 462E128 were identified. The race 462E128 designated the Warrior race, was identified at several sites across the Syrian central plains at the end of the 2017 growing season (early and Mid-May) when yellow rust exploded suddenly on a number of varieties, despite their previous high resistance ratings. The infections rapidly reached significant levels, in spite of the high temperature (up to 33?C) and the absence of rainfall or irrigation. This new virulent race (462E128) has been able to attack wheat lines with several major resistance gene(s) including: Spaldings Prolific (SP), Yr 3+4, Triticum spelta (Yr5), which remained effective until 2016 in Syria, Virulence to lthe resistance genes Yr1, Yr2, Yr2+, Yr3V, Yr3ND, Yr4+, Yr6, Yr6+, Yr7, Yr7+, Yr9, Yr9+, Yr11, Yr12, Yr18, Yr24, Yr26 Spaldings Prolific (YrSP), Anza (YrA+) Spaldings Prolific (SP), Yr 3+4, Triticum spelta (Yr5) and Selkirk (YrSK) was also found. Virulence to Carstens V (CV), Yr 15/6* Avocet S and Yr 5/6* Avocet S; was not found. According to our findings, the Warrior race has increased in frequency within the mix of yellow rust races in these areas in Syria . It is expected that the Warrior yellow rust race will cause damage on resistant wheat cultivars in 2018.

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The need for seed: Support for formal and informal suppliers of certified wheat seed in Ethiopia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Bekele Abeyo CIMMYT
Ayele Badebo, Abebe Atilaw, Habtemariam Zegeye, Zerihun Tadesse, Wasihun Legesse, Terefe Fitta, Dawit Asnake

In Ethiopia, quality seed of improved varieties is the least expensive and most critical input for the sustainable production of wheat, a strategic food security crop grown by some 4.7 million households on 1.7 million hectares. Because wheat is self-pollinated, farmers can save and replant seed from their harvests for several years, without the variety losing its genetic identity. At the same time, recommended seed rates for wheat (150 to 200 kilograms per hectare) are significantly higher than those for tef (15 kg/ha) or maize (25 kg/ha), so some 255,000 tons of seed is required to sow Ethiopia's entire wheat area each year. Most of this still comes from informal seed systems; only four seed enterprises (ESE, ASE, OSE and SNNPSE) currently produce certified seed of various crops and they lack the capacity to supply enough high quality seed for the nation's approximately 20 million households. In collaboration with the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) and through the USAID-funded project "Seed multiplication and delivery of high-yielding rust resistant bread and durum wheat varieties to Ethiopian farmers," the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) is working to increase wheat farmers access to affordable, certified seed of improved varieties that are high-yielding and also feature durable resistance to the rust diseases. Approaches pursued include the fast-track evaluation and release of improved varieties, the pre-release or accelerated seed multiplication of released wheat varieties through formal and informal seed systems, and demonstrations and scaling up of improved wheat varieties. This paper describes best practices to address seed shortages faced by wheat farmers in 53 woredas.

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Yellow rust disease status and pathogen population structure in Northwestern region of Pakistan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Zia Rehman The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan
Muhammad Khan, Muhammad Imtiaz, Zahoor Swati, Annemarie Justesen, Sajid Ali

Yellow rust caused by Puccinia striiformis is an important disease in Pakistan. The population structure of P. striiformis in the North Eastern Himalayan region of Pakistan have been shown to be genotypically diverse with potential role of sexual recombination (Ali et al., 2014b), while lesser diversity in the Southern districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP)(Khan et al., 2015). This study was designed for the first time to assess disease status and analyze population structure of P. striiformis across three distant parts of Northwestern Pakistan i.e., Bajaur in North Western Agency and Swat and Buner in Malakand Agency, and was compared with other Pakistani populations. Depending on the intensity of infections caused by the pathogen in the tested varieties and breeding lines, the severity of the disease ranged from 5% to 100% during 2015. Yellow rust severity was the maximum on Morocco (100%), Gomal (100%) and KPWYT-18 (80%) and moderate on Ghanimat-e-IBGE (10%) and PS-2008, PS-2013, Tatara and Millat with 20% severity. A total of 81 single lesion samples collected on infected varieties were genotyped with 18 microsatellite markers. From these, 63 distinct multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were detected; 15 single lesion samples collected from Buner produced 15 distinct MLGs signifying very high diversity. A high genotypic diversity with clear signature of recombination was detected across all the three locations. Buner (100%) had the maximum diversity followed by Swat (97%) and Bajaur (91%). The observed diversity was almost equal to other Northeastern Himalayan populations of Pakistan, while it was high when compared to some southern populations of KP (genotypic diversity of 0.895) and other worldwide clonal populations (Ali et al., 2014a). The high diversity and recombinant population structure suggested potential role of sexual reproduction in these areas, which needs to be further explored to establish the origin of diverse virulence pattern in Pakistan.

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Virulence evolution of Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici on wheat in Kenya between 1970 to 1992 and 2009 to 2014

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mercy Wamalwa Egerton University Njoro, Kenya
Ruth Wanyera, James Owuoche, Julian Rodriguez, Annemarie Justesen, Lesley Lesley, Sridhar Bhavani, Cristobal Uauy, Mogens Hovmøller

Emergence of new virulent races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) to stripe (yellow) rust resistance genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has historically resulted in severe yield losses worldwide. We conducted a study to characterize the virulence profiles of Pst races prevalent in Kenya from historic (1970-1992) and recent collections (2009-2014). Pst isolates collected during surveys in Kenya were characterized at the Global Rust Research Centre (GRRC), Denmark. Yellow rust differential sets (wheat lines with known Yr resistance genes), and strain-specific sequence-characterized-amplified-region (SCAR) markers were used to group the Pst isolates as Pst1 or Pst2. Virulence to Yr1, Yr2, Yr3,Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr17, Yr25, Yr27, and the seedling resistance in AvocetS were detected. A total of 12 virulence profiles /races were detected in isolates obtained during 1970 to 1992, while six races were detected from samples collected between 2009 to 2014. In both periods, races with virulence profiles Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr25, Yr27, Avs and Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr17, Yr25, AvS were common. The SCAR results revealed that both Pst1 and Pst2 strains were present in the Pst isolates tested, Pst1 even in isolates from the 1970s. Additional isolates were also identified with neither Pst1 nor Pst2 profiles. From our findings, race analysis is key to understand the race diversity and pre-breeding efforts for effective resistance gene deployment.

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Virulence of Puccinia triticina races collected on durum wheat in Spain during 2009-2015

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Fernando Martinez-Moreno University of Seville
Solis,Ignacio, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leaf rust is an important worldwide disease on wheat caused by the fungus Puccinia triticina. Great infections on durum wheat occurred in Southern Spain in the 2000s but diminished in recent years due to deployment of resistant varieties and application of fungicides by farmers. A leaf rust survey was carried out from the 2009-15 period to monitor the virulence spectrum of the prevailing pathotypes. A total of 84 leaf rust isolates were collected on durum wheat fields. From those, single culture were obtained and used to inoculate a set of 27 differential isolines of the susceptible variety Thatcher. In addition 8 durum varieties with known Lr genes were also included.
The main highlight is that the resistance conferred by the popular Lr14a gene was broke up in 2013, but since then virulence to this gene is not widespread. In total, 23% of the isolates were virulent to the lines containing Lr14a. Lr1, Lr3, Lr3bg, Lr16, Lr24, Lr26, and Lr28 are very effective. Lines carrying Lr2c, Lr10, Lr14b, Lr20, Lr23, and LrB displayed susceptibility to most isolates. The durum varieties Jupare (Lr27+Lr31), Guayacan (Lr61), Storlom (Lr3+) and Camayo (LrCam) are also resistant against all isolates tested. Diversification of Lr genes is needed in the coming varieties to delay the appearance of new virulent races.

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Characterisation of putative pleiotropic wheat leaf rust resistance gene Lr13

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Timothy Hewitt CSIRO
Jianping Zhang, Peng Zhang, Robert Park, Narayana Upadhyaya, Robert McIntosh, Sambasivam Periyannan, Brande Wulff, Burkhard Steuernagel, Evans Lagudah

Evolution of rust pathogens continues to pose challenges to global wheat production. Major resistance (R) genes, which encode proteins of the NBS-LRR (Nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat) family, have been a valuable resource for breeders to minimise yield losses from infection. Many wheat varieties harbor numerous R genes that could be identified and cloned in order to engineer more sustainable disease control. The advent of targeted gene enrichment and next-generation sequencing (NGS) has allowed rapid cloning of specific R genes, thus enhancing efforts to pyramid these genes and investigate their underlying resistance mechanisms. Several R genes present different phenotypes in certain genetic backgrounds, and cloning them would be an important step towards uncovering their interactions. Hybrid necrosis is one such phenotype observed in crosses of wheat genotypes involving the R gene Lr13 and complementary genes, Ne1 and Ne2, occurring in different allelic forms. It was recently concluded that Lr13 and an allele of Ne2 are actually the same gene based on genetic and mutational studies. The capability of Lr13 to confer both leaf rust resistance and hybrid necrosis cannot be answered without first cloning it. The lack of tightly linked markers coupled with the proximal 2BS chromosomal location of Lr13 does not make it easily amenable to map-based cloning. The NGS-based pipeline MutRenSeq (mutagenesis and R-gene enrichment sequencing) was used on EMS (Ethyl methanesulfonate) induced, susceptible Lr13 mutants along with support from comparative genomics to ascertain candidate gene sequences for Lr13, which are at advanced stages of screening and confirmation. Definite proof that a single gene is involved will only come with transformation studies when the cloned Lr13 candidate transformed into a susceptible line confers both a resistance phenotype in the transgenic line and a necrotic phenotype in the offspring of crosses between the transgenic line and a line possessing Ne1.

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Resistance to aphids in synthetic hexaploid wheat derived lines

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Leonardo A. Crespo-Herrera CIMMYT
Ravi P Singh, Julio Huerta-Espino

Aphids are major pests of wheat, able to cause up to 40% yield reduction solely due to direct feeding and up to 60% when feeding is combined with the transmission of viral diseases. Wheat resistance to aphids has proven to be effective in protecting yields and also in reducing the transmission rate of viral diseases. Moreover, aphid resistance is fundamental to reduce the negative impacts that the indiscriminate use of insecticides have on the environment and human health. In this study we report the results derived from the evaluation of 326 synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) derived lines against the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum [Rondai]). Primary SHWs were crossed with CIMMYT elite lines and further selected in the breeding pipeline. Therefore, such lines have acceptable agronomic characteristics for its further use in breeding programs. The 326 SHW derived lines were evaluated at seedling stage, in five augmented incomplete blocks, arranged in split-plots, with two treatments (infested vs. non-infested) and with resistant and susceptible checks replicated 16 times. The measured variables were chlorophyll content with a SPAD meter and a visual damage score in a scale 0-100 was also taken. Measurements were recorded when the susceptible check was dead due to aphid feeding. The evaluations were repeated two times for confirmation. Our results indicate the presence of genetic variation for S. graminum resistance. We identified about 4 % of the lines to carry high levels of resistance against this aphid. These lines are currently used in CIMMYT's bread wheat breeding program to incorporate the resistance in elite germplasm.

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Mining of hulled wheat species for yield gain in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vikas Venu Kumaran ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Regional Station, Wellington, The Nilgiris, Tamilnadu, India
SIVASAMY,MURUGASAMY, JAYAPRAKASH, PARAMASIVAM, RAJESH KUMAR, MEENA, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccum L.), tetraploid species (AABB) and spelt wheat (Triticum spelta L.), hexaploid species (AABBDD) are old world hulled wheat species cultivated centuries ago in different parts of the world. These species were later replaced by higher yielding bread and durum wheat in the last centuries. Grain yield is influenced by grain number per unit area and grain size which correlates positively with grain weight. Increasing the grain number was extensively and intensively explored in the past 100 years of wheat breeding which has nearly reached to saturation and leaves little room for further yield increase due to grain number?grain size trade off. Grain size/grain weight is believed to be major driving force for further improvement of wheat yield. Both the species have been characterised with larger grain size and higher grain weight; therefore an ideal source to improve the grain size/grain weight while maintaining the grain number per spike in the cultivated bread wheat. A total of 25 accessions each of emmer and spelt wheat with good grain size and weight were crossed with 5 elite bread wheat lines. In the F2 generation, recombinant lines with good grain size, higher grain weight and grains number were further backcrossed with bread wheat. Stable lines with free threshing were obtained at BC4F4 generations and were analysed for quality. Thousand grain weight (TGW) and harvest index (HI) ranged from 46-55g and 0.47-0.58 in stable lines respectively. Stable lines yielded 16-21% than the high yielding check while number of grains per spike was maintained as that of check. Stable lines involving spelt crosses have higher grain size, TGW and HI than emmer wheat crosses. Stable lines could be released directly as cultivar or else used as one of the parents in the wheat improvement programme.

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