All BGRI Abstracts

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Virulence to Yr10 and Yr24 in Mexican yellow rust fungal population and implications for CIMMYT durum and bread wheat germplasm

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Julio Huerta-Espino INIFAP, Mexico
Ravi Singh, Karim Ammar

Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis tritici (Pst), continues its evolution towards virulence to race-specific resistance genes. Identification of Mexican Pst isolates MEX16-03 and MEX16.04 that changed infection types of Yr10 testers from 1 to 9 and for Yr24 (=Yr26) testers from 3 to 9 indicated that a mutation for virulence to these resistance genes has occurred in a predominant race detected in 2014 and maintained at CIMMYT as MEX14.191 and at INIFAP as CMEX14.25. Isolate MEX14.191 was responsible for the susceptibility of popular varieties Nana F2007 and Luminaria F2014 grown in central Mexican highlands. Isolate MEX16.04 has the following avirulence/virulence formula: Yr1, 5, 15, SP/Yr2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, (17), 24, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32 using the Avocet near-isolines and other known testers. Virulence to Yr10 and Yr24 (=Yr26) were also confirmed by testing seedlings of cultivars Moro (Yr10), Chuanmai 42, and Neimai 836 (Yr24). Seedling tests carried on 200 bread wheat, 550 durum, and 460 synthetic hexaploid wheats with their respective durum parents from CIMMYT collection indicated that MEX16.03 and MEX16.04 do not represent a major threat because a majority of the lines remained resistant to these isolates. However, it is worth mentioning that durum cultivars, such as Khofa, Desert King, Anatoly, Movas, and Llareta INIA, and 10 primary synthetic hexaploid or synthetic-derived bread wheats that were resistant to MEX14.191 became susceptible to MEX16.03 and MEX16.04. Our results indicate that resistance gene Yr10 was absent and Yr24 occurred in low frequency in CIMMYT bread wheat germplasm. A majority of CIMMYT durum wheat possibly carried Yr24 in combination with other effective gene(s).

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Isolation of durable wheat stem rust resistance gene Sr26 and enhancement of its deployment

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Jianping Zhang CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia
Timothy Hewitt, Peng Zhang, Zacharias A. Pretorius, Narayana Upadhyaya, Rohit Mago, Sambasivam Periyannan, Xiuying Kong, Burkhard Steuernagel, Brande H. Wulff, Evans S. Lagudah

Multiple rust resistance gene combinations are considered as a practical solution for providing durable rust resistance and preventing resistance breakdown arising from single gene deployment. The stem rust resistance locus Sr26, originally derived from Thinopyrum ponticum and introgressed into wheat as a chromosome translocation, is one of the very few genes conferring durable resistance for almost 40 years to all known races of stem rust, including the highly virulent stem rust race Ug99 (TTKSK) and its derivatives (Dundas et al. 2015). To understand the underlying mechanisms of its unusual long-term effectiveness and to explore allelic diversity in different Th. ponticum accessions for other functional alleles that may offer new sources of resistance, we used comparative genomics and gene capture techniques (Resistance gene enrichment sequencing, RenSeq) as complementary strategies for isolating the target gene (Steuernage et al. 2016). Sr26 region was first mapped using NB-LRR (Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat) sequences from the orthologous gene members located on the long arm of chromosome 6D from Aegilops tauschii (the D-genome donor of wheat) reference genome. Subsequently, we revealed a cluster of NB-LRR sequences located at the distal end of the Th. ponticum introgression segment that were absent in the smallest interstitial Sr26 deletion mutant. Therefore, we substantially narrowed down the genetic interval for Sr26. In addition to this approach, we subjected the mutant population to RenSeq pipeline. A candidate gene of Sr26 has been successfully identified to be a NBS-LRR type resistance gene. Validation of the gene candidate by complementation studies is currently in progress. In order to enhance durable resistance, genetic stocks of Sr26 from different backgrounds as well as a panel of Sr26-APR (Adult Plant Resistance) gene combinations have been generated to further investigate the resistance response of Sr26 in combination with different multi-pathogen APR genes.

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A large nested association mapping population to map agronomic QTL and smallholder farmers preference in Ethiopian durum wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Matteo Dell'Acqua Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna
Yosef G.,Kidane, Cherinet, Alem, Bogale, Nigir, Dejene, Mengistu, Carlo, Fadda, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Ethiopian plateau hosts thousands of durum wheat landraces cultivated in low input agriculture conducted by an estimated 70 million smallholder farmers. Having thoroughly characterized the phenotypic and molecular uniqueness of Ethiopian durum wheat landraces, we produced a large nested association mapping (NAM) population harnessing their mostly untapped diversity in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RIL). The NAM founders are 50 landraces providing valuable traits such as drought tolerance and resistance to pests, and maximizing molecular diversity. Each selected landrace was crossed to a durum wheat line with an international background (Asassa), establishing independent interconnected bi-parental families, for a total of 6,280 RILs currently in F8. The Ethiopian NAM is at once i) a powerful QTL mapping tool that will side the increasing availability of genomic tools in wheat towards high-throughput candidate genes identification, and ii) a large pre-breeding panel closing the gap between local and international materials. Here we discuss the molecular and phenotypic characterization of twelve NAM families, represented by 100 RILs each. The 1,200 NAM RIL showed elevated allelic variation and a genetic structure reminiscent of the breeding design followed. The NAM RILs were phenotyped for ten agronomic and five disease traits in multiple locations in the Ethiopian highlands. A quantitative method eliciting smallholder farmers traditional knowledge was used to record local farmers appreciation of NAM RILs in all phenotyping locations. We report that the superior genetic properties of the NAM can be used to map QTL for both agronomic and farmer traits with unprecedented precision. The most promising NAM RILs can be identified combining farmers appreciation and agronomic measures, and prioritized for introgression of Ethiopian landraces traits in breeding pipelines aiming at higher uptake and productivity in local agriculture.

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Large scale wheat stem rust outbreaks in Western Siberia / Northern Kazakhstan in 2015-2017

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vladimir Shamanin Omsk State Agricultural University, Omsk, Russia
Elena Salina, Yuriy Zelenskiy, Alma Kokhmetova, Mehran Patpour, Mogens Hovmøller, Pablo Olivera, Les Szabo, Yue Jin, Marcel Meyer, Chris Gilligan, Matthew Hort, Dave Hodson, Alexey Morgunov

Short season, high latitude spring wheat is grown on 7 million ha in Western Siberia and 10 million ha in Northern Kazakhstan. Despite relatively low wheat yields (1.5 t/ha), the region is extremely important for regional and global food security. Leaf rust dominates, occurring three years out of five, especially in favorable years with higher rainfall. Since 2010, stem rust has been observed at an increasing number of sites. The first large-scale stem rust outbreak occurred in 2015 and affected about 0.5-1 million ha in Omsk, Western Siberia. In 2016, 2 million ha were affected in the Omsk and Altay regions, while 1 million ha in the Kostanay and Northern Kazakhstan regions were affected in 2017. Estimated yield losses reached 25-35% each year. Factors associated with the outbreaks included: higher rainfall in late June and July; cultivation of susceptible varieties; and an increased area planted to winter wheat, which serves as a source of inoculum. Sampling and race analysis revealed a diverse pathogen population, indicative of a sexual recombination. A total of 51 races were identified from 31 samples taken in 2015 and 2016. All races were avirulent on Sr31. The majority of varieties released and cultivated in the region are susceptible to stem rust and require replacing. A recent study of 150 local resistant varieties and breeding lines indicated that the genetic basis of resistance was limited to Sr25, Sr31, Sr36, Sr6Ai, Sr6Ai#2, and additional unknown major genes. Adult-plant resistance to stem rust was observed in less than 20% of the germplasm. The potential impact of these large stem rust outbreaks on other wheat growing regions is being investigated by analyzing spore wind dispersal patterns. Further research is required to understand and mitigate the sudden appearance of stem rust as a disease of economic importance.
Study at Omsk State Agrarian University was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project No. 16-16-10005).

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Identification and characterization of winter wheat germplasm resistant to stem rust in Kenya and Turkey

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Beyhan Akin International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Nilufer,Akci, Sridhar, Bhavani, Mesut, Keser, Fatih, Ozdemir, Ruth, Wanyera, Alexey, Morgounov, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A diverse set of winter wheat germplasm was screened for resistance to stem rust in large-scale trials in Kenya and Turkey during 2009-16. The study aimed to select resistant material and characterize types of resistance and possible genes, as well as evaluate agronomic traits and resistance to other diseases to select superior variety candidates and parental lines. The study material was comprised of various Facultative and Winter Wheat Observation Nurseries (FAWWON), which are developed and distributed by the International Winter Wheat Improvement Program (www.iwwip.org) in Turkey. More than 1600 global accessions were screened, with most evaluated for two years. Based on stem rust data from Kenya, more than 400 genotypes were identified exhibiting adequate levels of resistance to the Ug99 race group. The highest number of resistant lines originated from IWWIP (~170), USA (~100), Russia (~40), Iran (~30), Romania (~20), and South Africa (~20). Material was also tested at two sites in Turkey: Haymana (artificial inoculation) and Kastamonu (natural infection). There was no significant correlation between stem rust severities in Kenya and in Turkey, due to differences in stem rust pathotypes. However, a set of germplasm (more than 100 entries) has been identified as resistant in both countries. This set represents promising material as variety candidates and parental lines; another study is currently identifying the genes controlling the stem rust resistance in this population. IWWIP distributed stem rust resistant germplasm to its global collaborators during 2010-2015, in response to the threat from the Ug99 race group. New resistant germplasm combining broad adaptation, high yields, and resistance to other diseases is available on request.

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Race analysis of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici led to identification of the new race TTKTK, affecting Sr31 and SrTmp, in Iran

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ramin Roohparvar Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Agricultural Research Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
Ali Omrani

The basidiomycetous fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) causes stem rust disease as one of the most destructive wheat pathogens, worldwide. TTKSK and other Pgt races under Ug99 race group are considered as major threats to wheat production in east Africa and CWANA region by defeating the stem rust resistance gene Sr31, while its ineffectiveness was reported in Iran in 2007. Race TKTTF of Pgt caused a severe stem rust epidemic in southern Ethiopia in 2013, and was spread to Europe through 2016 Sicily outbreak. This research describes race identification of Iranian isolates collected during the widespread distribution of stem rust in 2014-16. Purified urediniospores of 123 Pgt isolates were separately inoculated on seedlings of 20 North American differential wheat cultivars carrying different Sr resistance gene/s. Infection types were recorded at 14 days post inoculation (dpi) using Stakman et al. 0-4 scale. Based on the letter code nomenclature, we identified the Pgt races TKTTF, TTTTF, TTKSK, TTKTK, PKTTF, TKSTF, PKSTF, PKTTC, PTRTF, PTTTF, PKSTC, TTRTF, TKSTC and PKRTF in Iran. TKTTF and TTTTF were determined as prevalent Iranian Pgt races. This is the first report of race TTKTK, a new variant of Ug99 race group with virulence on Sr31 and SrTmp resistance genes, in Iran. Since TTKTK primarily occurred in south west of Iran, the migration route for this new race seems to be similar to race TTKSK. The high race variation observed in this study could indicate a high genetic diversity among P. graminis f. sp. tritici populations in Iran, as a wheat center of origin.

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Pathogenic diversity in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from Pakistan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Javed Iqbal Mirza Crop Diseases Research Institute, PARC Substation, Murree Pakistan
Sufyan,Muhammad, Abid Majeed, Satti, Munir, Anjum, Fayyaz, Muhammad, Atiq ur Rehman, Rattu, Imtiaz, Muhammad, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

225 Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici isolates collected from wheat growing areas of Pakistan during 2013-2016 were analyzed using 18 near isogenic yellow rust differentials. Seventy eight races were identified among collection in which 20 were common (n > 2). Rest of the races were very rare and encountered only once (n=1). Races 574212, 574232, 474232, 474233, 574213 and 434232 were most frequent (n> 15). Pathogenic diversity analysis of the collection reveal high diversity (H =3.57) of the P. striiformis population of pakistan. On the basis of phenotypic response to yellow rust genes, the most frequent races could be grouped into 5 diverse groups. Distinct grouping was also observed in rarely encountered isolates. Most of the races were highly complex and 80% isolates had complexity ranging from 8 to 11. Virulence frequency for Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr17, Yr27, Yr43 & YrExp2 remained above 80% while that of Yr1, Yr9 and Yr44 remained over 40%. Partial virulence was detected for Yr5, while virulence to Yr10, Yr15, YrSP was found in < 4% isolates. Paper discuss spatial and temporal distribution of P. striiformis races in Pakistan.

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Occurrence of the Warrior Race of Wheat Stripe Rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in Egypt, 2015

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Atef Shahin Wheat Disease Research Department, Plant Pathology Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Egypt.
Wasif Youssif, Mohamed Hasan

Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, [Pst] is a widespread and damaging disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), causing significant losses in yield and quality. During the 2015, eight stripe rust physiological races were identified in greenhouse tests i.e. 0E0, 6E4, 70E20, 128E28, 134E244, 143E245, 250E174, and 450E214. Race 0E0 was the most common and avirulent race, and races 143E245, and 450E214 had high virulence on most of tested Yr resistance gene wheat lines. In the same season, an unusual stripe rust infection occurred in spring wheat at Sakha region in Egypt. Some of the most important commercial cultivars such as (Misr 2, Giza 168 and Sakha 61), known as resistant to the previously characterized races of Pst in Egypt have become susceptible under field conditions. Infections of stripe rust was observed on some wheat lines with Yr genes previously known to be resistant, such as Yr1, Yr17 and Yr32, in a yellow-rust trap nursery at Sakha (30.601400? N, 31.510383? E), northern Egypt. Independent race analysis of collected samples from four governorates i.e. Kafrelsheikh, Al-Sharqia, Dakahleia and Damietta at Sakha Agricultural Research Station in Kafrelsheikh confirmed the detection of a new Pst race in Egypt. Aggressive races with virulence to Yr27 were detected on differentials with Yr27 (Yr27/6*Avocet S), and (Ciano 97) during the 2012 in Egypt. In addition, the Warrior race (virulent on: Yr1, Yr2, Yr3, Yr4, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9, Yr17, Yr25, Yr32, and YrSp) was observed in the 2015 crop season, which indicated continued changes in the Pst the population. In Europe, the Warrior race first identified in 2011 in the United Kingdom, has caused significant change in yellow rust susceptibility of several varieties of both wheat and triticale. In a conclusion, some of wheat cultivars, known to be resistant, were shifted to susceptible due to these new races.

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Evaluation of Ethiopian wheat germplasm for resistance to four virulent Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici races

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Bekele Hundie Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research
Bedada Girma, Endale Hailu, Fikrte Yirga, Bekele Abeyo, Gordon Cisar, Gina Brown-Guedira, Erena Edae, Pablo Olivera, Matthew Rouse

In Ethiopia, breeding resistant wheat varieties is a priority for wheat rust management although new virulent rust races have periodically resulted in losses of R-genes, epidemic outbreaks, and yield losses of up to 100%. During 2014 and 2015, 160 wheat varieties and lines including five checks and 12 differential lines with known resistance genes were evaluated against four stem rust pathogen races at both seedling and adult plant stages. In the field at Kulumsa, Ethiopia, the lines were evaluated in four separate nurseries in an augmented design where each nursery was inoculated with a different Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race: TTKSK, TKTTF, TRTTF, and JRCQC. Kingbird, a check variety, displayed low average Area Under the Disease Progress Curve (AUDPC) (67 to 238) and Average Coefficient of Infection (ACI) (1.1 to 9.7) in response to the four races. Effect of lines possessing Sr24+Sr36 and Sr31+Sr36 resistance genes on rust development was comparable to Kingbird or even better. Likewise, 48, 34, 19 and 28 varieties and lines had lower or comparable AUDPC for TTKSK, TKTTF, TRTTF and JRCQC compared to Kingbird. Commercial bread wheat varieties Shorima, Huluka, Hogana, and advanced lines CIMMYT 14, ETBW7058, ETBW7101 and ETBW7258 for which Sr24/Lr24 was postulated, possessed AUDPC and ACI lower than Kingbird. However, all these lines possessed susceptible or intermediate seedling reactions to Sr24-virulent race TTKTT from Kenya at the seedling stage. CIMMYT 18 showed susceptibility to 3 races at seedling stage, but lower AUDPC and ACI than the checks except Kingbird, indicating adult plant resistance. However, this adult plant resistance was marginal in effect to race TKTTF. Resistance genes Sr2, Sr57/Lr34, Sr24/Lr24, Sr25/Lr19, Sr38/Lr37 and SrTmp were postulated at various frequencies in this germplasm. Seedling and adult plant resistance sources identified can be used for rust resistance breeding in Ethiopia.

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A systematic genetic and genomics approach to achieve durable rust resistances in wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Wentao Zhang National Research Council of Canada (NRC)-Saskatoon
Kerry Boyle, Tammy Francis, Peng Gao, Brittany Polley, Christine Sidebottom, Brent McCallum, Harpinder Randhawa, Tom Fetch, Randy Kutcher, Sylvie Cloutier, Pierre R. Fobert

Most rust resistant genes in wheat are race-specific (R), with relatively few genes conferring resistance only at the adult stage that have been described as slow rusting genes (APR). Pyramiding multiple R, APR or APR+R genes has been used successfully over many years to achieve durable rust resistance. To further enhance this strategy, a genetic genomics approach was exploited to identify genes with different resistant mechanisms and the most effective gene pyramids.
Several new combinations of rust genes were created and tested in the Thatcher background, revealing synergistic ("booster") effects involving Lr21 with Lr16. With QTL mapping approach, we found that genes combined from 7D, 1B and 7B conferred an almost immune response to leaf rust, while genes from 7D, 1B and 3B provided an almost immune response to stripe rust. With a genomics approach, a large scale transcriptome analysis was conducted on key rust resistant genes including six R genes, three APR genes and one gene pyramid with Lr34+Lr16 over a time series during the infection process of both seedlings and adult plants. Detailed transcriptome analysis of gene expression associated with different major and minor leaf rust genes, alone or in combination, identified common and unique aspects of defense responses. For example, Lr9 is different from the other three leaf rust genes tested, with resistance triggered at a very early stage, consistent with pre-haustorial resistance. R genes Lr21 and Lr16 were also significantly different compared to other R and APR genes. With gene co-expression network analysis, a shared unique gene module mediated by Lr34 and Lr67 was also identified. This large transcriptome dataset also allowed the development of a rust-wheat interactome atlas for rust functional genomics research in wheat.

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