All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 51 - 60 of 415 records | 6 of 42 pages

Preliminary results on stem rust disease in a winter wheat landrace population from Central and Western Asia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Kadir Akan Ahi Evran University, Agriculture Faculty, Plant Protection Department K?rsehir/Turkey
Nilofer Akci, Marta da Silva Lopes

Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) is a fungal disease that can significantly reduce wheat yields and quality. The goal of this study was to screen 281 winter bread wheat landraces genotypes for their reaction to stem rust disease in seedling and adult plant stage.
For seedling stage, the experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions in Field Crops Central Research Institute in Ankara, Turkey during 2017 growing season. The genotypes were grown at 20?4?C under greenhouse condition and inoculated (avirulent on Sr24, 26, 27, and 31 resistance genes) with urediniospores in mineral oil suspension at Zadoks growth stage 11 or 12. After inoculation, the genotypes were incubated at 20?1?C with 100% humidity during 24 hours then at 18-25?C. Scoring took place after 14 days using a 0-4 scale. Infection types on the susceptible checks (cv. Gun-91 and Thatcher) were 3+ scores. For adult plant reactions, the genotypes were screened under natural epidemic conditions for Pgt (virulent on Sr5, 6, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9g, 10, 30, Tmp and Mcn resistance genes) in Seydiler-Kastamonu, Turkey. The materials were sown in a one-meter row with three replications. Stem rust development on each entry was scored using the modified Cobb scale (Little Club had reached 80-100S) in August 2017. Coefficients of infections were calculated and values below 20 were considered to be resistant.
Two (1%) (Seedling stage) genotypes and 15 (5%) (Adult stage) genotypes were resistant to Pgt. The resistance genotypes identified in this study can be used in breeding programs. SNP markers will be identified for stem rusts resistance identified in the landrace population.

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The complementary stripe rust resistance gene Yr73 appears to act in a complementary manner with an unidentified gene on chromos

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Robert Park The University of Sydney
Davinder Singh, Peter Dracatos

Following the introduction of wheat stripe rust into Australia in 1979, an uncharacterized resistance (YrA) was identified in both Australian and International spring wheats. Genetic analyses of YrA indicated it was a pair of complementary genes, which were mapped to chromosomes 3DL and 5BL and designated Yr73 and Yr74, respectively. While selection Avocet 'R' carries both genes, selection Avocet 'S' carries Yr73 only. P. triticina pathotype (pt.) 104-1,2,3,(6),(7),11 +Lr37 ("104-VPM"), first detected in Australia in 2002, most likely arose via mutation from pt. 104-1,2,3,(6),(7),11 ("104"), with added virulence for Lr37. Interestingly, while both pathotypes are avirulent on Lr13, 104-VPM shows a much lower Infection Type (IT, ";1") than pt. 104 ("X++3") on several genotypes carrying Lr13 (e.g.Avocet 'R', Avocet 'S'). Other Lr13 genotypes (e.g. cv. Hereward) respond similarly to both pts ("X++3"). Genetic analyses of 4 doubled haploid (DH) populations based on intercrosses between Avocet 'R' and genotypes lacking Lr13 segregated in a 1:7 ratio to pt. 104-VPM (";1" : all other ITs). Two populations fixed for Lr13 (viz. Hereward/ Avocet 'R' and Estica/Avocet 'R') segregated 1:3 to pt. 104-VPM (";1" : all other ITs). This segregation pattern fitted a model where two complementary genes interact with Lr13 to generate the low (IT ";1") IT. Mapping of a Teal/Avocet 'R' DH population using 92 lines and 9,035 DArT-Seq markers identified three QTLs: chromosome 2BS (Lr13); chromosome 3DL (co-located with Yr73); chromosome 1DS. These results suggest that Yr73 acts in a complementary manner with a gene on chromosome 1DS to confer leaf rust resistance (IT "X"), and that these complementary genes are additive with Lr13. It appears that Yr73 is a modifier of two independent genes in wheat, one conferring resistance to stripe rust (Yr74 on chromosome 5BL), and one conferring resistance to leaf rust (LrAv on chromosome 1DS).

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Potential of conservation agriculture for cereal-based sustainable farming systems and scaling up in eastern Indo-Gangetic plains

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Resona Simkhada Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Nepal
Dipendra Pokharel, Thakur Prasad Tiwari, Mahesh Gathala, Hari Krishna Shrestha

Conservation agricultural practices have been found to be climate and labor smart, and sustainable, agricultural production technologies. The decline in productivity, increase in the cost of cultivation, labor intensive practice affected the cereal based farming system in Nepal particularly at the Indo-Gangetic plains. SRFSI has been working in response to concerns about the sustainability of the cereal based farming system at Sunsari and Dhanusha district of Nepal. This study was conducted to assess the adoption and scaling up of conservation agriculture in addition to input usage, production, net profit, B:C ratio, labour use, etc. of CA practice in Sunsari district, eastern Indo-Gangetic plains of Nepal. The study employed structured questionnaires survey and key informant survey as the main data collection tools. Project reports were taken as secondary data. The primary data related for the semi-annual report and annual report of the SRFSI project were collected jointly by the DADO, Sunsari and RARST, Tarahara. Study revealed that farmers had several tangible advantages and getting higher productivity through these practices. This study assessed the potential of CA based practices in Rice-Wheat and Rice-Maize farming system to improve the yields, net profit for sustainability of the cereal based farming system.

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Molecular screening and identification the carriers of effective Yr genes in wheat germplasm of Central Asia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Alma Kokhmetova Institute of Plant Biology and Biotechnology
Makpal Atishova, Aygul Madenova, Kanat Galymbek, Jenis Keyshilov, Hafiz Muminjanov, Alexey Morgounov

Wheat rust diseases are a major cause of yield losses of this crop. Yellow (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) rust is of the most widespread and dangerous disease of wheat and is the major factor that adversely affects wheat yield and quality. The use of genetic host resistance is the most effective, economical and environmentally safe method of controlling stripe rust that allows elimination of fungicides and minimize crop losses from this disease. Due to the threat of the development of epiphytoties of rust disease it is necessary to identify new donors of resistance to yellow rust and to develop resistant wheat breeding material. In the present study, attention was drawn to the effective yellow rust resistance genes Yr5, Yr10 and Yr15, which were identified in the process of molecular screening of wheat germplasm. Genetic analysis using S23M41 molecular marker linked to Yr5 revealed the presence of this gene in 17 out of 136 promising lines. Thirteen genotypes screened with Xbarc8 generated the DNA fragment associated with Yr15. Three advanced lines with Yr10 were identified using the SCAR marker. Three lines carrying two Yr genes (Yr5 and Yr15) were detected. Combination of Yr5 and Yr10 were found in 15 wheat lines. We identified a number of wheat genotypes highly resistant to stripe rust, which could be further evaluated to release new resistant varieties or to be used in the breeding program.

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Wild grass as a reservoir of Fusarium graminearum and source of inoculum

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Michael Fulcher Cornell University
James Winans, Julian Garcia, Kellie Damann, Gary Bergstrom

In addition to causing Fusarium head blight of wheat and other cereals, Fusarium graminearum is associated with dozens of wild or weedy grass species. Their role in the disease cycle and evolution of the pathogen has not been established despite their widespread distribution. A three-year survey of wild grasses in New York (USA) found that inflorescences and overwintered stems were frequently colonized by F. graminearum. Through a series of controlled laboratory experiments, wheat and five common grass species were compared for their potential to support inoculum production. Artificially infested stem tissue from several grasses both retained F. graminearum at higher rates through a single winter and supported greater ascospore production per dry gram than wheat. Susceptibility of these species to root and crown rot was measured with a modified seed germination assay and a diverse panel of F. graminearum isolates. Differences were seen between host species, and some grasses were resistant to infection. Our results indicate that wild grass species may support significant F. graminearum inoculum production while differing in their suitability for root and crown colonization. Studying interactions between F. graminearum and alternative host plants can improve our understanding of evolution in a broad host range pathogen and our ability to predict the risk of crop epidemics. We are currently evaluating isolates collected from wild grasses for mycotoxin production and aggressiveness on wheat.

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Sowing seeds of prosperity

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Kanan Vijayaraghavan Sathguru Management Consultants
Venugopal Chintada, Vijay Paranjape, Mansi Naithani, Aishwarya Vardhan

Nepal is an important wheat producer country in the South Asian region; with wheat being the third most important crop in the country after paddy (rice) and maize. Additionally, high-quality, disease free, processed seed is vital to establishing food security in South Asia. The Agriculture and Forestry University or AFU, located in the fertile Chitwan region of Nepal, is the only agriculture university catering to the needs of the Terai region and has the capability to provide innovative wheat seed solutions for small wheat-growing farmers. In the Delivering Genetic Gain Project or DGGW, the AFU has an active involvement in seed production, processing, and distribution. These activities play a major role in human capacity building in the country involving women empowerment, whole family participation in varietal selection and entrepreneurship for sustainable livelihood and overall development. Currently, under the DGGW?s Innovative Seed System in Nepal, AFU produces and aggregates seeds from farmers in the area and process it through a new seed processing unit, which is a cost-efficient version of machines commonly seen in larger agricultural facilities. At full capacity, the unit can operate up to 18 hours a day and process one ton of seed per hour. The unit it is also capable of processing rice and maize during other cropping seasons. By March 2017, more than 200 farmers applied to be part of the inaugural cohort of farmers trained in producing disease free wheat seed. The inaugural wheat season for the Seed Systems for Nepal Initiative has concluded successfully, with a total of 14 metric tons of disease-free wheat seed processed. The DGGW Seeds Systems for Nepal Initiative envisions to increase the number of empowered farmers next season, which commences on November, 2017.

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Population dynamics of wheat stem rust fungus in Indian subcontinent during 2009-2015

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Subhash Bhardwaj ICAR-IIWBR, Regional Station, Flowerdale,Shimla 171002 H.P. India
Pramod Prasad, OmPrakash Gangwar, Hanif Khan, Siddanna Savadi, Subodh Kumar

Stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici) (Pgt) epidemics have been reported from many wheat growing areas of the world. Stem rust races with virulence to Sr31 (Ug99 type races),are a threat to wheat producing African countries. Currently 11 different variants of the Ug99 lineage have been reported from different countries. Despite no report of Ug99 variants from any of the South Asian countries, the efforts are in place to counter the possible introduction of virulent wheat stem rust races. Stem rust surveillance has been a major component of the rust resistance breeding worldwide. This study reports virulence phenotypes and functional SSR marker based genotypes among stem rust collections in the Indian subcontinent during 2009 to 2015.
Wheat stem rust samples were analyzed on differential sets used for pathotype identification in India. Twelve pathotypes of Pgt were identified in a total of 574 samples analyzed. Pgt pathotypes 40A and 11 were identified in 36% and 32% of the samples, respectively. The stem rust resistance genes Sr7a, Sr26, Sr27, Sr31, Sr32, Sr33, Sr39, Sr40, Sr43, SrTmp and SrTt3 were found to confer resistance to the field population identified during this period. The analysis of SSR marker genotypes data revealed a high degree of variability in the Pgt population, with mean gene diversity and polymorphic information content (PIC) values of 0.56 and 0.50, respectively. STRUCTURE software divided the Pgt populations in to four subpopulations with some admixtures. The FST values of pairs of subpopulations ranged from 0.35 to 0.93 which indicated that the four sub-populations were significantly differentiated. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) determined that 16%, 69% and 15% of the totl variation was between population, among and within individuals, respectively. The information generated here could be a useful guide for resistance breeding and gene deployment programmes for saving South Asian wheat from stem rust.

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Aecial infection status of Berberis spp. in Kastamonu province of Turkey

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Nil?fer Akci Central Research Institute for Field Crops, Yenimahalle, Ankara, Turkey
Aziz Karakaya

Berberis species are important alternate hosts and generate new races of stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici and yellow (stripe) rust fungus Puccinia striiformis. Berberis species are common in Kastamonu province of Turkey. In 2016 and 2017, surveys were conducted in Kastamonu province in order to elucidate aecial infection status of Berberis species in this region. In 2016, the central region and A?l?, Ara?, Daday, ?hsangazi, Seydiler, Ta?k?pr? and Tosya regions and in 2017 central region and Ara?, Daday, Han?n?, P?narba??, Seydiler, Ta?k?pr? and Tosya regions of Kastamonu province were investigated. It appears that there are at least two different Berberis species exist in that area. Berberis species showed variation in terms of fruit color and morphological characters. In 2016, 50 Berberis plants were examined and aecia were present in 38 plants (76%). Percentage of plants parts infected with aecia ranged between 3-80%. In 2017, 64 Berberis plants were examined. Aecia were present in 34 plants (53%). Percentage of plants parts infected with aecia ranged between 3-85%. Aecia were mainly observed on leaves but also observed on other plant parts including flower parts, fruit and young twigs. The role of these aecia and Berberis spp. on rust diseases in Kastamonu province of Turkey should be investigated.

This study was supported by General Directorate of Agricultural Research and Policies, Turkey (Project No: TAGEM-BS-15\12-01\02-02).

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Enhancing crop genetic diversity using crop wild relatives (CWR)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Chetan Patokar International Center for Agriculture Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA)
ahmad amri, El-Haddoury Jamal

Constant climatic change and rapid evolution of diseases and pests have created challenges for plant breeders to find novel sources of resistance within cultivated gene pool. However wild (alien) relatives of crops still carries many promising resistance genes to biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant breeders around the world have successfully attempted to recover some of the beneficial genetic diversity lost (or never included) during the domestication and crop improvement process by crossing cultivated varieties with wild species to introgressed many valuable genes into crops like wheat and barley. This pre-breeding attempt to regain the genetic diversity of crops based on crop wild relatives (CWR) had been started at ICARDA 1994. Furthermore, The Global Crop Diversity Trust (GCDT) recently provided a grant to ICARDA within the Crop Wild Relatives (CWR) project to strengthen the research on use of genetic resources in pre-breeding of barley and grass pea. The pre-breeding activity in barley is focused on transferring genes of resistance to complex diseases and pests (scald, spot blotch and barley gall midge), improving tolerance to drought, heat and salinity, and enhancing the nutritional value through improving Iron and Zinc concentrations and amylases activity. Crosses were made between wild barely H. Vulgare X cultivated barley H. Vulgare subsp. H. spontaneum. The main objective of pre-breeding in Grasspea is transferring genes of low or no ?-ODAP from crossable species L. cicera and L. amphicarpus, L. tingitanus, L. aphaca, L. odoratus, L. sphaericus, L. nissolia, and L. aureus. Interspecific crosses were made between L. sativus x L.cicera followed by embryo rescue. Currently all the pre-breeding lines with targeted traits are under screening against the respective selection pressures using precision phenotyping..

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Triticum araraticum: A source of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance genes

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Rohtas Singh School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 India
Ahmed Elkot, Satinder Kaur, Parveen Chhuneja

Stripe rust and leaf rust are two most widely distributed diseases of wheat despite the fact that major emphasis has been made globally to develop rust resistant varieties. The wild tetraploid wheat Triticum araraticum (AAGG) evolved in the eastern part of Fertile Crescent is a source of useful traits for the improvement of wheat including resistance to disease. T. araraticum acc. pau4692 and a derived advanced backcross introgression line (IL) in susceptible T. durum cv. Malvi local background showed high level of seedling resistance against Indian pathotypes of leaf rust and stripe rust. The F5 Single seed descent (SSD) population developed from the crosses between T. araraticum IL with T. durum cultivar PBW114 was screened with commonly prevalent pathotypes of leaf rust and stripe rust in India at the seedling stage. The genetic analysis indicated that the leaf rust resistance is conditioned by two genes and stripe rust resistance by a single gene. The SSR markers mapped on A and B genome were used for parental polymorphism along with resistant and susceptible bulks for leaf rust and polymorphic markers between bulks were used on the whole population. The molecular marker data using single marker analysis showed that leaf rust resistance genes were mapped on chromosome 2A and 7A linked to SSR markers Xwmc149 and Xbarc49, respectively. The genes have been temporarily named as LrAr1 and LrAr2. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) for mapping stripe rust resistance is in progress.

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