Surveillance

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Barma
Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Co-authors: 
Paritosh Malaker, Mostofa Reza, Abdul Hakim, Krishna Roy, Rabiul Islam, Thakur Prashad Tiwari, Pawan Kumar Singh, Arun Kumar Joshi
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2018
Abstract Tags: 
Primary Author First Name: 
Naresh

The major diseases of wheat in Bangladesh are leaf blight and leaf rust. Yellow rust occurs occasionally with sporadic infection in the northern parts whereas stem rust was observed only in 2014. So far the country is free of Pgt race Ug99. Wheat blast, a devastating head disease, was first reported in 2016. Currently, about 65% of the wheat area in Bangladesh is covered by leaf rust resistant varieties and about 30% of the area is covered by Ug99 resistant varieties. Surveillance and monitoring of diseases is conducted regularly. In 2017, 102 sites were surveyed of which 52% had leaf rust infection. The data were uploaded to the Wheat Rust Tool Box. A separate surveillance and monitoring of wheat blast was conducted on 421 farmers? fields in 24 districts. Different levels of blast incidence were recorded in 77 fields. The Wheat Research Centre in Bangladesh works with CIMMYT and BGRI to develop high yielding rust resistant varieties. This includes screening for response to Ug99 at KALRO, Kenya. However, the current major concern of wheat is wheat blast. The popular variety BARI Gom 26 is highly susceptible to this disease and no current cultivar in Bangladesh carries an acceptable level of resistance to blast. During 2016-17, 20 varieties and advanced lines from Bangladesh and 80 from CIMMYT Mexico, were evaluated. One elite breeding line, BAW 1260, showed resistance (<10% severity) in multiple environment tests and is also resistant to leaf blight and stem rust. This line carries the 2NS translocation from Aegilops ventricosa and will be released soon for commercial cultivation. Pre-release seed multiplication is already underway for rapid dissemination. Among recently released wheat varieties BARI Gom 30 and BARI Gom 32 are moderately tolerant to blast and are being promoted for wider adoption by farmers.

Marcel Meyer
University of Cambridge
Co-authors: 
J.A. Cox , D.P. Hodson, L. Burgin, M.C. Hort and C.A. Gilligan
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2015
Abstract Tags: 

Use of large-scale computational resources has permitted the first quantitative study of airborne migration routes of fungal spores between numerous key epidemiological hot-spots of wheat stem rust in Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. By coupling a state-of-the-art Lagrangian particle dispersion model (NAME) with mechanistic epidemiological models, we simulate turbulent atmospheric transport of large ensembles of fungal spores from source sites. The models use highly resolved global meteorological datasets from the UK Meteorological Office. We consider release of P. graminis uredinospores from numerous source locations over an 11 year period (2003-2014) and simulate atmospheric trajectories over a 10 km2 spatial sampling grid to elucidate spore deposition rates at national, regional, and continental spatial scales. Our systematic exploration permits the first quantitative perspective and ranking of likely airborne transmission routes of wheat stem rust. We identify migration trends within and between the “Rift valley epidemiological zone”, the Middle East, the Indian Subcontinent, as well as South Africa. Our results indicate (I) consistent seasonal dispersal patterns, (II) likely airborne transmission of stem rust from the Middle East to North-East Africa, and (III) suggest that there is considerable risk of spread of Ug99 or other virulent races from Eastern Yemen to the Indian subcontinent. Model results indicate that over the 11 year study period, viable spore deposition occurred between Eastern Yemen and Pakistan on average 22 days per year during overlapping wheat growing seasons. The validity of the modelling framework has been successfully tested by comparison with survey data from the 2013 epidemic outbreak in Ethiopia, and was recently used as a risk assessment tool to provide rapid response advice in different East-African countries. Known stem rust race distributions are also supportive of the model outputs. The research we have been doing allows a quantitative perspective on likely airborne transmission routes of Ug99 or other virulent races of wheat rust. By that we hope to provide new insights and recommendations for future risk assessment, survey and control strategies and also to contribute to fundamental understanding of epidemiological spread on regional and continental scales. The work we would like to present is the result of a joint effort of Dr Laura Burgin and Dr Matt Hort from the UK Meteorological office, Dr Dave Hodson from CIMMYT, and Dr James Cox, Matthew Hitchings and me from the Epidemiology and Modelling group of Prof Gilligan in Cambridge.

Dave Hodson
CIMMYT-Ethiopia
Co-authors: 
R.F. Park, J. Grønbech-Hansen, P. Lassen, K. Nazari, Y. Jin, M. Hovmøller, L. Szabo, Z.A. Pretorius, T. Fetch, M. Meyer, J.A. Cox, C.A. Gilligan, L. Burgin, M. Hort
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2015
Abstract Tags: 

In response to the threat posed by Ug99 (race TTKSK) and a global expert panel assessment, the Borlaug Global Rust Initiative (BGRI) was formed in 2005. This represented one of the most comprehensive global programs to address an emerging crop pathogen threat. For the last decade, surveillance and monitoring has been a key component of the BGRI. Progress in rust surveillance and monitoring over the last ten years is critically reviewed, with a focus on stem rust. The transition from a data poor environment regarding stem rust to a fully functional, comprehensive crop pathogen surveillance system is a notable success. Key components and status of the current system are described, including; the surveillance network, the data management and information platforms, and pathogen tracking. The application of the existing surveillance and monitoring system and the current status of important stem rust races are described. The role that new technologies are playing in the monitoring and tracking of stem rust is highlighted. Recent stem rust epidemics in East Africa provide stark warning of threat that the disease poses and the clear need to continuously monitor evolving stem rust populations. Shortcomings of the existing system are examined and future directions for the surveillance and monitoring system are outlined. 

Afshari
Seed and Plant Improvement Institute (SPII), Iran
Primary Author Email: 
fafshari2003@yahoo.com
Resistance Gene Tags: 
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2015
Abstract Tags: 
geographic_area: 

Stem (black) rust is a potentially important disease in northern, western and southern Iran. A new Pgt race with virulence to gene Sr31 appeared in Iran in 2007. Similar races have spread in Africa and some CWANA countries. In 2014 stem rust was widespread in western, northern, northwestern and central Iran, but at low severities. Thirty-nine stem rust samples were collected for race analysis. After purification and increase each isolate was inoculated to a set of 20 North American differentials in the greenhouse. Infection types were recorded 12-14 days after inoculation using the scale described by McIntosh et al. (1995, Wheat Rusts: An Atlas of Resistance Genes, CSIRO, East Melbourne, Australia). Races TKSTC (59%), TKTTC (20%), TTTTC, KTTSK (virulent on plants with Sr31), TTSTC, PTTTF and TTTTF were detected. Race TKSTC was common in western, northwestern and central Iran. Except for avirulence to Sr17 this race is similar to the race (TKTT) that caused a stem rust epidemic in Ethiopia in 2013.

Tom Fetch
AAFC, Canada
Co-authors: 
M. S. Chaves, S. German, P. Olivera, P. Campos, Y. Jin, L. Szabo and J. Martinelli
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2014
Abstract Tags: 
geographic_area: 

The discovery of Ug99 stem rust with virulence on most widely grown wheat cultivars worldwide triggered substantial new research on host resistance genes and associated virulence dynamics in the pathogen. Ug99 is mutating and migrating, with eight variants presently known, and has spread throughout eastern Africa, across the Red Sea to Yemen and Iran, and to South Africa. It has been speculated that further movement of Ug99 spores from South Africa to South America could happen on prevailing winds that occur about eight days per month on average. While Ug99 is not yet present in South America, this is a critical entry point into the Western Hemisphere as demonstrated by introduction of soybean rust to Paraguay in 2001. Thus, work was initiated to engage countries in South America to participate in monitoring for its occurrence. Stem rust surveys are currently conducted in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay on a regular basis. Each country has a national agricultural institute with adequate to good capacity to perform pathotyping work, but have limitations due to inadequate greenhouse cooling. We will present the current virulence dynamics of Pgt in each country. In addition to surveys for rust, we searched for the presence of Berberis spp. in Brazil.  Berberis laurina was abundantly distributed in the Rio Grande du Sul state near the city of Caçapava. Leaves sampled in October displayed low to moderate aecial infections. Determination of the pathogen species infecting B. laurina is currently being determined by physiologic and molecular methods. 

Scot Isard
Departments of Plant Pathology and Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Co-authors: 
J. M. Russo
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2011
Abstract Tags: 
geographic_area: 

The risk of aerial long-distance transport of rust pathogens from potential source locations in the Eastern Hemisphere to the Western Hemisphere and from subtropical to continental interior regions within North America is investigated. Simulations of longdistance transport of rust spores using the Integrated Aerobiology Modeling System indicate that the frequency of transport and deposition in the Western Hemisphere of viable rust spores originating from potential sources in tropical Africa, at high latitudes in Europe, and throughout eastern Asia is low. However, the frequency of trans-oceanic transport and deposition of viable rust spores in the Western Hemisphere is high for potential African source locations poleward of the tropics. The relatively short distance between Western Africa and northeastern South America coupled with the presence of persistent Northeasterly Trade Winds create an active pathway for spore transport. Western Hemisphere regions that are influenced by the Intertropical Convergence Zone have the highest likelihood of receiving viable rust spores from the Eastern Hemisphere. The risk of aerial transport of viable rust spores to U.S. regions from potential Eastern Hemisphere source regions is low. Analysis of wind streamline maps for North America indicate that strong low-level advection of air northward from the subtropics is prevalent east of the Rocky Mountains from early April to mid-May providing opportunities for long-distance transport of rust pathogens into the continental interior. After mid-June, the number of days with strong lowlevel advection of air from south to north across these regions and thus opportunities for long-distance spore transport decrease dramatically.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
David Hodson
CIMMYT-Ethiopia
Co-authors: 
K. Nazari, R.F. Park, J. Hansen, P. Lassen, J. Arista, T. Fetch, M. Hovmøller, Y Jin, Z.A. Pretorius, and K. Sonder
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2011
Abstract Tags: 

Detection of stem rust race TTKSK (Ug99) from Uganda in 1998/99 highlighted not only the extremely high vulnerability of the global wheat crop to stem rust but also a lack of adequate global systems to monitor such a threat. Progress in the development and expansion of the Global Cereal Rust Monitoring System (GCRMS) is described. The current situation regarding the Ug99 lineage of races is outlined and the potential for expansion into important wheat areas is considered. The GCRMS has successfully tracked the spread and changes that are occurring within the Ug99 lineage and is now well positioned to detect and monitor future changes. The distribution of Ug99 variants possessing combined virulence to Sr31 and Sr24 is expanding rapidly and future spread outside of Africa is highly likely. Efficient and effective data management is now being achieved via the Wheat Rust Toolbox platform, with an expanding range of dynamic information products being delivered to endusers. Application of new technologies may increase the efficiency of the GCRMS, with mobile devices, molecular diagnostics and remote sensing all seen to have potential application in the medium to longterm. Expansion of the global capacity for race analysis is seen to be critical and integration of the Global Rust Reference Centre into the stem rust monitoring network is seen as a positive development. The current acute situation with severe epidemics of stripe rust in many countries indicates a clear need for more effective global monitoring systems and early warning for this pathogen. The existing GCRMS for stem rust is seen as a good foundation for this to occur.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
Robert Park
The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Co-authors: 
Tom Fetch, Dave Hodson, Yue Jin, Kumarse Nazari, Mohinder Prashar, and Zacharias Pretorius
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2010
Abstract Tags: 

Surveillance of wheat rust pathogens, including assessments of rust incidence and virulence characterization via either trap plots or race (pathotype) surveys, has provided information fundamental in formulating and adopting appropriate national and international policies, investments and strategies in plant protection, plant breeding, seed systems, and in rust pathogen research. Despite many successes from national and regional co-ordination of rust surveillance, few attempts were made to extend rust surveillance to international or even global levels. The Global Cereal Rust Monitoring System was established to address this deficiency. It is underpinned by an information platform that includes standardized protocols for methods and systems used in surveys, preliminary virulence testing, data, sample transmission and management at the field and national and global levels, and includes two web-based visualization tools. While considerable progress has been made towards a global system for monitoring variability in the wheat stem rust pathogen, and linking this to the threat posed by this pathogen to regional wheat production, some challenges remain, including ongoing commitment to support rust surveillance, and the ability to share and compare surveillance data.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
Ruth Wanyera
KALRO-Njoro, Kenya
Co-authors: 
D. Singh, P. Njau, T. Fetch, Y. Jin, D. Hodson, and S. Kilonzo
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2010
Abstract Tags: 
geographic_area: 

Limited but targeted stem rust race characterization was undertaken in Kenya in 2004 and 2005 which led to the detection of Ug99 present in Kenya and designation of Ug99 as race TTKS (based on North American stem rust race nomenclature system). Further surveillance in 2006 and 2007 detected variants of TTKS with virulence on Sr24 (TTKST) and Sr36 (TTTSK), respectively. Stem rust surveillance was undertaken at an extended level in 2008 and 2009 within predominant wheat growing regions of Kenya. Three hundred and sixty farms were surveyed from regional districts of Naivasha, Narok, Nakuru, Laikipia, Meru, Uasin-Gishu, Nandi, Elgeyo and Trans-Nzioa, during 2008 main season (May to September and December). The information from farmers indicated that more than 95% of these farms were sprayed with fungicides. Despite the use of fungicides, stem rust was detected in 67% of the surveyed farms. Stem rust ranged from trace amount -100% in severity with minimum infection in Naivasha district (40%) and maximum in Narok district (90%). Yellow rust was detected in 22% of the farms. Out of one hundred and twenty-six stem rust samples collected, 37 and 39 (a total of 76 ) samples were sent to Cereal Disease Laboratory (CDL) Minnesota, USA and Cereal Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada respectively, for race typing using the respective differentials used by these labs. From the 39 collections sent to Canada, 17 (43%) survived, of which majority were typed to TTKST (65%) followed by TTKSK (18%), PTKST (12%) and mixture of TTKST and TTKSK (5%). The CDL typed vast majority of pathotypes as TTKSK (84%) followed by TTKST and TTTSK (7% each). The combined results of two labs indicated that predominant frequency in Kenya in 2008 was TTKSK (51%) followed by TTKST (31%), PTKST (6%) and TTTSK (6%). The frequency of TTKST significantly increased in 2008 compared to 2007 which is not surprising, given that Sr24 carrying wheat cultivar KS Mwamba is cultivated on large acreage in Kenya. In 2009, 262 farms were surveyed from regional districts of Narok, Laikipia, Nyandarua, Meru, Uasin-Gishu, Nandi, Elgeyo and Trans-Nzioa. The 2009 season experienced heavy drought in many areas. Nevertheless, stem rust was detected in 79% of the farms with disease severity ranging from trace to 100%. Yellow rust was detected in 15% of the farms. Stem rust infection ranged from 0 to 100% with minimum infection in Nyandarua (18%), Laikipia (42%) and maximum in Uasin-Gishu and Elgeyo (100% each). Out of seventy-four stem rust samples collected, 55 samples were sent to Canada for race typing. Only 20% of the samples survived, of which majority were typed to TTKST (50%), PTKST (34%) and PTKSK (16%). Borlaug Global Rust Initiative 2010 Technical Workshop / Poster Abstracts 7 The 2009 results did not depict real situation of predominance of pathogenic variability because of small sample size, however it provided fair indication that race TTKST is still the most prevalent. This information generated on the distribution of stem rust races, and the incidence of stem rust is important for anticipatory breeding and release of cultivars with effective sources of resistance in Kenya, and at same time mitigating global threat of stem rust by reducing intensity of stem rust inoculum in East Africa.

Colin Wellings
The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Co-authors: 
R.P. Singh, A.H. Yahyaoui, K. Nazari, and R.A. McIntosh
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2009
Abstract Tags: 

The purpose of monitoring cereal rust pathogens is to provide a basis for disease control strategies that include breeding for resistance, predicting disease response in commercial cultivars and responding to the dynamics of pathogen change. The means of achieving this vary from regular collection surveys based on assessments of sample collections in greenhouse tests, to monitoring and recording static trap plots. Factors governing the method of approach include the size of the target region, the available research resources and the experience of staff involved. This paper is a brief review of the development of near-isogenic lines as a means of monitoring cereal rust pathogens. Emphasis will be given to wheat stripe/ yellow rust and the development and application of a near-isogenic set of materials based on the spring wheat cultivar Avocet. This parent was selected because of its high degree of susceptibility to the disease, agronomic adaptability (semidwarf, spring habit, moderate vernalisation and day-length requirements), and resistance to stem rust. The relative benefits of using these materials will be discussed in the context of available data.

Complete Poster or Paper: 

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