All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 111 - 120 of 415 records | 12 of 42 pages

Sources of Resistance to Septoria Tritici Blotch Identified in Ethiopian Durum Wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Carlo Fadda Bioversity International
Bogale Nigir, Cherinet Alem, Yosef G. Kidane, Mario Enrico Pè, Matteo Dell'Acqua

Septoria tritici blotch (STB) is a devastating fungal disease affecting durum and bread wheat cultivation worldwide. The search for resistance sources in untapped genetic resources may speed up breeding for STB resistance. Ethiopian durum wheat landraces represent a valuable source of allelic diversity for several traits, including disease resistance. In this study, we measure STB phenotypes under natural infection on two interconnected populations: i) a diversity panel comprising 318 Ethiopian durum wheat lines, mostly farmer varieties, and ii) a nested association mapping (NAM) population developed from a subset of the diversity panel. Phenology, yield and yield component traits were concurrently measured in the populations. We evaluated the distribution of STB resistance in Ethiopian genetic materials and the relationship existing between STB resistance and agronomic traits. STB resistance sources were found in landraces as well as in NAM lines. The genetic material was genotyped with more than 13 thousand genome-wide SNP markers to describe the linkage disequilibrium and genetic structure existing within the panels. The genotyping information was combined with phenotypes to identify marker-trait associations and loci involved in STB resistance. We identified several loci, each explaining up to 10% of the phenotypic variance for disease resistance. We developed KASP markers tagging the most interesting loci to allow the uptake of our results in a breeding perspective. Our results showed that the Ethiopian untapped allelic diversity bears a great value for studying the molecular basis of STB resistance and for breeding for resistance in local and international material.

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Innovative manufacturing of a cereal rust inoculation device

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Zak Pretorius University of the Free State
Gerrie Booysen, Willem Boshoff, Jozua Joubert

Urediniospores of rust fungi can be applied to cereal plants in several ways. Depending on the objective and available infrastructure, plants can be inoculated with a suspension of spores in either water, light mineral oil (e.g. Soltrol 130®) or engineered fluid (e.g. Novec 7100®). Alternatively, dry spores can be allowed to settle on plant surfaces by dusting or directly applied with a spatula or small brush. Several rust laboratories employ a system where a spore-oil suspension, contained in a gelatin capsule, is sprayed onto seedling leaves by means of a dedicated atomizer connected to an air pressure source. Although this approach is easy to use and highly efficient, the devices are not commercially available in South Africa. Locally, these inoculation appliances need to be manufactured by a conventional milling process that requires a specialized workshop and skilled personnel. This subtractive process is labour intensive and greatly prohibitive in terms of costs. Using a process called Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as "3D printing", the body of an inoculator was digitally designed and then laser sintered in nylon. Loose powder was removed from flow channels by compressed air. A copper tube fitted afterwards connected the nylon body with the spore suspension in the capsule. Replicated inoculation tests of wheat seedlings with urediniospore bulks or single pustule collections of Puccinia triticina and P. graminis f. sp. tritici resulted in consistent levels of rust severity and infection frequency. Cleaning of inoculators in acetone for 1 min followed by a 1 h heat treatment at 60°C produced no contaminant infection in follow-up tests. The design has been registered in South Africa, the USA and Europe.

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Monitoring wheat diseases in Nepal 2014-2016

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Suraj Baidya Plant Pathology Division, Nepal Agricultural Research Council
Baidya Nath Mahto, Durba Bahadur, Thapa Roshan, Basnet Nautan Raj, Gautam Sesh, Raman Upadhyaya

Disease surveillance is very important in establishing the status of disease response in crops. During the 2014 to 2016 wheat seasons, foliar blight (spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana and tan spot caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis) was recorded as severe across the entire whole plains region. Foliar blight was moderate in the mid hills, especially the Kathmandu valley. Leaf rust was severe (10MS - 100S) at several places in the mid hills. This could be due either to climatic conditions or varieties susceptible to the prevailing pathotypes. Yellow rust was also recorded up to 100S in the Kathmandu valley. Newly released varieties Gaura and Dhaulagiri showed yellow rust incidence of 20MS to 40S. Stem rust was sporadic and light and was observed very late in the season (tR - 10MR) in far western districts and the Kathmandu valley. Powdery mildew was moderate and localized. Loose smut was found at low levels throughout the mid hills. In 2014, Karnal bunt (caused by Tilletia indica) was also recorded in far western regions. Five different pathotypes of P. triticina (121R63-1, 21R55, 21R63 and 0R9) and one Pst pathotype (110S119) have prevailed during the last few years. Wheat genotypes were evaluated at Khumaltar and those reputed to have Yr27, Yr27+, Yr27+Yr18, Yr31+APR, Yr9, Yr10 and Yr15 were resistant. Similarly, genotypes containing Lr34+ had lower leaf rust severities than others.

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Study of the effect of planting date on the severity of yellow rust disease on bread wheat in northeastern Syria

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Omran Youssef University of Hohenheim, Germany
Afrem,Issa, Helim, Youssef, Nawzad, Suleiman, Abdul Rahman, Issa, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat is grown in Syria during the November-December. Wheat is exposed to many strains that negatively affect its productivity especially rust diseases, which was reported on wheat in Syria for many years and the most severe in 2010, Therefore, we studied the effect of planting dates on the severity and development of yellow rust disease. Where the field trials of the 2010-2011 season were carried out at the two locations in northeastern of Syria: Al-Qamishli Research Center and Yanbouh Research Station in Al-Malekia. By cultivating the susceptible bread wheat Cham 8, where six dates were planted starting from 02.10. 2010, a difference of 15 days. The results showed there was a difference in the severity of the yellow rust disease according to the dates of cultivation and thus the stages of growth in the plant and this was evident in the Yanbouh location where the onset of the onset of injury on 08.04.2011 in the all dates and developed the infection to 40S degrees and 30%. Also, on the 24. 04. 2011, the infection was recorded at the Qamishli location only on the third and fourth dates. The disease did not develop more than 10S and 10% due to climatic conditions due to rain and high temperature during the season. The results showed a positive correlation between the evolution of the disease and vegetative growth of plants, where the growth of plants was more active at the site of Yanbouh, especially in the second, third and fourth dates in the development of infection on plants in the rest of the dates because of weak and slow growth of plants.

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Mapping resistance in wheat landraces to the Ug99 race group of the stem rust pathogen

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Kerri Neugebauer USDA-ARS
Ebrahiem Babiker, Tyler Gordon, Sam Stoxen, Matthew Rouse, Yue Jin, Shiaoman Chao, John Bonman

Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a threat to wheat production worldwide. To manage this important disease, new sources of genetic resistance are needed and common wheat landraces are a potential source of such resistance. Landrace accessions from the USDA-ARS National Small Grains Collection were evaluated for seedling resistance to the Ug99 race group. To identify accessions most likely to carry novel resistance genes, a bulked segregant analysis (BSA) approach was used. Seven resistant accessions were crossed to a susceptible parent line and F3 families were tested against Pgt race TTKSK. The resistant plants were identified and grouped into two bulks per population. The bulks, along with the parents and F1 progeny, were genotyped with the 90K wheat iSelect SNP genotyping platform. Four of the populations appeared to segregate in a 1:1 phenotypic resistant/susceptible ratio, one in a 1:2 ratio, and two in 1:3 ratios. However, chi squared tests indicated the ratios were statistically the best fit for only two of the 1:1 segregating populations and one of the 1:3 segregating populations. Initial BSA results indicate the markers associated with reduced stem rust infection are located on wheat chromosomes 1DL and 2B. These mapping populations are being advanced for further evaluation to ascertain if novel resistance to the Ug99 stem rust race group is present.

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Genomic scan in durum wheat reveals regions controlling adaptation to the heat-prone conditions of the Senegal River

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Amadou Tidiane Sall ICARDA
Filippo,Bassi, Rodomiro, Ortiz, Ibrahima, Ndoye, AbdelKarim, Filali-Maltouf, Bouchra, Belkadi, Miloudi, Nachit, Michel, Baum, Hafssa, Kabbaj, Habibou, Gueye, Madiama, Cisse, , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat is a major food crop in West Africa, but its production is significantly affected by severe heat. Unfortunately, these types of high temperatures are also becoming frequent in other regions where wheat is commonly grown. In an attempt to improve durum wheat tolerance to heat, a collection of 287 elite breeding lines, including several from both ICARDA and CIMMYT, was assessed for response to heat stress in two irrigated sites along the Senegal River: Fanaye, Senegal and Kaedi, Mauritania during 2014-2015, and 2015-2016 winter seasons. The maximum recorded grain yield was 5t ha-1, which was achieved after just 90 days from sowing to harvesting. Phenological traits (heading, maturity and grain filling period) and yield components (1000-kernel weight, spike density and biomass) had also large phenotypic variation and a significant effect on grain yield performance. This panel was genotyped by 35K Axiom to generate 8,173 polymorphic SNPs. Genomic scans identified a total of 34 significant association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and traits across the four environments, including 15 related to phenological adaptation, 12 controlling grain yield components, and seven linked to grain yield per se. The identification of these genomic regions can now be used to design targeted crosses to pyramid heat tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTL), while the SNPs underlying these QTL can be deployed to accelerate selection process facilitated by DNA-aided breeding.

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Business mentoring contributes to the growth of small and wheat seed enterprises in Nepal

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Narayan Khanal CIMMYT International, South Asia, Regional Office, Kathmandu
Gurbinder Gill, Madan Bhatta, Andrew McDonald, Arun Joshi

The experience of seed system development works in Nepal shows that lack of business orientation is one of the key challenges for the growth of Nepalese seed enterprises (SEs). We implemented a business mentorship activity focusing on SEs in the project - Cereal System Initiative for South Asia. The business mentoring (BM) was implemented covering 10 SEs during 2014 to 2017 using discovery sensitization and facilitation mode. The key actions were, SWOT analysis, mentorship to develop strategic business plan, technical facilitation for seed quality improvement through maintenance breeding and on-farm farmer participatory trials as well as large plot demonstrations of recently released and pre-released wheat varieties. This resulted in 45% average increase in the volume of seed sold by individual SEs in three years. Five SEs started maintenance breeding in wheat and by third year, over 50% of the seed sold by the enterprises consisted of newly released varieties compared to 20% before mentoring. The improved performance of SEs prompted seed quality control authority of Nepal to issue a license to two of these private seed companies for maintenance breeding cum foundation seed production. As a consequence, foundation seed production of these entities increased by 60% in three years, and two of them have also started maintenance breeding in rice from 2017. The facilitation in developing business plan by SEs helped them to attract financial resources from different sources in upgrading seed processing, storage and laboratory facilities. Moreover, the National Wheat Research Program of Nepal has proposed the release of a new wheat variety BL 4341 through integration of on-farm trials and seed production data of these SEs. This new variety is resistant to major diseases, yields 7% higher than the popular cultivar NL 297 which was released 32 years ago and needed replacement due to susceptibility to wheat rusts

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Wheat disease surveillance and monitoring in Bangladesh

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Md Farhad Wheat Research Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Kishwar-E-,Mustarin, Md Mostofa Ali, Reza, Krishna Kanto, Roy, Md. Ashraful, Alam, Md. Rezaul, Kabir, MD Abdil, Hakim, Md Monwar, Hossain, Md Rabiul, Islam, Tim, Krupnik, Md Forhad, Amin, Md. Mosharraf, Hossain, Nure Alam, Siddque, Paritosh Kumar, Malaker, Maricellis, Acevedo, Noresh Chandra Deb, Barma

Disease surveillance and monitoring has been regularly organized by Wheat Research Centre (WRC), in major wheat growing areas of Bangladesh since 2010-11 to track the current status of common diseases, first outbreak of new disease(s), the pathogen hotspot and identify new virulent races. Besides the paper based traditional survey, scientists of WRC are now using different tools like Smartphone/Tablet with supporting applications. Several trainings were arranged under DGGW project on rust tool box in Bangladesh. Among all smartphone applications, RustSurvey is the easiest and handy application which integrates with the SAARC Surveillance Toolbox.
A disease surveillance program on wheat blast was organized in Mid February 2017 followed by hands on training in collaboration with CIMMYT and CU, USA. Out of 103 sites surveyed, 33 sites were found infected with wheat blast. Overall disease incidence was comparatively lower than the previous season with low disease severity (5-10%). Surveillance program on rust diseases was also conducted in early March 2016. Among 102 rust survey sites stem rust and yellow rust was not found, but leaf rust occurred with varying levels of severity depending on field locations, sowing times and cultivars grown. About 52% of the 102 fields investigated had leaf rust, and almost 73% of the infected fields showed low (<20%), 21% moderate (20-40%) and only 6% showed high (more than 40%) disease severity. Timely (15-30 November) planted crops largely escaped or had less disease compared to those planted late in the season. The predominant cultivar Prodip as well as BARI Gom 25 and 26 showed zero to high disease levels with MSS type reactions. BARI Gom 21, 28, 29 and 30 were free from leaf rust infection. Furthermore, Spot blotch was found in most of the region with low to high level field incidence depending on crop growth stage.

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Introgression of the coupled Sr2/Fhb1 for resistance to stem rust and Fusarium head blight into Uruguayan elite wheat cultivars

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Miguel Raffo Instituto Nacional de Investigaci?n Agropecuaria (INIA)
Clara,Pritsch, Gustavo, Azzimonti, Silvia, Pereyra, Mart?n, Quincke, Victoria, Bonnecarrere, Paula, Silva, Ariel, Castro, Bettina, Lado, Silvina, Bar?ibar, Richard, Garc?a, Silvia, Germ?n, , , , , , , ,

Stem rust (SR) and Fusarium head blight (FHB) threaten the sustainability of wheat production worldwide. Sr2 is a widely used gene conferring partial, but durable, resistance to SR. Fhb1 confers a significant level of FHB resistance, but is poorly represented in the INIA-Uruguay wheat-breeding program. Sr2 and Fhb1 are linked in repulsion (~3 cM apart) on chromosome 3B. However, lines with Sr2 and Fhb1 in coupling were recently developed at the University of Minnesota, USA (kindly provided by J. Anderson). In order to incorporate Sr2/Fhb1 into Uruguayan elite wheat cultivars the donor line was crossed and backcrossed with four cultivars lacking both genes and expressing an intermediate to low level of resistance to SR and FHB: G?nesis 2375, G?nesis 6.87, INIA Madrugador, and INIA Don Alberto. Genotypes carrying Sr2/Fhb1 were selected using molecular marker UMN10; 250 BC2F1 were obtained for each recurrent parent. BC3F1 plants positive for UMN10 will be selected. The effect of Sr2/Fhb1 on response to SR and FHB in the different genetic backgrounds will be quantified by comparing disease severities of BC3F2 homozygotes with and without the UMN10 marker. Hopefully the introduction of Sr2/Fhb1 will contribute in reducing the risk of SR and FHB in wheat crops in Uruguay.

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Achieving triple rust resistance in wheat through combination of phenomic and genomic tools

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Urmil Bansal University of Sydney Plant Breeding Institute
Naeela Qureshi, Vallence Nsaiyera, Pakeer Kandiah, Mesfin Gesesse, Mandeep Randhawa, Mumta Chhetri, Bosco Chenayek, James Kolmer, Miroslav Valarik, Zaroslav Dolezel, Beat Keller, Matthew Hayden, Justin Faris, Harbans Bariana, Vanessa Wells

Dr. Norman Borlaug stated that rust never sleeps and this enables rust pathogens to produce new strains capable of putting rust resistance genes to rest. These pathogens continue to pose threats to global wheat production. Wheat breeders have made significant progress to control rust outbreaks using conventional selection technologies; however, some critical shifts in pathogen populations have let them down. Rapid evolution in molecular marker technologies in the last 15 years and refinement of phenomic facilities have expedited the process of discovery and characterisation of rust resistance genes to underpin the development and validation of markers closely linked with genetically diverse sources of resistance. A high proportion of the formally named rust resistance genes were characterized in the 21st century and markers closely linked with these genes have been developed and validated. The marker tagged sources of resistance to three rust diseases have equipped the wheat breeding community with tools to deploy combinations of all stage and adult plant resistance genes in future wheat cultivars. The question that whether we have enough resistance genes discovered to compete against the ever-awake rust pathogens. In our opinion, we cannot be complacent and discovery needs to continue to ensure food security. This presentation will discuss the role of advances in phenomic and genomic technologies to achieve durable rust control in wheat.

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