stripe rust

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Xianming Chen
USDA-ARS Wheat Genetics, Quality, Physiology and Disease Research Unit, Pullman, WA
Co-authors: 
T. Coram, X. L. Huang, M. N. Wang, and A. Dolezal
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2011

Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, continues to cause severe damage worldwide. Durable resistance is a key for sustainable control of the disease. High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance, which expresses when the weather becomes warm and plants grow old, has been demonstrated to be durable. We have conducted numerous of studies for understanding molecular mechanisms of different types of stripe rust resistance using a transcriptomics approach. Through comparing gene expression patterns with racespecific, all-stage resistance controlled by various genes, we found that a greater diversity of genes is involved in HTAP resistance. The genes involved in HTAP resistance are induced more slowly and their expression induction is less dramatic than genes involved in all-stage resistance. The high diversity of genes and less dramatic expression induction may explain the durability and incomplete level of HTAP resistance. Identification of transcripts may be helpful in identifying resistance controlled by different genes and in selecting better combinations of genes for pyramiding to achieve adequate and more durable resistance.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
Kumarse Nazari
ICARDA
Resistance Gene Tags: 
Co-authors: 
D. Hodson, M. Hovmøller
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2011
Abstract Tags: 
geographic_area: 

Asia and North Africa (CWANA). The total acreage in CWANA is approximately 53 million hectares. Wheat stripe (yellow) rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) continuously poses a serious threat to wheat production in CWANA. Several factors have contributed to the current severe epidemics of stripe rust, including; the rapid shift of virulence in the pathogen population, genetic uniformitity of mega-cultivars, favorability of environmental conditions, and an overlapping/ continuous crop calendar. During 1985-1997 the widespread appearance of Yr9 virulent pathotypes in CWANA, and eventually in the Indian sub-continent, resulted in several epidemics that caused a series of severe crop losses in popular cultivars known to be protected by the Yr9 resistance gene. Following the Yr9 virulence epidemics, susceptible cultivars were extensively replaced with CIMMYT-derived germplasm such as Kauz, Atilla, Opata, Nacozari, Bucbuc and Crow. The resistance of many of the replacement cultivars, including the mega-cultivars in India (PBW343), Pakistan (Inquilab-91, Bakhtwar), Iran (Chamran, Shiroudi), Ethiopia (Kubsa), and Syria (Cham 8) was based on Yr27. Breakdown of Yr27 resistance in PBW343, Inquilab 91 and Chamran, in India, Pakistan, and Iran, respectively, was reported between 2002-2004. Although occasional stripe rust outbreaks appeared in some areas, unfavorable environmental conditions presumably restricted the increase of the Yr27 Pst population until 2009, when conducive environmental conditions resulted in severe epidemics in several CWANA countries e.g., Morocco, Algeria, Uzbekistan, Turkey, Iran, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Afghanistan. Environmental conditions favouring rust development continued into 2010, with mild winters and adequate rainfall in several CWANA countries resulting in early outbreaks of stripe rust. The 2010 stripe rust outbreaks occurred throughout the major wheat growing areas in the CWANA and Caucasus countries, causing severe yield losses particularly in Syria where Cham 8 (with Yr27) occupied more than 70% of the wheat areas. Inspite of favorable environmental conditions in many areas in CWANA in 2011, similar severe stripe rust epidemics have not been reported to date. Climate change now appears to be playing a major role in Pst population dynamics in CWANA. Direct, multiple affects of climatic changes on epidemiology of rust pathogens are expected, including the survival of primary inoculum, the rate of disease development, duration of rust epidemics, and development and distribution of rust populations. Emergence of stripe rust in non-traditional areas, changes in the frequency of new race evolution, early infection of stripe rust, shifts in predicted pathways of rust migrations, and finally wide spread epidemics of stripe rust in warmer areas as a potential indicator of adaptation to high temperatures are considered as possible consequences of climatic changes. Regional pathogen surveys indicated the widespread distribution of aggressive Pst pathoype (s) with adaptation to higher temperature. In the absence of resistant varieties, fungicide application remains the only practical measure to control stripe rust. Effective disease surveillance and monitoring systems, coupled to timely application of fungicides has effectively controlled stripe rust epidemics in Iran, Turkey, and Syria during 2010-11. Regional monitoring of pathogen variability and disease development must be undertaken as a matter of high priority, and timely chemical control measures will continue to play a major role for control of stripe rust in CWANA in the short-term. In the medium to long-term, existing resistant varieties and advanced breeding lines need to be promoted and susceptible varieties have to be urgently replaced.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
Yue Jin
USDA-ARS, Cereal Disease Laboratory
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2010

The common barberry and several other Berberis spp. serve as the alternate hosts to two important rust pathogens of small grains and grasses, Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis. Barberry eradication has been practiced for centuries as a means to control stem rust. Diverse virulence variations have been observed in populations of P. graminis f. sp. tritici that were associated with susceptible barberries in North America. Barberry likely has played a role in generating new races of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici in some regions in the world. Several North American stem rust races, namely races 56, 15B and QCC, initially originated from barberry, were subsequently responsible for generating large-scale epidemics. Thus, sexual cycles on Berberis spp. may generate virulence combinations that could have serious consequences to cereal crop production.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
Colin Wellings
The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Poster or Plenary?: 
Plenary
BGRI Year: 
2010
Abstract Tags: 

Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis, has been an important disease of wheat, barley, rye, triticale and certain graminaceous hosts for centuries. The significance of the disease on cultivated cereals has waxed and waned according to the vagaries of climate, inoculum levels and susceptible varieties. A progressive understanding of pathogen biology has revealed levels of specialisation between and within host groups, and these had varying impacts on the hosts concerned. The most economically important form is P. striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the causal pathogen of stripe (yellow) rust of wheat, which is the major focus of this paper. The recent discovery of the perfect stage of Pst on Berberis spp. will encourage further work to uncover the potential importance of the sexual stage in pathogen biology in regions where Berberis spp. occur. A review of the evolution of pathotypes within Pst over the past 50 years reveals recurrent pandemics emanating from a combination of specific virulence in the pathogen population, wide scale cultivation of genetically similar varieties, and agronomic practices that led to high yield potential. When these factors operate in concert, regional stripe rust epidemics have proven to be dramatic, extensive and serious in terms of the magnitude of losses and the economic hardships endured. A review of these epidemics suggests that little progress has been made in containing the worst effects of epidemics. The current status of stripe rust was gauged from a survey of 25 pathologists and breeders directly associated with the disease. It was evident that Pst remains a significant threat in the majority of wheat growing regions of the world with potential to inflict regular regional crop losses ranging from 0.1 to 5%, with rare events giving losses of 5 to 25%. Regions with current vulnerability include the USA (particularly Pacific North West), East Asia (China north-west and south-west), South Asia (Nepal), Oceania (Australia) and East Africa (Kenya). The resources deployed to contain the worst effects of Pst will need to find a balance between training a new generation of breeders and pathologists in host-pathogen genetics, and an investment in infrastructure in IARCs and NARs.

Complete Poster or Paper: 
Urmil Bansal
The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
Resistance Gene Tags: 
Co-authors: 
Vivi Arief, Hanif Miah, Ian H DeLacy, and Harbans S Bariana
Poster or Plenary?: 
Poster
BGRI Year: 
2010

Association mapping detects correlations between genotypes and phenotypes in a sample of individuals based on the linkage disequilibrium and can be used to uncover new genetic variation among germplasm collections. Two hundred and five landraces collected by the English botanist A. Watkins in the 1920s were screened for rust response variation under field conditions during three crop seasons. An integrated map of 350 polymorphic DArT markers was developed. Association mapping identified the involvement of several genomic regions in controlling resistance to three rust diseases. Seven, eight and nine genomic regions, respectively, appeared to carry yet uncharacterized leaf rust, stripe rust and stem rust resistance. Three dimensional analyses indicated genetic association of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance in some accessions, whereas no such association was observed between stem rust resistance and resistance to either of the other two rust diseases. A new stripe rust resistance locus, Yr47, has been named. 

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