All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 101 - 110 of 415 records | 11 of 42 pages

SSR analysis of 2015 Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici population in Kenya

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Edgar Okello University of Eldoret
Julius Ochuodho, Ruth Wanyera, Sridhar Bhavani, Les Szabo

Stem rust Ug99 and related race group are one of the major constraints of wheat production in Kenya. The challenge has been largely due to rapid evolution of races within lineage defeating resistance genes resulting in boom and burst cycles. Understanding of the pathogen population structure in major wheat growing regions in Kenya gives comprehensive information of the predominant races as well as capturing new races which may have potential of causing epidemics. Such information can have significant impact on effective gene stewardship in breeding resistant varieties. Using 11 Pgt Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers we analyzed 104 single uredinial-pustule samples. Allele frequency distribution ranged from 2 to 6 per locus with an average of 3.27 per locus. Observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.297-1.000 (mean HO=?0.809) was significantly different (P< 0.001) than the expected heterozygosity (0.264 to 0.507; mean HE=?0.407) indicating that the population is asexual. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that the majority of the variation occurred within the samples (98%) rather than between regions (2%). Analysis of 104 samples identified 21 multiple locus genotypes (MLGs). MLG.19 was observed across the three region analyzed that is Central Rift, North Rift and Mount Kenya while MLG.18 was predominant in Mount Kenya. Based on SSR genotypes of reference isolates, Pgt clade IV (race TKTTF) was associated with MLG.16 in Central Rift Kenya while clade I (race TTKSK) had a unique MLG.10. These results indicated two main groups corresponding to Clade I (Ug99 race group) and Clade IV (race TKTTF race group). This minimum spanning network analysis pattern points to the Pgt population being asexual due to mutation. These preliminary results suggest that Pgt population in Kenya is asexual in nature. Further analysis is being conducted to ascertain geographical structure as well as compare the results with the 2011 data.

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Business mentoring contributes to the growth of small and wheat seed enterprises in Nepal

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Narayan Khanal CIMMYT International, South Asia, Regional Office, Kathmandu
Gurbinder Gill, Madan Bhatta, Andrew McDonald, Arun Joshi

The experience of seed system development works in Nepal shows that lack of business orientation is one of the key challenges for the growth of Nepalese seed enterprises (SEs). We implemented a business mentorship activity focusing on SEs in the project - Cereal System Initiative for South Asia. The business mentoring (BM) was implemented covering 10 SEs during 2014 to 2017 using discovery sensitization and facilitation mode. The key actions were, SWOT analysis, mentorship to develop strategic business plan, technical facilitation for seed quality improvement through maintenance breeding and on-farm farmer participatory trials as well as large plot demonstrations of recently released and pre-released wheat varieties. This resulted in 45% average increase in the volume of seed sold by individual SEs in three years. Five SEs started maintenance breeding in wheat and by third year, over 50% of the seed sold by the enterprises consisted of newly released varieties compared to 20% before mentoring. The improved performance of SEs prompted seed quality control authority of Nepal to issue a license to two of these private seed companies for maintenance breeding cum foundation seed production. As a consequence, foundation seed production of these entities increased by 60% in three years, and two of them have also started maintenance breeding in rice from 2017. The facilitation in developing business plan by SEs helped them to attract financial resources from different sources in upgrading seed processing, storage and laboratory facilities. Moreover, the National Wheat Research Program of Nepal has proposed the release of a new wheat variety BL 4341 through integration of on-farm trials and seed production data of these SEs. This new variety is resistant to major diseases, yields 7% higher than the popular cultivar NL 297 which was released 32 years ago and needed replacement due to susceptibility to wheat rusts

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A new warrior race of Puccinia striiformis f.sp tritici in Syria

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mohammad Kassem Aleppo University, Aleppo , Syria
Bassam,Souliman, Naem, Al-Housien, Mohammad Shafick, Hakiem, Miloudi.M, Nachit, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat yellow rust, caused by Puccinia triticina f. sp. tritici, is the major problem in wheat production in most parts of West Asia. Monitoring of the pathogen virulence factors and their changes provides basic information for the development of an early warning system. Wheat yellow rust has become increasingly important in the Syrian central and coastal areas during the last three years, The objective of this study was to identify races of the pathogen. Yellow rust samples collected at sites in the central and the coastal plains, were analyzed on differential host genotypes with known seedling resistance genes. According to the results of race determination, races 230E150, 166E150, 230E142 and 462E128 were identified. The race 462E128 designated the Warrior race, was identified at several sites across the Syrian central plains at the end of the 2017 growing season (early and Mid-May) when yellow rust exploded suddenly on a number of varieties, despite their previous high resistance ratings. The infections rapidly reached significant levels, in spite of the high temperature (up to 33?C) and the absence of rainfall or irrigation. This new virulent race (462E128) has been able to attack wheat lines with several major resistance gene(s) including: Spaldings Prolific (SP), Yr 3+4, Triticum spelta (Yr5), which remained effective until 2016 in Syria, Virulence to lthe resistance genes Yr1, Yr2, Yr2+, Yr3V, Yr3ND, Yr4+, Yr6, Yr6+, Yr7, Yr7+, Yr9, Yr9+, Yr11, Yr12, Yr18, Yr24, Yr26 Spaldings Prolific (YrSP), Anza (YrA+) Spaldings Prolific (SP), Yr 3+4, Triticum spelta (Yr5) and Selkirk (YrSK) was also found. Virulence to Carstens V (CV), Yr 15/6* Avocet S and Yr 5/6* Avocet S; was not found. According to our findings, the Warrior race has increased in frequency within the mix of yellow rust races in these areas in Syria . It is expected that the Warrior yellow rust race will cause damage on resistant wheat cultivars in 2018.

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Wheat disease surveillance and monitoring in Bangladesh

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Md Farhad Wheat Research Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Kishwar-E-,Mustarin, Md Mostofa Ali, Reza, Krishna Kanto, Roy, Md. Ashraful, Alam, Md. Rezaul, Kabir, MD Abdil, Hakim, Md Monwar, Hossain, Md Rabiul, Islam, Tim, Krupnik, Md Forhad, Amin, Md. Mosharraf, Hossain, Nure Alam, Siddque, Paritosh Kumar, Malaker, Maricellis, Acevedo, Noresh Chandra Deb, Barma

Disease surveillance and monitoring has been regularly organized by Wheat Research Centre (WRC), in major wheat growing areas of Bangladesh since 2010-11 to track the current status of common diseases, first outbreak of new disease(s), the pathogen hotspot and identify new virulent races. Besides the paper based traditional survey, scientists of WRC are now using different tools like Smartphone/Tablet with supporting applications. Several trainings were arranged under DGGW project on rust tool box in Bangladesh. Among all smartphone applications, RustSurvey is the easiest and handy application which integrates with the SAARC Surveillance Toolbox.
A disease surveillance program on wheat blast was organized in Mid February 2017 followed by hands on training in collaboration with CIMMYT and CU, USA. Out of 103 sites surveyed, 33 sites were found infected with wheat blast. Overall disease incidence was comparatively lower than the previous season with low disease severity (5-10%). Surveillance program on rust diseases was also conducted in early March 2016. Among 102 rust survey sites stem rust and yellow rust was not found, but leaf rust occurred with varying levels of severity depending on field locations, sowing times and cultivars grown. About 52% of the 102 fields investigated had leaf rust, and almost 73% of the infected fields showed low (<20%), 21% moderate (20-40%) and only 6% showed high (more than 40%) disease severity. Timely (15-30 November) planted crops largely escaped or had less disease compared to those planted late in the season. The predominant cultivar Prodip as well as BARI Gom 25 and 26 showed zero to high disease levels with MSS type reactions. BARI Gom 21, 28, 29 and 30 were free from leaf rust infection. Furthermore, Spot blotch was found in most of the region with low to high level field incidence depending on crop growth stage.

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Virulence evolution of Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici on wheat in Kenya between 1970 to 1992 and 2009 to 2014

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mercy Wamalwa Egerton University Njoro, Kenya
Ruth Wanyera, James Owuoche, Julian Rodriguez, Annemarie Justesen, Lesley Lesley, Sridhar Bhavani, Cristobal Uauy, Mogens Hovmøller

Emergence of new virulent races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) to stripe (yellow) rust resistance genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has historically resulted in severe yield losses worldwide. We conducted a study to characterize the virulence profiles of Pst races prevalent in Kenya from historic (1970-1992) and recent collections (2009-2014). Pst isolates collected during surveys in Kenya were characterized at the Global Rust Research Centre (GRRC), Denmark. Yellow rust differential sets (wheat lines with known Yr resistance genes), and strain-specific sequence-characterized-amplified-region (SCAR) markers were used to group the Pst isolates as Pst1 or Pst2. Virulence to Yr1, Yr2, Yr3,Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr17, Yr25, Yr27, and the seedling resistance in AvocetS were detected. A total of 12 virulence profiles /races were detected in isolates obtained during 1970 to 1992, while six races were detected from samples collected between 2009 to 2014. In both periods, races with virulence profiles Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr25, Yr27, Avs and Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr17, Yr25, AvS were common. The SCAR results revealed that both Pst1 and Pst2 strains were present in the Pst isolates tested, Pst1 even in isolates from the 1970s. Additional isolates were also identified with neither Pst1 nor Pst2 profiles. From our findings, race analysis is key to understand the race diversity and pre-breeding efforts for effective resistance gene deployment.

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Identification and Analysis of RNA Editing Sites in the Chloroplast Transcripts of Aegilops tauschii L.

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mengxing Wang State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology in Arid Areas, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China
Hui,Liu, Guangwei, Xing, Xiaojun, Nie, Song, Weining, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

RNA editing is an important way to convert cytidine (C) to uridine (U) at specific sites within RNA molecules at a post-transcriptional level in the chloroplasts of higher plants. Although it has been systematically studied in many plants, little is known about RNA editing in the wheat D genome donor Aegilops tauschii L. Here, we investigated the chloroplast RNA editing of Ae. tauschii and compared it with other wheat relatives to trace the evolution of wheat. Through bioinformatics prediction, a total of 34 C-to-U editing sites were identified, 17 of which were validated using RT-PCR product sequencing. Furthermore, 60 sites were found by the RNA-Seq read mapping approach, 24 of which agreed with the prediction and six were validated experimentally. The editing sites were biased toward tCn or nCa trinucleotides and 50-pyrimidines, which were consistent with the flanking bases of editing sites of other seed plants. Furthermore, the editing events could result in the alteration of the secondary structures and topologies of the corresponding proteins, suggesting that RNA editing might impact the function of target genes. Finally, comparative analysis found some evolutionarily conserved editing sites in wheat and two species-specific sites were also obtained. This study is the first to report on RNA editing in Aegilops tauschii L, which not only sheds light on the evolution of wheat from the point of view of RNA editing, but also lays a foundation for further studies to identify the mechanisms of C-to-U alterations.

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How to adapt durum wheat when the environment tries everything to kill it

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Filippo Maria Bassi ICARDA, Rabat
Khaoula El Hassouni, Priyanka Gupta, Hafssa Kabbaj, Meryam Zaim, Amadou Tidiane Sall, Bouchra Belkadi, Ayed Al-Abdallat, Ahmed Amri, Rodomiro Ortiz, Michael Baum

Durum wheat is the tenth most important crop in the world, but its cultivation is mostly limited to harsh, arid, and heat prone marginal lands. Breeding for tolerance to these conditions is often considered the most strategic approach to ensure adaptation, especially when paired with best agronomical practices. The word 'adaptation' summarizes all the research efforts conducted to identify the many traits controlling the mechanisms for withstanding or escaping the traceries of the environment. It can be summarized as "GGE vs E". The durum wheat breeding program of ICARDA deploys targeted phenotyping methods in combination with genomic scans to dissect these 'adaptive' traits into simple loci. These loci can then be pyramided via a combination of international field testing, markers assisted selection, genetically-driven crossing schemes, and genomic selection to derive climate-ready cultivars. Here, several examples of this approach are presented and their implications for 'adaptation' are discussed.

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Stem rust resistance in durum wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Pablo Olivera University of Minnesota
Ayele Badebo, Worku Bulbula, Matthew Rouse, Yue Jin

Our research objective is to identify new resistance genes in durum wheat that are effective against TTKSK and other significant stem rust pathogen races that could be utilized in durum breeding. We characterized 8,000 accessions for stem rust response in the field (Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, and St. Paul, MN). Accessions with resistant to moderately resistant responses in multiple field evaluations were evaluated at the seedling stage for resistance to races TTKSK, TRTTF, TTTTF, JRCQC, TKTTF, and six representative U.S. races. We identified 438 durum accessions resistant to moderately resistant in all field evaluations. Among the field-resistant accessions, 273 were resistant to all races used in seedling evaluations. Accessions susceptible at the seedling stage are being evaluated for the presence of adult plant resistance genes. The highest frequencies of resistant lines include landraces from East and North Africa (Ethiopia and Egypt) and advanced breeding lines and cultivars from North America (Mexico and USA). DNA markers will be performed to identify the presence of durum stem rust resistance genes, including Sr13, Sr8155B1, Sr11, and Sr8a. Nineteen resistant accessions were selected to investigate the genetics of TTKSK and TRTTF resistance. Results from evaluating F2 and F2:3 generations from biparental crosses revealed that resistance to race TTKSK was conferred mostly by one or two genes with dominant and recessive actions. Additional resistance genes were identified when populations were evaluated against race TRTTF. A bulk segregant analysis approach is being used to map the resistance in selected lines using the 90K SNP platform.

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Development of bread wheat cultivars for resistance to stem rust for cultivation in north zone of Iran

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Manoochehr Khodarahmi Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
Kamal Shahbazi, Jabbar Alt Jafarby, Mohammad Sadegh Khavarinejad, Farzad Afshari, Farshad Bakhtiar, Habibollah Soghi

In this project to obtain resistant wheat breeding lines/cultivars to stem rust disease, new cultivars and lines of the north breeding program were evaluated in greenhouse with races collected in 2014 from northern regions of Iran, Moghan and Gorgan. Artificial inoculation in greenhouse indicated none of the races had virulence on Sr11, Sr13, Sr24, Sr25, Sr26, Sr27, Sr29, Sr31, Sr32, Sr33, Sr37, Sr39, Sr40, and SrTmp. In order to evaluate seedling resistance, 143 wheat cultivars and new lines under greenhouse conditions were inoculated with four isolates of stem rust in four separate experiments in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Evaluation of the northern germplasm under greenhouse conditions showed that some of the genotypes were resistant against all four isolates. The resistance of some of these new lines was also confirmed in Kenya. Regarding other desirable agronomic characteristics, some of these lines will be introduced as new cultivars in the northern region of Iran.

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Mining of hulled wheat species for yield gain in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vikas Venu Kumaran ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Regional Station, Wellington, The Nilgiris, Tamilnadu, India
SIVASAMY,MURUGASAMY, JAYAPRAKASH, PARAMASIVAM, RAJESH KUMAR, MEENA, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccum L.), tetraploid species (AABB) and spelt wheat (Triticum spelta L.), hexaploid species (AABBDD) are old world hulled wheat species cultivated centuries ago in different parts of the world. These species were later replaced by higher yielding bread and durum wheat in the last centuries. Grain yield is influenced by grain number per unit area and grain size which correlates positively with grain weight. Increasing the grain number was extensively and intensively explored in the past 100 years of wheat breeding which has nearly reached to saturation and leaves little room for further yield increase due to grain number?grain size trade off. Grain size/grain weight is believed to be major driving force for further improvement of wheat yield. Both the species have been characterised with larger grain size and higher grain weight; therefore an ideal source to improve the grain size/grain weight while maintaining the grain number per spike in the cultivated bread wheat. A total of 25 accessions each of emmer and spelt wheat with good grain size and weight were crossed with 5 elite bread wheat lines. In the F2 generation, recombinant lines with good grain size, higher grain weight and grains number were further backcrossed with bread wheat. Stable lines with free threshing were obtained at BC4F4 generations and were analysed for quality. Thousand grain weight (TGW) and harvest index (HI) ranged from 46-55g and 0.47-0.58 in stable lines respectively. Stable lines yielded 16-21% than the high yielding check while number of grains per spike was maintained as that of check. Stable lines involving spelt crosses have higher grain size, TGW and HI than emmer wheat crosses. Stable lines could be released directly as cultivar or else used as one of the parents in the wheat improvement programme.

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