All BGRI Abstracts

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Pathogenic diversity in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from Pakistan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Javed Iqbal Mirza Crop Diseases Research Institute, PARC Substation, Murree Pakistan
Sufyan,Muhammad, Abid Majeed, Satti, Munir, Anjum, Fayyaz, Muhammad, Atiq ur Rehman, Rattu, Imtiaz, Muhammad, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

225 Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici isolates collected from wheat growing areas of Pakistan during 2013-2016 were analyzed using 18 near isogenic yellow rust differentials. Seventy eight races were identified among collection in which 20 were common (n > 2). Rest of the races were very rare and encountered only once (n=1). Races 574212, 574232, 474232, 474233, 574213 and 434232 were most frequent (n> 15). Pathogenic diversity analysis of the collection reveal high diversity (H =3.57) of the P. striiformis population of pakistan. On the basis of phenotypic response to yellow rust genes, the most frequent races could be grouped into 5 diverse groups. Distinct grouping was also observed in rarely encountered isolates. Most of the races were highly complex and 80% isolates had complexity ranging from 8 to 11. Virulence frequency for Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr17, Yr27, Yr43 & YrExp2 remained above 80% while that of Yr1, Yr9 and Yr44 remained over 40%. Partial virulence was detected for Yr5, while virulence to Yr10, Yr15, YrSP was found in < 4% isolates. Paper discuss spatial and temporal distribution of P. striiformis races in Pakistan.

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Reaction of Bhutanese wheat cultivars and differential lines to rust diseases at mid and low altitudes in Bhutan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sangay Chophel National Plant Protection Center
Namgay Om, Thinlay, Ugyen Yangchen

Wheat rusts are one of the important diseases that limit the production and downgrade wheat quality. Three rust diseases of wheat are stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks., stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks., and leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks. This study was conducted to determine the reaction of wheat varieties to wheat rusts at different altitudes. Field experiments were conducted from December 2016 to March 2017 at Mendagang (27.5886°N, 89.8711°E, 1332 masl), Punakha Dzongkhag (district) for mid altitude and at Agriculture Research and Development Center (ARDC), Samtenling (26.9058°N, 90.4308°E, 378 masl), Sarpang Dzongkhag, Bhutan for low altitude. The experiment followed a RCBD with 15 treatments comprising of three Bhutanese released varieties, eight SAARC varieties, and four ICARDA varieties. Each treatment was replicated three times. Assessment of disease incidence and severity were performed three times starting from tillering to ripening stage, approximately at 60, 90 and 120 days after sowing (DAS). Disease severity was determined following the modified Cobb’s disease rating scale. Of the 15 varieties, only 11 germinated in both the sites. Among the three wheat rust diseases, only leaf rust was observed in both sites. Leaf rust incidences ranged from 2.5 to 10% and 2.5 to 16% at mid and low altitudes respectively. Disease severity of 5 to 20%, corresponding to field response of immune (5O) to moderately resistant (20MR), was observed at mid altitude, while 5 to 100%, with immune (5O) to susceptible (100S), was observed at low altitude. There was a significant difference in disease incidence by site (p=.038) but not in disease severity (p=.129). The variety, ICARDA 1, with 100% severity was highly susceptible (100S) to leaf rust at low altitude while Bajosokha Kaa remained immune (5O) in both the sites. The results indicate that leaf rust can occur in both low and mid altitudes; however selection of suitable varieties requires more extensive studies.

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An ABA-induced sugar transporter gene TaSTP1 reinforces wheat susceptibility to Puccinia striiformis

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Baoyu Huai State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas and College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Yangling
Lijing Pang, Pu Yuan, Shoujun Hu, Jie Liu, Zhensheng Kang

Pathogens, whatever their types, develop at the expense of the nutrients generated by host and it is largely assumed that classical sources turn into sinks when colonized by pathogens. Sugar appears to be the major carbon and energy source transferred from the host to pathogens. Uptake, exchanges and competition for sugar, at biotrophic interfaces, are controlled by membrane transporters and their regulation patterns are essential in determining the outcome of plant-fungal interactions. However, mechanisms of transport and transporters involved in carbon partitioning between organisms are still poorly understood.
In this study, a wheat sugar transporter protein (STP) gene, TaSTP1, was cloned from a wheat-Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) interaction cDNA library. Transcripts of TaSTP1 were up-regulated in wheat leaves that were infected by Pst or had experienced exogenous ABA and certain abiotic treatments. Heterologous mutant complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that TaSTP1 transports a broad-spectrum monosaccharides including glucose, fructose, mannose and galactose. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis protoplasts suggested that TaSTP1 is localized in plasma membrane. Yeast two hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) validated oligomerization of TaSTP1. Knocking down TaSTP1 using the barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing system reduced the susceptibility of wheat to the Pst virulent pathotype CYR31. Hyphal abnormality was significantly observed in VIGS plants. These results suggest that TaSTP1 may directly or indirectly participate in sugar transport in the wheat-Pst interactions and exert influence on suagr supply of Pst.

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Genetic analysis and location of resistance genes to wheat stripe rust in Chinese landrace Sifangmai

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Jianlu Sun Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Jing Feng, Ruiming Lin, Fengtao Wang, Qiang Yao, Qingyun Guo, Shichang Xu

Wheat stripe rust is an important air borne disease caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, and seriously threatens the safety of wheat production. Breeding and utilization of resistant varieties is the most economical, safe and effective measure to control wheat stripe rust. Sifangmai is a landrace from the state of Guangxi, China, and maintains good resistance to the current epidemic species CYR34, CYR33, CYR32 and CYR29 in China. Sifangmai was crossed with Taichung 29 to obtain F1, F2 and F2:3 to analyze its character of inheritance. In the adult stage, the cross of Sifangmai /Taichung 29 was inoculated by CYR32. The genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Sifangmai to CYR32 was controlled by a dominant gene, named as YrSF. A mapping population of F2 was genotyped with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. SSR loci Xgpw8015, Xgpw4098, Xwmc73, Xgpw8092, Xgpw7309 and Xbarc89 on 5B chromosome showed polymorphic between Taichung 29, Sifangmai, and resistant and susceptible pools, indicating that the resistant gene in Sifangmai was located on the 5B chromosome. The linkage map of these SSR markers was constructed and the nearest SSR to the gene is Xgpw8015. A set of Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic lines was used to confirm YrSF on chromosome 5B. YrSF is different from known genes in chromosome 5B. Xgpw8015 can be used as a marker for detection of YrSF.

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Genetic Improvement in Quality, Grain Yield and Yield Associated Traits of Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum var.durum L.) in Ethiopia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mekuria Dejene Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research

Information about changes associated with advances in crop breeding is essential for understanding yield-limiting factors and developing new strategies for future breeding programmes. Thirty-six durum wheat varieties released since 1966 were evaluated in three replications of the Randomized Complete Design at Debre Zeit and Akaki, Ethiopia during the 2016 cropping season to estimate the amount of genetic gain made over time in grain yield potential, yield-associated traits and in protein content. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among varieties for all 16 quantitative traits, protein content and protein harvest in Kg ha-1 at each of the locations. Grain yield varied between 1.66t ha-1 for Arendato released in 1966 to 3.90t ha-1 for Megenagna released in 2012 with mean of 2.952t ha-1 at Debre Zeit. At Akaki yield range was between 2.45 and 5.04t ha-1 with mean of 3.992t ha-1. 25 varieties surpassed Arendato (3.754t ha-1) at this location. In the combined ANOVA significant difference between the varieties was observed only for spike length, spikelets spike-1, grains spikelet, grains spike-1, plant height, days to flowering, thousand grain weight and hectoliter weight. Varieties specifically adapted to only one of the locations, widely adapted varieties and varieties not adapted to any of the locations were identified. Regression analysis revealed that grain yield has increased by 22kg ha-1 year-1 since 1966; an increase of 40.6% over yield in 1966. This was accompanied with a significant decline of 11.4% in spike length, 6.7% in spikelets spike-1, 17.9% in protein content and 31.2% in protein yield ha-1 and a significant increase of 41.1% in grains spikelet-1, 32.9% in number of grains spike-1, 22.3% in thousand grain weight, 17.8% in grain filling period, 23.9% in seed growth rate, 40.1% in grain yield production rate, 7.9% in harvest index.

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Identification and characterization of winter wheat germplasm resistant to stem rust in Kenya and Turkey

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Beyhan Akin International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Nilufer,Akci, Sridhar, Bhavani, Mesut, Keser, Fatih, Ozdemir, Ruth, Wanyera, Alexey, Morgounov, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A diverse set of winter wheat germplasm was screened for resistance to stem rust in large-scale trials in Kenya and Turkey during 2009-16. The study aimed to select resistant material and characterize types of resistance and possible genes, as well as evaluate agronomic traits and resistance to other diseases to select superior variety candidates and parental lines. The study material was comprised of various Facultative and Winter Wheat Observation Nurseries (FAWWON), which are developed and distributed by the International Winter Wheat Improvement Program (www.iwwip.org) in Turkey. More than 1600 global accessions were screened, with most evaluated for two years. Based on stem rust data from Kenya, more than 400 genotypes were identified exhibiting adequate levels of resistance to the Ug99 race group. The highest number of resistant lines originated from IWWIP (~170), USA (~100), Russia (~40), Iran (~30), Romania (~20), and South Africa (~20). Material was also tested at two sites in Turkey: Haymana (artificial inoculation) and Kastamonu (natural infection). There was no significant correlation between stem rust severities in Kenya and in Turkey, due to differences in stem rust pathotypes. However, a set of germplasm (more than 100 entries) has been identified as resistant in both countries. This set represents promising material as variety candidates and parental lines; another study is currently identifying the genes controlling the stem rust resistance in this population. IWWIP distributed stem rust resistant germplasm to its global collaborators during 2010-2015, in response to the threat from the Ug99 race group. New resistant germplasm combining broad adaptation, high yields, and resistance to other diseases is available on request.

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Towards a public breeding decision support system: Data analysis and management activities in CIMMYT's Global Wheat Program

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Umesh Rosyara CIMMYT
Rosemary,Shrestha, Kate, Dreher, Victor, Jun Ulat, Luis A., Pubela Luna, Susanne, Dresigacker, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Global Wheat Program of CIMMYT is one of the largest public breeding programs in the world consisting of millions of lines/ genotypes derived from thousands of crosses evaluated under using a shuttle breeding cycle and multi-environment testing. The germplasm is phenotyped for conventional (such as yield and grain quality) as well as non-conventional traits (physiological traits) in field and greenhouse conditions. The breeding germplasm is also screened with genome-wide markers (using Illumina SNP array, genotyping-by-sequencing, or DArTseq platforms) and/or multiple gene/QTL region-specific molecular markers (using KASP platform). All genotyped samples are registered in the "DNA SampleTracker," a software system for tracking DNA samples developed at CIMMYT. In collaboration with High Throughput Genotyping Platform project, the plant sample and data collection methods are optimized. Meanwhile, the extensive wheat genealogies and phenotypic information have been maintained in the International Wheat Information System and will be transferred to a new Enterprise Breeding System. Furthermore, several bioinformatics/statistical genetics methods with the objectives of gene discovery and genomic prediction have been developed and utilized for optimizing genomics-assisted selection. The wheat team is a member of "Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII)" which aims to develop and implement genomic data management systems to enhance the capacity of breeding programs. Under this initiative, a new genomics database has been built and a pilot wheat version is being tested at CIMMYT. Several decision support tools are also under collaborative development, such as a Genomic Selection Pipeline based on Galaxy, Flapjack-based F1/line verification, and marker assisted backcrossing tools. Additional tools are envisioned for the future including a Cross-Assistor and Selection-Assistor. The ultimate aim is to seamlessly connect the genomic database, phenotypic database, and decision support tools to support the breeding selection process and to lead to the development of cultivars with increased rates of genetic gain.

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Marker assisted backcross breeding for incorporation of rust resistance in Indian wheat varieties

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Chandra Nath Mishra ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal
Satish Kumar, Rekha Malik, Garima Singhroha, Vinod Tiwari, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Breeding rust resistant cultivars using conventional methods is time-consuming, complex and slow, but molecular markers offer a rapid alternative for developing cultivars with improved disease resistance. Three wheat cultivars, DBW88, DBW107, and DBW110, from different production zones were used as recipients for incorporation of resistance genes using a marker-assisted backcross (MAB) breeding approach. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr32 is being incorporated into all the three varieties, stripe rust resistance gene Yr15 is being incorporated into DBW88 and DBW107, and stem rust resistance gene Sr26 is being added to variety DBW110. Lines PBW703 (Yr15), FLW15 (Lr32) and Avocet (Sr26) were used as donors. Six cross combinations viz., DBW88/PBW703, DBW107/PBW703, DBW88/FLW15, DBW107/FLW15, DBW110/FLW15 and DBW110/Sr26 were made at Karnal during 2015-16 and the crosses were grown at IIWBR-RS, Dalang Maidan for backcrossing. BC1F1 plants were raised at Karnal during 2016-17. Both foreground and background selections were practiced in each combination. SSR markers gwm264 and barc135 were used for foreground selection of Lr32, marker barc8 was used for selection of Yr15, and markers Sr26#43 and BE518379 were used to detect presence and absence of Sr26. From 90 to 127 polymorphic SSR markers chosen for each cross from an initial set of 800 screened on the parents are being used for background selection.

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Effect of Stem Rust (Puccinia graminis f.sp.tritici) on Quality of Durum Wheat (Triticum tu gidum) in Ethiopia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ashenafi Degete Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Debre Zeit Research Centre
Alemayehu,Chala, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici is one of the major biotic constraints of wheat production. The disease may cause substantial quantitative and qualitative yield losses. However, much of the work in Ethiopia on this pathosystem focuses on quantitative yield loss and qualitative losses are often overlooked. Hence the current research was designed with the objectives to evaluate the effect of stem rust on physical and chemical quality of durum wheat and assess the relationships between disease intensity and quality parameters. For this purpose, a factorial field experiment was conducted at Debre Zeit Agricultural Research Centre during main and off seasons of 2016/17. The experiment involved six durum wheat varieties (Denbi, Hitosa, Tob.66, Mukiye, Ude and Mengudo) with different level of resistance to stem rust, and three Tilt spray schedules of Tilt?250 E.C at 7, 14 and 21 days. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design in factorial arrangements with three replications and untreated checks were included for comparison purpose. Results revealed significant variations in disease parameters and crop performance among spray schedules, wheat varieties and their interactions. Stem rust severity was the lowest on moderately susceptible and susceptible varieties treated with the Tilt at 7th day schedule. The highest stem rust severity (46.67%) was recorded on variety Hitosa without Tilt spray. Without Tilt treatment Denbi variety accounts protein content of 15.67% which is a false protein. At 7th day spray schedule this variety showed 12.90 % of grain protein content which is normal. There was a significant positive correlation between grain protein and stem rust severity (0.31**). There was significant negative relationships between terminal stem rust severity and thousand kernel weight, hectolitre weight, seed size and yield during off and main seasons were resulted, respectively.

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Virulence to Yr10 and Yr24 in Mexican yellow rust fungal population and implications for CIMMYT durum and bread wheat germplasm

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Julio Huerta-Espino INIFAP, Mexico
Ravi Singh, Karim Ammar

Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis tritici (Pst), continues its evolution towards virulence to race-specific resistance genes. Identification of Mexican Pst isolates MEX16-03 and MEX16.04 that changed infection types of Yr10 testers from 1 to 9 and for Yr24 (=Yr26) testers from 3 to 9 indicated that a mutation for virulence to these resistance genes has occurred in a predominant race detected in 2014 and maintained at CIMMYT as MEX14.191 and at INIFAP as CMEX14.25. Isolate MEX14.191 was responsible for the susceptibility of popular varieties Nana F2007 and Luminaria F2014 grown in central Mexican highlands. Isolate MEX16.04 has the following avirulence/virulence formula: Yr1, 5, 15, SP/Yr2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, (17), 24, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32 using the Avocet near-isolines and other known testers. Virulence to Yr10 and Yr24 (=Yr26) were also confirmed by testing seedlings of cultivars Moro (Yr10), Chuanmai 42, and Neimai 836 (Yr24). Seedling tests carried on 200 bread wheat, 550 durum, and 460 synthetic hexaploid wheats with their respective durum parents from CIMMYT collection indicated that MEX16.03 and MEX16.04 do not represent a major threat because a majority of the lines remained resistant to these isolates. However, it is worth mentioning that durum cultivars, such as Khofa, Desert King, Anatoly, Movas, and Llareta INIA, and 10 primary synthetic hexaploid or synthetic-derived bread wheats that were resistant to MEX14.191 became susceptible to MEX16.03 and MEX16.04. Our results indicate that resistance gene Yr10 was absent and Yr24 occurred in low frequency in CIMMYT bread wheat germplasm. A majority of CIMMYT durum wheat possibly carried Yr24 in combination with other effective gene(s).

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