All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 1 - 10 of 219 records | 1 of 22 pages

Resistance to tan spot in Tunisian wheat landraces

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mejda Cherif National Agronomic Institute of Tunisia
Sana Kamel, Elhem, Elfahem, Wissal Feriani, Hanen Sbei

In order to identify sources of resistance to tan spot caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, 359 local wheat accessions were evaluated for reaction to the Oued-Mliz isolate in controlled conditions and in the field. Two and three assessments were carried out at the seedling and adult stages, respectively. There was a highly significant accession effect and 4.2% of accessions were highly resistant in both controlled conditions and the field. Assessments at the seedling stage were positively correlated with each other, and assessments in the adult stage were also positively correlated. However, assessments at the seedling stage were negatively correlated with those at the adult stage. One hundred and fifty five accessions with known origins (from 15 localities belonging to four districts) were projected on a graph defined by the two axes: reactions at the seedling stage and reactions at the adult stage. After placing the average reactions at the seedling and adult stages on the graph, four groups of accessions were obtained: accessions that were resistant to both stages, accessions that were resistant at the adult stage only, accessions that were resistant at the seedling stage only, and accessions that were susceptible at both stages. All four groups were found in each district. However, considering localities, reactions of accessions were highly variable. For example, accessions originating from Menzel Hbib were genetically variable and were represented in each of the four groups, whereas accessions from Sidi El Hani were all resistant at both stages. Further work is needed to study the genetic variability within and between localities and to better understand the resistant accessions.

Tags:

Genes Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 interact to confer enhanced adult plant resistance to the three rust diseases of common wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mandeep Singh Randhawa International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico D.F., Mexico
Ravi P. Singh, Caixia Lan, Bhoja R. Basnet, Sridhar Bhavani, Julio Huerta-Espino, Kerrie L. Forrest, Matthew J. Hayden

Common wheat Arula displays an acceptable level of adult plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust (YR), leaf rust (LR) and stem rust (SR) in Mexico, and to SR (Ug99 races) in Kenya. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population developed from the cross of Arula with susceptible parent Apav was phenotyped under artificially created epidemics of the three rusts in 2014, 2015 and 2016 in Mexico and for SR during the off and main seasons of 2015 in Kenya. The RIL population and parents were genotyped using an iSelect 90K SNP array and 3 gene-linked markers (Sr2/Yr30-gwm533; Lr34/Yr18/Sr57-csLV34; Lr68-csGS), and a genetic map of 2,634 markers was constructed to locate the resistance loci. Two consistent QTL contributed by Arula were detected on chromosomes 3BS and 7DS, which corresponded to the previously known APR genes Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, respectively. Sr2/Yr30 explained 1.1-14.7% and 41.0-61.5% of the phenotypic variation for YR and SR, respectively; whereas Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 accounted for 22.5-78.0%, 40.0-84.3% and 13.8-24.8% of the phenotypic variation for YR, LR and SR, respectively. Arula was also found to carry the positive allele for marker csGS closely linked to gene Lr68 on chromosome 7BL, although this gene was not detected using composite interval mapping. Our results show that RILs possessing both Sr2/Yr30 and Lr34/Yr18/Sr57 had significantly enhanced APR to all three rusts in field trials conducted in Mexico and Kenya. Strategic utilization of these two pleiotropic, multi-pathogen resistance genes with other minor genes is recommended to develop durable rust resistant wheat cultivars.

Tags:

The need for seed: Support for formal and informal suppliers of certified wheat seed in Ethiopia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Bekele Abeyo CIMMYT
Ayele Badebo, Abebe Atilaw, Habtemariam Zegeye, Zerihun Tadesse, Wasihun Legesse, Terefe Fitta, Dawit Asnake

In Ethiopia, quality seed of improved varieties is the least expensive and most critical input for the sustainable production of wheat, a strategic food security crop grown by some 4.7 million households on 1.7 million hectares. Because wheat is self-pollinated, farmers can save and replant seed from their harvests for several years, without the variety losing its genetic identity. At the same time, recommended seed rates for wheat (150 to 200 kilograms per hectare) are significantly higher than those for tef (15 kg/ha) or maize (25 kg/ha), so some 255,000 tons of seed is required to sow Ethiopia's entire wheat area each year. Most of this still comes from informal seed systems; only four seed enterprises (ESE, ASE, OSE and SNNPSE) currently produce certified seed of various crops and they lack the capacity to supply enough high quality seed for the nation's approximately 20 million households. In collaboration with the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) and through the USAID-funded project "Seed multiplication and delivery of high-yielding rust resistant bread and durum wheat varieties to Ethiopian farmers," the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) is working to increase wheat farmers access to affordable, certified seed of improved varieties that are high-yielding and also feature durable resistance to the rust diseases. Approaches pursued include the fast-track evaluation and release of improved varieties, the pre-release or accelerated seed multiplication of released wheat varieties through formal and informal seed systems, and demonstrations and scaling up of improved wheat varieties. This paper describes best practices to address seed shortages faced by wheat farmers in 53 woredas.

Tags:

Reaction of Bhutanese wheat cultivars and differential lines to rust diseases at mid and low altitudes in Bhutan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sangay Chophel National Plant Protection Center
Namgay Om, Thinlay, Ugyen Yangchen

Wheat rusts are one of the important diseases that limit the production and downgrade wheat quality. Three rust diseases of wheat are stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks., stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks., and leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks. This study was conducted to determine the reaction of wheat varieties to wheat rusts at different altitudes. Field experiments were conducted from December 2016 to March 2017 at Mendagang (27.5886°N, 89.8711°E, 1332 masl), Punakha Dzongkhag (district) for mid altitude and at Agriculture Research and Development Center (ARDC), Samtenling (26.9058°N, 90.4308°E, 378 masl), Sarpang Dzongkhag, Bhutan for low altitude. The experiment followed a RCBD with 15 treatments comprising of three Bhutanese released varieties, eight SAARC varieties, and four ICARDA varieties. Each treatment was replicated three times. Assessment of disease incidence and severity were performed three times starting from tillering to ripening stage, approximately at 60, 90 and 120 days after sowing (DAS). Disease severity was determined following the modified Cobb’s disease rating scale. Of the 15 varieties, only 11 germinated in both the sites. Among the three wheat rust diseases, only leaf rust was observed in both sites. Leaf rust incidences ranged from 2.5 to 10% and 2.5 to 16% at mid and low altitudes respectively. Disease severity of 5 to 20%, corresponding to field response of immune (5O) to moderately resistant (20MR), was observed at mid altitude, while 5 to 100%, with immune (5O) to susceptible (100S), was observed at low altitude. There was a significant difference in disease incidence by site (p=.038) but not in disease severity (p=.129). The variety, ICARDA 1, with 100% severity was highly susceptible (100S) to leaf rust at low altitude while Bajosokha Kaa remained immune (5O) in both the sites. The results indicate that leaf rust can occur in both low and mid altitudes; however selection of suitable varieties requires more extensive studies.

Tags:

SAARC Tool Box: an approach to manage wheat rusts disease in Nepal

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Baidya Nath Mahto Nepal Agricultural Research Council (NARC)
Suraj Baidya, Dhruba Bahadur Thapa, Roshan Basnet, Sunita Adhikari, Prem Bahadur Magar, Ajaya Karkee, Nabin Dangal, Basistha Acharya, Ram Bahadur Khadka, Junga Bahadur Prasad, Purusottam Jha, Laxman Aryal, Prakash Pantha

Rusts are one of major threats to reduce wheat production and productivity in Nepal. Rust fungi are obligate parasite survival during off-season either on voluntary wheat plants or other grass or timber plant species is not yet confirmed in Nepal. High-inputs, suitable hosts and existence of warm humid and cool high lands in different parts of country promote carryover of inoculums of rust fungi. Nepal could be potential sources of yellow rust and leaf rust epidemic for itself and for Indian sub-continent. Surveillance is one of important steps to know status of wheat diseases especially rusts occurrence in country. The SAARC rust tool box is systematic and regular monitoring activity of wheat and barley diseases conducted at various locations in Nepal. Altogether, 183 and 180 locations were surveyed in different parts of Nepal were put in global rust tool box server and validated in fiscal years 2014/15 and 2015/16. Wheat rusts disease scenario has been observed differently, it could be due to climate change and different virulent spectrum of races/pathotypes of rusts fungi and deployment of different wheat varieties. Yellow rust was widely occurred throughout mid hills in Nepal. Higher severity of yellow rust was observed in Kathmandu valley (80S -100S). Leaf rust was moderate to high (10MS-100S) in plain and hills. There was higher score of leaf rust observed in plain as well as in mid hills on susceptible wheat cultivar. Regular monitoring and surveillance at different locations in Nepal has been found helpful in digging out actual problems of wheat crop. Monitoring races of all three rusts occurring in Nepal is necessary for successful planning to manage rusts by deploying effective genes. Rust tool box is important to keep vigilance of new emerging rust races in country. This in turn could increase production and productivity of wheat in Nepal.

Tags:

Characterisation of putative pleiotropic wheat leaf rust resistance gene Lr13

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Timothy Hewitt CSIRO
Jianping Zhang, Peng Zhang, Robert Park, Narayana Upadhyaya, Robert McIntosh, Sambasivam Periyannan, Brande Wulff, Burkhard Steuernagel, Evans Lagudah

Evolution of rust pathogens continues to pose challenges to global wheat production. Major resistance (R) genes, which encode proteins of the NBS-LRR (Nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat) family, have been a valuable resource for breeders to minimise yield losses from infection. Many wheat varieties harbor numerous R genes that could be identified and cloned in order to engineer more sustainable disease control. The advent of targeted gene enrichment and next-generation sequencing (NGS) has allowed rapid cloning of specific R genes, thus enhancing efforts to pyramid these genes and investigate their underlying resistance mechanisms. Several R genes present different phenotypes in certain genetic backgrounds, and cloning them would be an important step towards uncovering their interactions. Hybrid necrosis is one such phenotype observed in crosses of wheat genotypes involving the R gene Lr13 and complementary genes, Ne1 and Ne2, occurring in different allelic forms. It was recently concluded that Lr13 and an allele of Ne2 are actually the same gene based on genetic and mutational studies. The capability of Lr13 to confer both leaf rust resistance and hybrid necrosis cannot be answered without first cloning it. The lack of tightly linked markers coupled with the proximal 2BS chromosomal location of Lr13 does not make it easily amenable to map-based cloning. The NGS-based pipeline MutRenSeq (mutagenesis and R-gene enrichment sequencing) was used on EMS (Ethyl methanesulfonate) induced, susceptible Lr13 mutants along with support from comparative genomics to ascertain candidate gene sequences for Lr13, which are at advanced stages of screening and confirmation. Definite proof that a single gene is involved will only come with transformation studies when the cloned Lr13 candidate transformed into a susceptible line confers both a resistance phenotype in the transgenic line and a necrotic phenotype in the offspring of crosses between the transgenic line and a line possessing Ne1.

Tags:

Migration of Puccinia triticina hit renowned across countries and continents

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Younas Sohail Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, Government College Murree, Pakistan
Barkat Ali, Muhammad Fayyaz, Atiq ur Reman Rattu, Abdul Samad Mumtaz, Muhammad Imtiaz

The new arrival of wheat rust pathotypes through migration during wheat cropping season requires regular monitoring to secure wheat production. In the present study, we collected leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.) infected wheat leaves from three major wheat growing provinces of Pakistan in the year 2014 to assess the haplotype diversity of P. triticina (Pt) isolates. The rDNA ITS sequence data of collected isolates was used in NCBI BLAST analysis. The blast hits showed best matches with Pt accessions EU014050 (Iran), JN120331 (Iran), JX533577 (Iran), AY956549 (Iran), DQ417412 (Czech Republic), DQ417418 (Israel), DQ417413 (Slovakia) and AF511083 (Louisiana). However, in cluster analysis, the Pakistani isolates showed strong bootstrap support with only Iranian and Indian (races 77-5 & 104-4) accessions that indicated eastward migratory mode of Pt pathotypes in Pakistan through westerly wind patterns. The predominant genotype DQ417412 (similar in alignment with AY956549 from Iran) overcome the resistance of top Pakistan mega varieties Seher06, Inqilab91, Kiran95, SKD1, TJ83 and NIFA-Batoor. Hence, the ITS based information remains a rapid molecular tool for pathogen surveillance across countries and continents.

Tags:

Yield loss due to stem rust in wheat varieties with different types of resistance

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Tegwe Soko University of the Free State and Seed-Co
Vicky Coetzee, Cornelia M. Bender, Renée Prins, Zacharias A. Pretorius

Notwithstanding the re-emergence and importance of wheat stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), the degree of protection provided by different types of resistance has not been carefully investigated in contemporary studies. Seven wheat entries were exposed to stem rust infection and fungicide response in a split-plot field experiment over two seasons. Severe epidemics of Pgt race PTKST, generated by frequent inoculation of spreader rows within and around the trial, developed in both years. By comparing grain yield in rusted and fungicide sprayed plots, varieties SC Nduna (Sr31) and SC Stallion (Sr2+Sr31) sustained mean yield losses of 28.8% and 20.7%, respectively. From entries with adult plant resistance (APR), Kingbird recorded a loss of 10.1% as compared to W1406 (19.5%) and W6979 (15.4%). Grain yield of SC Sky which exhibits all stage resistance (ASR) was reduced by 6.4% over the two seasons. The highest yield loss (47.9%) was measured for Line 37, the susceptible control. A significant linear relationship occurred between percentage yield loss and AUDPC in both seasons (R2=0.99 and 0.83). This study showed that not all sources of APR to stem rust provided the same level of protection under severe disease pressure. In the absence of virulence for SC Sky, ASR conferred the most protection.

Tags:

Resistance to aphids in synthetic hexaploid wheat derived lines

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Leonardo A. Crespo-Herrera CIMMYT
Ravi P Singh, Julio Huerta-Espino

Aphids are major pests of wheat, able to cause up to 40% yield reduction solely due to direct feeding and up to 60% when feeding is combined with the transmission of viral diseases. Wheat resistance to aphids has proven to be effective in protecting yields and also in reducing the transmission rate of viral diseases. Moreover, aphid resistance is fundamental to reduce the negative impacts that the indiscriminate use of insecticides have on the environment and human health. In this study we report the results derived from the evaluation of 326 synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) derived lines against the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum [Rondai]). Primary SHWs were crossed with CIMMYT elite lines and further selected in the breeding pipeline. Therefore, such lines have acceptable agronomic characteristics for its further use in breeding programs. The 326 SHW derived lines were evaluated at seedling stage, in five augmented incomplete blocks, arranged in split-plots, with two treatments (infested vs. non-infested) and with resistant and susceptible checks replicated 16 times. The measured variables were chlorophyll content with a SPAD meter and a visual damage score in a scale 0-100 was also taken. Measurements were recorded when the susceptible check was dead due to aphid feeding. The evaluations were repeated two times for confirmation. Our results indicate the presence of genetic variation for S. graminum resistance. We identified about 4 % of the lines to carry high levels of resistance against this aphid. These lines are currently used in CIMMYT's bread wheat breeding program to incorporate the resistance in elite germplasm.

Tags:

Impact of extension activities on the adoption of new wheat varieties

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Joel Ransom North Dakota State University
Andrew Friskop

The rapid adoption of new varieties of wheat with disease resistance is critical to mitigating losses due to new diseases or disease races, even when only part of an integrated disease management program may include fungicides. There are numerous sources of information that can be used by farmers in North Dakota when selecting varieties with specific disease resistance as well as other traits. Formal surveys were conducted to determine the role of extension activities on the adoption of Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) control practices especially on the use of new varieties with FHB resistance. This disease became a regular and devastating problem of small grains in eastern North Dakotas in the 1990s. In a survey specific to North Dakota conducted in 2010, most respondents indicated that information from the extension service was their main source of information for FHB control with varietal selection their primary means of control. Extension publications, accessed through the internet or as hard copy obtained from an extension office or at an extension meeting were the most important sources; fewer respondents obtain their information from extension meetings and field days. A survey conducted in 2014 found that private sources (consultants and input suppliers) are becoming more important sources of information for FHB control and varietal selection, perhaps because the disease has become better understood and most new varieties have some level of FHB resistance. In durum wheat, where there are few varieties available from the private sector, extension publications were found to be the main source of information used for selecting new varieties. Data from these surveys show the importance of a strong and active extension program in ensuring that new varieties with resistance to new diseases/disease races are readily adopted.

Tags:

Pages