surveillance

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Mahto
Nepal Agricultural Research Council (NARC)
Co-authors: 
Suraj Baidya, Dhruba Bahadur Thapa, Roshan Basnet, Sunita Adhikari, Prem Bahadur Magar, Ajaya Karkee, Nabin Dangal, Basistha Acharya, Ram Bahadur Khadka, Junga Bahadur Prasad, Purusottam Jha, Laxman Aryal, Prakash Pantha
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
geographic_area: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Baidya Nath

Rusts are one of major threats to reduce wheat production and productivity in Nepal. Rust fungi are obligate parasite survival during off-season either on voluntary wheat plants or other grass or timber plant species is not yet confirmed in Nepal. High-inputs, suitable hosts and existence of warm humid and cool high lands in different parts of country promote carryover of inoculums of rust fungi. Nepal could be potential sources of yellow rust and leaf rust epidemic for itself and for Indian sub-continent. Surveillance is one of important steps to know status of wheat diseases especially rusts occurrence in country. The SAARC rust tool box is systematic and regular monitoring activity of wheat and barley diseases conducted at various locations in Nepal. Altogether, 183 and 180 locations were surveyed in different parts of Nepal were put in global rust tool box server and validated in fiscal years 2014/15 and 2015/16. Wheat rusts disease scenario has been observed differently, it could be due to climate change and different virulent spectrum of races/pathotypes of rusts fungi and deployment of different wheat varieties. Yellow rust was widely occurred throughout mid hills in Nepal. Higher severity of yellow rust was observed in Kathmandu valley (80S -100S). Leaf rust was moderate to high (10MS-100S) in plain and hills. There was higher score of leaf rust observed in plain as well as in mid hills on susceptible wheat cultivar. Regular monitoring and surveillance at different locations in Nepal has been found helpful in digging out actual problems of wheat crop. Monitoring races of all three rusts occurring in Nepal is necessary for successful planning to manage rusts by deploying effective genes. Rust tool box is important to keep vigilance of new emerging rust races in country. This in turn could increase production and productivity of wheat in Nepal.

Patpour
Global Rust Reference Center (GRRC), Aarhus University, Denmark
Co-authors: 
Mogens Støvring Hovmøller, Jens Grønbech Hansen, Annemarie Fejer Justesen, Tine Thach, Julian Rodriguez-Algab, Dave Hodson, Biagio Randazzo
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
geographic_area: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Mehran

In 2016, severe epidemics of yellow (stripe) rust were observed on durum and bread wheat in European regions where the diseases in the past were insignificant or absent. Stem rust was also observed at epidemic levels for the first time in more than 50 years in Europe. On Sicily, both yellow and stem rust caused epidemics on cultivated durum and bread wheat and numerous breeding lines. In 2017, surveys in farmer fields and trial monitoring were carried out in Southern Italy during April-June. A total of 61 farmer fields and 9 experimental plots were inspected and rust samples collected. Despite unfavourable weather conditions for rust development, stem rust, yellow rust and leaf rust were detected on 86%, 50% and 14% of the surveyed sites, respectively. The surveys on Sicily covered approximately 70% of the durum wheat area, and data uploaded and visualised on the Wheat Rust Toolbox. On mainland Italy and Sardinia, yellow rust was observed, and sampled from nine fields in Sardinia and two in Puglia, whereas stem rust was detected and sampled in experimental plots in Sicily, Sardinia, Puglia, Lazio and Emilia Romagna. A total of 94 samples of stem rust, 30 samples of yellow rust, and 3 rust samples from Berberis aetnensis were sent to GRRC. Preliminary results of yellow rust genotyping and race phenotyping showed prevalence of race Triticale2015. Warrior(-) and a new race (Pst'New'- First detected in 2016) were also detected. For stem rust, TTTTF and TTRTF were detected in Sicily and mainland Italy and TKTTF was identified in Sardinia. Susceptibility of major commercial durum cultivars and breeding lines suggests the need for both durable resistance breeding and systematic surveys coupled to an early warning system.

Farhad
Wheat Research Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Keywords: 
Co-authors: 
Kishwar-E-,Mustarin, Md Mostofa Ali, Reza, Krishna Kanto, Roy, Md. Ashraful, Alam, Md. Rezaul, Kabir, MD Abdil, Hakim, Md Monwar, Hossain, Md Rabiul, Islam, Tim, Krupnik, Md Forhad, Amin, Md. Mosharraf, Hossain, Nure Alam, Siddque, Paritosh Kumar, Malaker, Maricellis, Acevedo, Noresh Chandra Deb, Barma
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Md

Disease surveillance and monitoring has been regularly organized by Wheat Research Centre (WRC), in major wheat growing areas of Bangladesh since 2010-11 to track the current status of common diseases, first outbreak of new disease(s), the pathogen hotspot and identify new virulent races. Besides the paper based traditional survey, scientists of WRC are now using different tools like Smartphone/Tablet with supporting applications. Several trainings were arranged under DGGW project on rust tool box in Bangladesh. Among all smartphone applications, RustSurvey is the easiest and handy application which integrates with the SAARC Surveillance Toolbox.
A disease surveillance program on wheat blast was organized in Mid February 2017 followed by hands on training in collaboration with CIMMYT and CU, USA. Out of 103 sites surveyed, 33 sites were found infected with wheat blast. Overall disease incidence was comparatively lower than the previous season with low disease severity (5-10%). Surveillance program on rust diseases was also conducted in early March 2016. Among 102 rust survey sites stem rust and yellow rust was not found, but leaf rust occurred with varying levels of severity depending on field locations, sowing times and cultivars grown. About 52% of the 102 fields investigated had leaf rust, and almost 73% of the infected fields showed low (<20%), 21% moderate (20-40%) and only 6% showed high (more than 40%) disease severity. Timely (15-30 November) planted crops largely escaped or had less disease compared to those planted late in the season. The predominant cultivar Prodip as well as BARI Gom 25 and 26 showed zero to high disease levels with MSS type reactions. BARI Gom 21, 28, 29 and 30 were free from leaf rust infection. Furthermore, Spot blotch was found in most of the region with low to high level field incidence depending on crop growth stage.

Javaid
Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Co-authors: 
Muhammad,Idrees, Faqir, Muhammad, Arshad, Mehmood, Majid, Nadeem, Saleem-ur, Rehman, Makhdoom, Hussain, Javed, Ahmad, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Muhammad Makky

Under changing climatic conditions, the emergence of new diseases or new races of existing diseases is a serious threat to global wheat production. Particularly, the presence of wheat blast in Bangladesh and stem rust race Ug99 in Iran, created a fearsome and intractable situation for Pakistan. A study was planned for monitoring and surveillance of the wheat blast and rust pathogens in wheat growing districts of Punjab, Pakistan during the cropping season 2016-17 as vigilance program. During the survey, one hundred and seventy one wheat fields of upper and central Punjab region were monitored and two types of Rusts (Leaf Rust & Yellow Rust) were recorded in varying intensity on different varieties of wheat. Out of 171 locations 86 spots were free from both types of rusts i.e. Leaf Rust & Yellow Rust, while the remaining locations were found to be infected with both leaf and yellow rust. However, all the surveyed fields were free from the stem rust infestation. Among the infected fields, 23 were infected by Leaf Rust while 63 fields were infected by Yellow Rust.The susceptible type of rust attack was noticed on old/ banned/ unapproved wheat varieties. Moderately resistant to resistant reaction was observed on newly approved varieties. The rust infected samples having S or MS type infection were collected for race analysis. Similarly, blast suspected samples were analyzed in laboratory and none of the tested samples showed the presence of wheat blast pathogen, which indicates no need to panic but vigilant in future.

Baidya
Plant Pathology Division, Nepal Agricultural Research Council
Keywords: 
Co-authors: 
Baidya Nath Mahto, Durba Bahadur, Thapa Roshan, Basnet Nautan Raj, Gautam Sesh, Raman Upadhyaya
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Suraj

Disease surveillance is very important in establishing the status of disease response in crops. During the 2014 to 2016 wheat seasons, foliar blight (spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana and tan spot caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis) was recorded as severe across the entire whole plains region. Foliar blight was moderate in the mid hills, especially the Kathmandu valley. Leaf rust was severe (10MS - 100S) at several places in the mid hills. This could be due either to climatic conditions or varieties susceptible to the prevailing pathotypes. Yellow rust was also recorded up to 100S in the Kathmandu valley. Newly released varieties Gaura and Dhaulagiri showed yellow rust incidence of 20MS to 40S. Stem rust was sporadic and light and was observed very late in the season (tR - 10MR) in far western districts and the Kathmandu valley. Powdery mildew was moderate and localized. Loose smut was found at low levels throughout the mid hills. In 2014, Karnal bunt (caused by Tilletia indica) was also recorded in far western regions. Five different pathotypes of P. triticina (121R63-1, 21R55, 21R63 and 0R9) and one Pst pathotype (110S119) have prevailed during the last few years. Wheat genotypes were evaluated at Khumaltar and those reputed to have Yr27, Yr27+, Yr27+Yr18, Yr31+APR, Yr9, Yr10 and Yr15 were resistant. Similarly, genotypes containing Lr34+ had lower leaf rust severities than others.

El Amil
Lebanese Agricultural Research Institute
Co-authors: 
Claude de Vallavieille-Pope, Marc Leconte, Mogens Hovmøller, Kumarse Nazari
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Primary Author First Name: 
Rola

Wheat rusts, caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia sp. are serious economic diseases of wheat worldwide. Surveillance, monitoring and new virulence identification are prerequisites for future race prediction and for effective breeding programs. Therefore, we decided to compile the endeavours done for surveillance over eight cropping seasons in Lebanon. The extensive field surveys were conducted yearly in major bread and durum wheat areas over the period 2009-2017 using the Borlaug Global Rust Initiative surveillance protocols. Over eight years, 136 locations were surveyed, 56 samples were collected from mainly stripe and stem rust, and X samples were phenotyped using a robust set of standards differentials lines used worlwide at Tel Hadya - ICARDA, 6 phenotyped at INRA - Grignon, 4 phenotyped at the Global Rust Reference Center (GRRC), until the season 2015-2016 the cereal rust laboratory at LARI became autonomous in race analysis. Six samples were genotyped. The latest phenotyping showed that pathotypes had combinations of the virulence for the widely deployed genes Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr25 and Yr27 resembling to the aggressive strain PstS2, the invasive high temperature tolerant isolate. Resistance genes Yr1, Yr3, Yr4, Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, Yr17, Yr32, and YrSP were effective against all isolates. Race typing of the stem rust sample using the North American stem rust differential sets indicated presence of TKTTF in surveyed wheat growing areas as well as at ICARDA's research station in Terbol. Identified races have been used in field artificial inoculation of ICARDA's breeding program during the last two years. In conclusion, the races PstS2 and TKTTF were the dominant prevalent races in the country for yellow and stem rust respectively. This information could be useful for the region for better integrated disease management and wider diversification of resistance genes deployment in breeding programs.

Afshari
Seed and Plant Improvement Institute (SPII), Iran
Primary Author Email: 
fafshari2003@yahoo.com
Resistance Gene Tags: 
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2015
Abstract Tags: 
geographic_area: 

Stem (black) rust is a potentially important disease in northern, western and southern Iran. A new Pgt race with virulence to gene Sr31 appeared in Iran in 2007. Similar races have spread in Africa and some CWANA countries. In 2014 stem rust was widespread in western, northern, northwestern and central Iran, but at low severities. Thirty-nine stem rust samples were collected for race analysis. After purification and increase each isolate was inoculated to a set of 20 North American differentials in the greenhouse. Infection types were recorded 12-14 days after inoculation using the scale described by McIntosh et al. (1995, Wheat Rusts: An Atlas of Resistance Genes, CSIRO, East Melbourne, Australia). Races TKSTC (59%), TKTTC (20%), TTTTC, KTTSK (virulent on plants with Sr31), TTSTC, PTTTF and TTTTF were detected. Race TKSTC was common in western, northwestern and central Iran. Except for avirulence to Sr17 this race is similar to the race (TKTT) that caused a stem rust epidemic in Ethiopia in 2013.

Saunders
National Institute of Agricultural Botany, UK
Primary Author Email: 
diane.saunders@tgac.ac.uk

Emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans, animals and plants pose a significant hazard to public health and food security. With recent advances in sequencing technology, bacteriologists and virologists are now integrating high-resolution genotypic data into pathogen surveillance activities. However, the application of genomics to emerging filamentous plant pathogens has lagged. To address this, we developed a robust and rapid “field pathogenomics” strategy. We applied this method in 2013 to the wheat yellow rust pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), using gene sequencing of Pst-infected wheat leaves taken directly from the field to gain insight into the population structure of a re-emerging pathogen. Our analysis uncovered a dramatic shift in the Pst population in the UK and supports the hypothesis that recent introduction of a diverse set of exotic Pst lineages may have displaced the previous population. Gene sequencing of infected host tissue can also be leveraged to assess the genotype of the host, rapidly confirming whether previously resistant wheat varieties have indeed been overcome. We have now expanded this study to analyze Pst-infected plant samples from across Europe and beyond and will provide an update on the insights we have gained regarding Pst population dynamics. Working with cross-institutional and industrial partners we are now developing this technique further to reduce cost so it can be applied routinely within the U.K. cereal disease surveillance program.

Mirza
Crop Diseases Research Institute, Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Pakistan
Primary Author Email: 
Mirzajaved2000pk@yahoo.com

Detailed rust surveillance of wheat growing areas in Pakistan was conducted from 2011 to 2014. Information about varietal distribution, growth stage, and rust incidence and severity was collected at 950 locations, and rust samples collected from these locations were subjected to race analysis. Yellow rust showed increasing incidence of high to moderate severity. Commercial cultivars released during 1991 to 2011 showed MS to S reactions. Twenty eight races were identified, most with wide virulence ranges. The frequencies of virulence to Yr1, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr17, Yr27, Yr43, Yr44 and YrExp2 all exceeded 50%. Leaf rust also showed increasing incidence, mainly due to cultivation of the susceptible cv. Sehr-06. Fourteen races were identified. The frequencies of virulence to Lr1, Lr2c, Lr3a, Lr16, Lr26, Lr3c, Lr17a, Lr30, LrB, Lr10, Lr14a, Lr14b and Lr21 exceeded 50%. Virulences to Lr2, Lr9, Lr24, Lr18 and Lr19 were not detected and frequencies of virulence to Lr11 and Lr20 were low. Current and old commercial cultivars showed MS to S reactions. In 2011 and 2014 stem rust incidence was sporadic, but in 2013 it was present at 33 of 232 locations in Sindh, Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Baluchistan. Race RRTTF was identified in all samples.

Natsarishvili
Institute of Phytopathology and Biodiversity, Batumi Shota Rustaveli State University,Georgia
Primary Author Email: 
ketinatsarishvili@yahoo.com

Stripe rust is a worldwide constraint to wheat production. The rust pathogens are assumed to have originated in the Caucasus, from which they disseminated into Western Europe and Asia (Zhukovsky 1965, Euphytica, 14; Stubbs 1985, The Cereal Rusts II). Rust surveys are a useful means to provide information on distribution. More than 400 wheat fields were monitored for rust incidence and severity and for collection of samples at 20 locations in Georgia during 2010-2013. The majority of wheat fields were occupied by Russian cultivars and Bezostaya-1 was the most common, followed by Copper and American cv. Jagger. Yellow rust was the most widely distributed rust, with>65% of fields showing its presence. In 2009 yellow rust incidence was moderate to high. Abundant overwintering inoculum, susceptible cultivars and favorable conditions resulted in severe epidemics in late May and early June 2010. Mean field incidence and severities were 74.8 and 84.6% in the Kakheti zone, and 70 and 68.2% in Kvemo Kartli. Incidence was lower in the following years due to drought and high late spring temperatures. Bezostaya 1 and Jagger showed moderately susceptible reactions to all three rust, but Copper was moderately resistant. Accessions of Georgian endemic species T. carthlicum, T. timopheevi, T. macha, T. georgicum and T. monococcum were resistant to all three rusts.

Pages

Subscribe to surveillance