All BGRI Abstracts

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Three years of the Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platform for diseases in Uruguay: current status and future prospects

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Gustavo Azzimonti Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (INIA), Estaci?n La Estanzuela, Ruta 50, Km 11, Colonia, Uruguay
Vanesa,Domeniguini, N?stor, Gonz?lez, Richard, Garcia, Carolina, Saint-Pierre, Pawan, Singh, Mart?n, Quincke, Silvia, Pereyra, Silvia, Germ?n, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Since 2014 CGIAR-WHEAT Program has promoted the establishment of a network of field-based Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platforms (PWPP) to expand the existing collaborations between CIMMYT, ICARDA and National Agricultural Research System partners. The main goals are improving the quality of data collected and shared among institutions to enhance and accelerate the international wheat breeding, and promote synergism with the private sector and nongovernmental organizations. In 2015, the PWPP-Uruguay was established to test genotypes for multiple diseases: leaf rust, Fusarium head blight and Septoria tritici blotch. These diseases are phenotyped each year in separate field trials artificially inoculated with pathogen isolates identified as representatives of the pathogen regional population. Wheat material is sowed in plots with susceptible checks every 50 entries. Disease severity and other variables related to the disease development are measured using standard international scales at dates when the expression of plant resistance is optimal. In the first three years of the platform, more than 1500 genotypes were screened per year. These materials had diverse origins (more than eight institutions, public and private, from eight countries) and diverse types: from recent commercialized to ancient cultivars, advanced lines, International CIMMYT nurseries, mapping populations or panels. Highly resistant genotypes to multiple diseases could be selected. At the present time, we are developing and adopting advanced phenotyping methods, combining remote sensing and image analysis, and exploring their adaptation to breeding constraints. Also, extension activities as internships, training courses and student projects are being developed. Major future prospects are the enhancement of data and germplasm exchange between platform partners and the PWPP network and the involvement in collaborative phenotyping/genotyping breeding projects.

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Structural insights into impact of Y134F mutation and identification of fungicidal compounds against CYP51 in Puccinia triticina

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Bharati Pandey Panjab University Chandigarh
Pradeep Sharma

Sterol 14?-Demethylase Cytochrome P450 (CYP51) protein involved in ergosterol biosynthesis pathways is a crucial target for efficient fungicidal compounds. However, the recognition mechanism and dynamic behavior of CYP51 in wheat leaf rust pathogen, Puccinia triticina is still obscure. Previously, a mutation at codon 134 (Y134F) was reported in five European isolates of P. triticina, the structural basis of this mutation remain unclear. To address this problem, CYP51 wild type protein and its variant proteins were successfully modeled using I-TASSER, an ab initio based structure prediction pipeline. To gain valuable insights into structure-function behavior for the binding wild-type and mutant-type proteins, individually generated protein models was subjected to 50ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations run. Observably, this comparative protein-ligand interaction analysis and binding free energy results revealed that impact of mutation on the thermodynamics and conformational stability of the CYP51 protein is negligible. In present study, we carried out structure-based molecular docking and identified potent novel fungicidal compounds from four different databases and libraries. Consequently through MD simulation and thermodynamic integration, four novel compounds such as CoCoCo54211 (CoCoCo database),ZINC04089470(ZINC database), Allyl pyrocatechol 3,4 diacetate (Natural compound library) and 9-octadecenoic acid (Traditional Chinese Medicine database) has been predicted as potent fungicidal compound against CYP51 with XPGlidedocking score of -11.41, -12.52, -7.40 and -7.55 kcal/mol, respectively. These compounds were found to directly bond to heme group of CYP51, subsequently disturbing the stability and survival of fungus and can be used to control leaf rust in wheat.

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Status and strategies for averting the threat of yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend.) in North Indian states

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
D. P. Singh ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research
Sudheer Kumar, P.L. Kashyap, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Yellow rust of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. is one of the important diseases of wheat in India. In north Indian states it spreads quite fast due to favourable temperature and moisture prevailing in these states during major part of crop growth (November-mid March). In spite of favourable weather, proactive survey and surveillance and advisories issued in time resulted successful management of yellow rust in India during past four decades. Even large scale cultivation of varieties like HD 2967 in about 12 million ha past two years did not result any losses. Three spots of initial foci near foot hills in Punjab have been identified and are monitored regularly. Any sign of yellow rust is controlled effectively with the foliar sprays of fungicides like propiconazole @ 0.1%. Use of mobiles phones and internet services is regularly done for transfer of information on wheat crop health and suggestions for proper management. Strategic planting and sowing of wheat in which newly released high yielding yellow rust varieties helped in reducing the yellow rust inculum build up. Regular monitoring of wheat health via weather forecasts take place after every fortnight from December to March. During 2016-17 crop season, yellow rust was effectively managed and its occurrence was delayed in Punjab, Haryana and Uttarakhand states. Two new pathotypes, 110S 119 and 110S 84 developed recently were used for evaluation of entries of wheat yield trials during 2016-17 at hot spot locations. The new varieties in pipe line of identification and release are tested against yellow rust. The most critical period for yellow rust management remained from December till mid February.

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Functional genomics of thermal stress tolerance in Indian wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Paramjit Khurana University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi

Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of heat stress tolerance, we have analyzed heat stressed substractive cDNA libraries and undertaken genome-wide transcriptome exploration for genes associated with spike photosynthetic efficiency during thermal stress. The photosynthetic efficiencies of Aegilops tauschii and Ae. speltoides were also compared. While the former displayed nearly complete recovery of PSII, the adverse effect was more pronounced in the latter. Functional characterization of heat stress-associated transcription factors and thermal stress-associated proteins was also undertaken e.g. TaHSF, TabZIP, TaZnF and TaMIPS, and TaLTPs in the Indian wheat germplasm. Functional characterization of the three heat stress transcription factors was upregulated under high temperatures and other abiotic stresses. They also showed early flowering and better performance with respect to their growth and yield after heat stress. Additionally, we have identified various interacting components associated with thermal stress-mediated plant signaling partners during thermal stress.

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EMS derived changes in susceptibility to P. triticina in wheat.

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
John Fellers USDA-ARS HWWGRU

P. triticina has a biotrophic relationship with wheat and needs certain elements from the wheat host for a successful life cycle. In recent years, several long lasting, minor resistance genes have been cloned, and their function suggests that the resistance is not due to a classic NB-LRR gene, but a gene that functions in a biotrophic pathway. The hypothesis was proposed that modification of a susceptibility gene can provide broad, long lasting resistance. To test this hypothesis, Thatcher was treated with EMS and screened for changes in susceptibility. M5 lines were evaluated in the greenhouse with BBBD Race 1 and 5 lines were identified. Also, M5 lines were planted in the field to verify the resistance and test the resistance effectiveness to natural infections of P. triticina. The same five lines were resistant in the field. Resistance ranged from few pustules, a race specific-like reaction, lesion mimics with few or no pustules, and near immunity. These lines were backcrossed to Thatcher, and resistant F2 plants were bulked and sequenced. Gene candidates will be identified and discussed.

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Economic impact of front line demonstrations on wheat in the Semi-Arid tropics of western Maharashtra, India

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vijendra Baviskar Agharkar Research Institute Pune
Vijendra Baviskar, Balgounda Honrao, yashavanthakumar kakanur, Vilas Surve, Deepak Bankar, Vitthal Gite, Ajit Chavan, Vijay Khade, Juned Bagwan, Shrikant Khairanar, Sameer Raskar

Frontline demonstrations (FLDs,) on wheat were conducted by Agharkar Research Institute, Pune, during last five rabi seasons from 2012-13 to 2016-17 at farmer's fields of Pune and Satara district under wheat growing area of semi-arid tropics of western Maharashtra, India. Before conducting FLDs, a group meeting held every year in the selected village and specific skill training had imparted to the randomly selected farmers regarding adoption of different improved aspects of cultivation. FLDs comprised of improved wheat varieties viz., MACS 6222, MACS 6478, MACS 3125 (d) and MACS 2971(dic) for Peninsular Zone of India. About 50 ha of FLDs on improved wheat varieties were conducted with active participation of 50 farmers covered an average of 10 farmers and 10 ha per year. Two recent varieties, MACS 6222 and MACS 6478 had shown higher grain yield, ranging between 15 to 55 per cent more over local check and farmer practice than all other FLDs. Recommended packages and practices of wheat FLDs gave higher value of yield, net return and high benefit cost ratio as compared to local check over the years of study. The study has revealed that five years mean extension gap of 4.48 to 9.67 q/ha and technology gap ranging between 11.00 to 22.22 q/ha depending on the variety during the period of study. Net returns of Rs. 63042/ha was observed from improved practice than in the farmer's practice of Rs. 50108/ha and with benefit cost ratio of 3.07 and 2.79 respectively. On average basis, the incremental benefit cost ratio was found as 2.83. In frontline demonstrations, the yield potential of wheat has been enhanced largely due to the increase in the knowledge of farming community and adoption of improved production techniques by farmers.

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Development of adapted wheat lines resistant to Ug99+ with combinations of Sr26, Sr32 and Sr39

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Silvina Baraibar Instituto Nacional de Investigaci?n Agropecuaria (INIA) La Estanzuela
Paula Silva, Clara Pritsch, Miguel Raffo, Silvia Pereyra, Silvia German

Wheat stem rust (SR), caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, (Pgt) is considered one of the most destructive diseases of the wheat crop. As Sr24 and Sr31 are the most widely used resistance genes in the Southern Cone of America, wheat crops in this region is under threat of SR outbreaks posed by the potential migration of virulent Pgt Ug99-lineage races (Ug99+). Efforts have to be made to develop adapted lines resistant to Ug99+. Genes Sr26, Sr32 and Sr39 are effective to both Ug99+ and local races of the pathogen. This work is aimed to pyramid two and three of the resistance genes in two locally adapted wheat cultivars (G?nesis 2375 and G?nesis 6.87). Donor lines of Sr26, Sr32 and Sr39 (developed by I. Dundas, University of Adelaide, Australia) and molecular markers Sr26#43, csSr32#1 and Sr39#22r (developed by R. Mago et al., University of Adelaide) were used. Lines with two-gene combinations were developed in two steps. First, tree-way crosses were made by crossing heterozygous F1 plants (derived from crossings donor lines) to either one of the two adapted wheat cultivars. Subsequently, tree-way F1 plants were genotyped and only those with two-gene combinations were backcrossed (BC) twice to the adapted cultivars. Among three-way F1 plants, two-genes combinations were confirmed for Sr26+Sr32 (8 out of 31), Sr26+Sr39 (2 of 115) and Sr32+Sr39 (26 out of 103). In the BC1F1 generation, Sr26+Sr32, Sr26+Sr39 and Sr32+Sr39 combinations corresponded with 9, 9 and 45 out of 99, 27 and 241 plants, respectively. In 2017, 1345 BC2F1 plants are being grown to obtain BC2F2. We plan to intercross plants with two-gene combinations to obtain lines with the three genes which will be used as sources of resistance to develop cultivars with presumably longer lasting resistance to wheat SR.

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Increase in surveillance activities in SAARC region through streamlined efforts and enhanced tool box

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vijay Paranjape Sathguru Management Consultants
Kanan Vijayaraghavan, Venugopal Chintada, Rituparna Majumder, Richa Kapur, K. Aishwariya Varadan

South Asia has the highest "wheat dependent" low income community in the world. Stem rust and blast are recognized as the most damaging disease of wheat in the region producing 19% of the world's wheat. In order to combat the potential threat the national research centers were geared up to track the real time movement of wheat diseases, generate disease incidence data and create an enabling environment to boost wheat research in the region through streamlined efforts and enhanced SAARC tool box deployed six years ago.
Recent data (2016-17) from the tool box has shown a significant increase in the data records captured in this region compared to previous years. This has been possible because of heightened awareness amongst the scientists and with the continuous capacity building through pre-season and in-season surveillance trainings organized by Sathguru in collaboration with National Wheat Research Institutes at various levels.
The model is helping partner institutes to be self-sufficient for generating, maintaining wheat disease surveillance data in national and global databases and exchanging real time information with stakeholders. The application have been widely deployed and competently being used by 95% of rust surveillance teams in the wheat fields of SAARC region.
The study will focus on how national research center's judicious decision of carrying out diligent surveillance during the season contributed to safeguarding wheat crops in their respective nations through increased vigilance on emergence of new races and targeted introduction of regionally resistant varieties. Further using this data scientist's can aim to strategize their wheat research for identification of resistant varieties and eventually resulting in increased productivity addressing food security of the region.

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Developing rust resistant bread wheat genotypes for warmer areas in India

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sanjay Kumar Singh ICAR- Indian Institute of Wheat & Barley Research, Karnal-132001, India
Vinod Tiwari, DP Singh, RP Gangwar, GP Singh

The changing climatic conditions are affecting wheat production in major agro-ecological zones in India, namely, north western plains(NWPZ), north eastern plains(NEPZ), central (CZ) and peninsular zone(PZ) where the reproductive phase has to endure higher temperatures. Also, the prevalence and virulence of rust pathotypes and other diseases are affected. To address such challenges, development of wheat for climate resilience was initiated following shuttle breeding approach for incorporating heat stress tolerance as well as resistance to wheat rusts. During 2010-16, a total of 583 elite lines were evaluated against prevalent pathotypes of stripe rust 78S84, 110S119, 110S84 and 46S119; leaf rust 12-2(1R5), 12-5(29R45), 77-2(109R31-1), 77-5(121R63-1), 77-9(121R60-1) and 104-2 (21R55) and stem rust 11(79G31), 40A(62G29), 42(19G35), 122(7G11) and 117-6(37G19) of which 108 promising entries were identified. These lines were evaluated for disease response in multilocational Initial Plant Pathological Screening Nursery (IPPSN) against prevalent races of all three rusts. Based on average coefficient of infection (15.0 ACI), 42 (39%), 104 (96%) and 90(83%) entries were found resistant to different races of stripe, leaf and stem rusts, respectively. Based on performance in multiplication yield trials, 29 entries were contributed in national coordinated evaluation system on Wheat & Barley which resulted in release of four wheat cultivars DBW71(Yr9+27+,Lr26+,Sr2+5+31+), DBW107(Yr9+,Lr26+3+,Sr31+), DBW110(Yr2+, Lr13+10+,Sr13+11+) and DBW93(Yr9+, Lr26+23+, Sr31+) for commercial cultivation in NWPZ, NEPZ, CZ and PZ, respectively. These cultivars are becoming popular among farmers due to their yield advantage, resistance to diseases, tolerance to high temperature and better quality traits. Also, DBW 129 was screened in multiple disease screening nursery (MDSN) and observed resistant to all rusts, leaf blight, powdery mildew, flag smut and shoot fly. The adoption of the newly developed cultivars for deployment of differential genes for resistance would lead to reduction in disease pressure and bring higher profitability to farmers in different agro-ecological zones in India.

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Allelism of resistance genes YrH52, YrG303 and Yr15 originating from different wild emmer sources

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Valentina Klymiuk Institute of Evolution and the Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, University of Haifa, Israel
Dina Raats, Lin Huang, Valeria Bocharova, Jorge Dubcovsky, Abraham Korol, Tzion Fahima

Wild emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccoides, (DIC)) is an important source of resistance to stripe rust due to presence of Puccinia striiformis in its natural habitats with high humidity and relatively low temperatures that are favorable for stripe rust development. Previously, we showed that DIC accessions from northern Israel were highly resistant to stripe rust. According to the rust responses of three DIC accessions (G25, H52, G303) and mapping of the resistance to relatively close, but different, genetic positions on chromosome 1BS, three different resistance genes were assumed to be present. However, the development of additional critical recombinants and new higher resolution genetic maps for these three genes in subsequent work led us to place YrH52 and YrG303 in the same genetic interval as Yr15, suggesting that the three putative genes are allelic or identical. The recent cloning of Yr15 allowed us to test this hypothesis using an EMS mutagenesis approach. We sequenced the Yr15 locus in five yrH52 and three yrG303 susceptible mutants and identified missense point mutations associated with the susceptible phenotype in each one. Thus, YrH52 and YrG303 may not be new genes. Further work is under way to determine if these genes are allelic or identical.

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