All BGRI Abstracts

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Speed breeding with genomic selection to accelerate genetic gain for yield in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Amy Watson University of Queensland
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Genomic selection (GS) in wheat can accelerate yield gain principally through a reduction in breeding cycle duration. A method for rapid generation advance called ?speed breeding? (SB) enables up to six generations of spring wheat per year, and could be used to accelerate breeding population development and be combined with GS in various breeding schemes to enable even further gains. SB and GS could be combined through a variety of different scenarios using single seed descent and also by applying GS to segregating populations in the glasshouse. Selected lines could then go into multi-location field trials for final selections and to obtain information for updating the prediction model. The increase in speed in these scenarios compared with field-based breeding schemes could greatly improve genetic gain for valuable target traits, such as yield. To test these hypotheses, a 260 multi-parent spring wheat population, genotyped with 8,000 DArT polymorphic markers, underwent yield trials over three years. Yield prediction accuracy was accessed using five-fold cross validation and predicting across years. Using these results, the rate of genetic gain achieved through either phenotypic selection in the field or a combination of SB and GS in the glasshouse were calculated. Results indicate that incorporating GS into SB growing systems would result in a higher rate of genetic gain compared to phenotypic or more traditional GS breeding schemes, due to the greater number of generations produced per year. This approach may be able to be coupled with multi-trait GS prediction models to increase accuracy, advance genetic gain and wheat variety development.

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Resistance to race TKTTF of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici with virulence to SrTmp gene in Ethiopian bread wheat lines

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Worku Bulbula Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research
Ashenafi,Gemechu, Habtamu, Tesfaye, Zerihun, Tadesse, Habtemariam, Zegeye, Netsanet, Bacha, Ayele, Badebo, Bekele, Abeyo, Pablo, Olivera, Matthew, Rouse, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) is the major wheat production constraint in Ethiopia causing recurrent epidemics that resulted in the withdrawal of widely grown wheat cultivars from production. Among the current Pgt races detected in Ethiopia, TKTTF is the most frequent and has caused a severe epidemic in the south wheat growing regions (Bale and Arsi) after its first detection in 2012. Therefore, to avert the current situation, identifying sources of resistance to race TKTTF in breeding germplasm is a top priority to the National Wheat Breeding Program. Hence, 82 promising bread wheat lines including five check cultivars were evaluated in Debre Zeit in a TKTTF single race nursery for three consecutive seasons, 2014-2016. Ethiopian bread wheat cultivar Digalu was used as a spreader row and was inoculated using a single isolate of race TKTTF at different growth stages. The nursery was bounded by oat to reduce interference with any other stem rust race. The 82 lines were tested in the greenhouse at Cereal Disease Laboratory and were also tested with known diagnostic molecular markers. Twenty-nine lines displayed low levels of terminal stem rust severity in the field and low coefficient of infections. Fourty-one lines were resistant to race TKTTF at the seedling stage. Bread wheat lines resistant to TKTTF are valuable sources of resistance that can be deployed in wheat growing regions of Ethiopia prone to stem rust.

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Genetics of yield components for drought tolerant wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sharmin Ashraf University of Agriculture, faisalabad
ihsan,khaliq, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Drought tolerance is a polygenic trait, with a complicated phenotype, often confused by plant phenology. Breeding for water stress is more complex since there are many types of abiotic stresses, such as drought, heat and salt. High yielding wheat genotypes viz., Miraj-06, 9452, 9469, 9272, 9277, CMS-127 and three testers Chakwal-50,
Kohistan-97 and Aas-11 were crossed in line ? tester mating design. Seed obtained from crosses was evaluated in field conditions for various agronomic traits under drought conditions. Recorded data were subjected to analysis of variance to determine the genetic variability. The data were analyzed statistically and combining ability
studies were tested using line ? tester analysis to find the relationship between different traits of wheat. High significant differences were observed among the lines and testers for yield related traits under stress conditions.

The female line 9452 proved to be best line on the basis of mean performance of traits under water stress. In case of testers, the male parent variety Chakwal-50 retained its performance in maximum number of traits closely followed by Aas-11. The cross combination 9272 ? Aas-11 proved best for attaining highest mean for most of
traits. In case of GCA effects line 9277 and tester Aas-11 proved best. The cross combinations 9277 ? Chakwal-50, 9452 ? Kohistan-97 exhibited highest SCA effects. The superior genotypes and crosses can be combined to develop new promising and improved varieties under water stress conditions.

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Adaptability of Wheat Varieties in Strongly Acidic Soils of Sylhet in Search of Low pH Tolerant Wheat Variety

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ataur Rahman Wheat Research Centre, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
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The soils of the entire Sylhet region of Bangladesh are strongly acidic where lands remain fallow during winter season due to scarcity of irrigation water required for rice cultivation. There is a scope of wheat expansion in this region as the water requirement of wheat is less than Boro rice. Field experimens were carried out at South-Surma, Sylhet, in 2012-13 and at FSRD site Jalalpur, Sylhet in 2013-14, in collaboration of WRC and OFRD. BARI examined the response of seven wheat varieties at two levels of lime in split-plot design where lime was applied in main plots and different wheat varieties were grown in sub-plots. The seeds were sown on December 05, 2012 and November 30, 2013 for the growing season of 2012-13 and 2013-14, respectively. The wheat varieties used in this study were Shatabdi, Sufi, Sourav, Bijoy, Prodip, BARI GOM 25 and BARI GOM 26. The index of relative performance of each variety in comparison to mean yield of all varieties under the contrast conditions of liming and non-liming was estimated to determine relative adaptability of wheat variety under experimental soil conditions. The result indicated that most of the yield components viz. spikes/m2, thousand grain weight and grain yield of wheat were significantly improved by liming for both the years and locations. There were variations in lime response among the wheat varieties. The index of relative adaptability (IRA%) for yield of BARI GOM 26 and Bijoy was more than 100% for both the years. The result indicated that these two wheat varieties are relatively tolerant to low pH and could be adapted in acidic soil of Sylhet.

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A new stem rust resistance locus detected in wheat variety Yalta

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Davinder Singh University of Sydney
Robert,Park, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

To monitor evolution and pathogenic variability of wheat stem rust pathogen (Puccina graminis f. sp. tritici) in Australia, the Australian Cereal Rust Control program regularly conducts national annual surveys. Recently, we detected a new pathotype 34-1,2,5,7 (culture # 661) virulent on stem rust resistance genes Sr5, Sr6, Sr7b, Sr9g, Sr11, Sr15 and Sr17. Although virulent on Sr11, this pathotype produced a low infection type (IT 22+C/X) on the Sr11-differential genotype Yalta, indicating that Yalta carries an uncharacterised resistance (SrY) in addition to Sr11. To characterize SrY, we screened a RIL population Yalta/W2691 (104 lines) with two pathotypes: 21-0 (avirulent on Sr11 or AA) and the newly identified 34-1,2,5,7 (virulent on Sr11 but avirulent on SrY or BB). Yalta produced low infection types, "1C" and "22+C/X" with pathotypes 21-0 and 34-1,2,5,7, respectively, whereas W2691 was susceptible to both pathotypes. The population segregated for AA/aa (35 Res: 69 Sus) and BB/bb (36 Res: 68 Sus) loci with pathotypes 21-0 and 34-1,2,5,7, respectively. The observed segregation (AA/aa and BB/bb) however failed to fit with predicted single gene 1:1 model (P<0.05) with both pathotypes. Joint segregation analysis (AA/aa vs BB/bb) also significantly deviated (P<0.01) from 1:1:1:1 (AABB:AAbb:aaBB:aabb) genetic model. It appears that population is skewed towards susceptibility in each case either by chance or differential gametic transmission as reported previously in progenies derived from crosses involving variety Yalta. The segregation pattern (AABB and aabb) with two pathotypes was, however, highly coupled apart from 13 lines, of which, 6 lines (AAbb) were susceptible with 21-0 and resistant with 34-1,2,5,7, and 7 lines (aaBB) resistant with 21-0 and susceptible with 34-1,2,5,7, showing that the two loci are linked (?2 linkage = 76.9; P<0.001) and located very close to each other. If that is the case, it may imply that SrY is common in wheats carrying Sr11. Cultivar Charter has been used in India to differentiate pathotypes virulent for Sr11, suggesting that Charter also carries a second stem rust locus (SrC) possibly corresponding with SrY. Further studies and mapping work are underway to determine the genetic relationship between SrY, SrC and Sr11.

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Virulence of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Population to 18 NILs in Yunnan Province, China

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mingju Li Institute of Agricultural Environment and Resources, Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China
Xianming,Chen, Anmin, Wan, Jiasheng, Chen, Mingliang, Ding, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, Pst) is the most destructive disease of wheat worldwide. Breeding and planting resistant cultivars is the most economic, effective, as well as environmental methods to control the disease. Yunnan is a severe epidemic zone in China, which provides new incursions for other parts of China. Study on virulence of the Pst population and effectiveness of resistance genes, will provide information for breeding and rational use of resistance genes. One hundred and thirty-six136 isolates collected from 9 regions of Yunnan were tested using a set of 18 Yr NILs with genes Yr1, Yr5, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr10, Yr15, Yr17, Yr24, Yr27, Yr32, Yr43, Yr44, YrSP, YrTr1, YrExp2, YrTyTye. Stripe rust races were named by octal code. The results showed that the Pst population in Yunnan is highly variable in races and virulence. A total of 64 races were identified and the top two most frequent races were 550273 (Virulence/Avirulence formula: 1, 6, 7, 9, 27, 43, 44, SP, Exp2, Tye / 5, 8, 10, 15, 17, 24, 32, Tr1 and 550073(Virulence/Avirulence Formula: 1, 6, 7, 9, 43, 44, SP, Exp2, Tye / 5, 8, 10, 15, 17, 24, 27, 32,Tr1), with frequency of 28.68% and 11.76%, respectively. The remaining races had frequencies less than 5.0%. No virulence were found for Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, and Yr32. The frequencies of virulence to Yr24, YrTr1, Yr8, and Yr17 ranged from 0.74% to 11.76%. The frequency of virulence to Yr27 was 52.94%; and virulence to Yr1, Yr6, Yr7, Yr9, Yr43, Yr44, YrSP, YrExp2, and YrTye ranged from 79.94% to 91.91%. The results will guide the breeding and wheat production. (This study was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant No. 31260417 and 31560490)

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Progress in breeding for biofortified wheat and identification of genomic regions for enhanced grain zinc and iron in wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Velu Govindan CIMMYT
Leonardo,Crespo-Hererra, Julio, Huerta, Ravi, Singh, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Malnutrition affects more than 2 billion people across the globe, particularly zinc and iron deficiency causes major health problem in developing world. The biofortified staple food crops such as wheat, is an important channel to contribute to the hidden hunger problem in low income countries. Breeding for enhanced zinc concentration in wheat was initiated by crossing high zinc sources identified among synthetic wheats, T. dicoccum, T. spelta and landraces. These crosses have resulted in wheat varieties with competitive yields and enhanced grain zinc were adapted by farmers in South Asia. CIMMYT-derived early-maturity wheat cultivar 'Zinc-Shakti' with about 40% increased zinc (+14 ppm), is now grown in eastern India through public-private partners. The two CIMMYT-derived biofortified varieties: 'WB2' and 'HPBW01' released in 2016 for northwestern plains zone of India. In Pakistan, 'Zincol' was released in 2016. The first high zinc wheat variety (Bari-Gom 33) with better resistance to wheat blast have been released in Bangladesh for commercial cultivation in 2017. Targeted crosses with increased population sizes were used to obtain superior progeny lines that have high zinc levels in combination with other essential traits. This has resulted in the incorporation of several novel alleles for grain zinc and iron in elite, high-yielding germplasm. High zinc and iron are under quantitative genetic control and further progress is possible as multiple QTL are pyramided in high yielding wheats. High-throughput, non-destructive phenotyping for grain zinc and iron using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis has facilitated the selection dramatically. Gene discovery and mapping studies leading to the utilization of markers to further improve the breeding efficiency. Rapid adoption of high zinc wheat varieties in South Asia and beyond is expected with the second wave of high zinc wheat lines with superior yield, heat and drought tolerance and resistance to rusts and other foliar diseases.

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Two phases of an adult plant resistance response in wheat to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Howard Castelyn University of the Free State, South Africa
Nelzo,Ereful, Botma, Visser, Lesley, Boyd, Zakkie, Pretorius, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Adult plant resistance (APR) to stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is often conferred by multiple minor genes and has the potential to be durable. A preceding project identified two Kenyan wheat lines (W1406 and W6979) from the Genome Resource Unit (Norwich, UK) that exhibit APR to Pgt. The aim of this study was to investigate the APR response to Pgt race PTKST in W1406 and W6979 compared to 37-07, a susceptible control line. Histological investigation of inoculated flag leaf sheaths indicated a significant and quantifiable decrease in Pgt colony size in the APR lines at 120 hours post inoculation (hpi). Molecular analysis supported the observed fungal biomass decrease in the APR lines at 120 hpi. RNAseq analysis identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed in W1406 and 166 transcripts in W6979 when comparing 24 and 72 hpi to 0 hpi. In W1406 transcripts encoding putative pectinesterases, lipid-transfer proteins and leucine-rich repeat-like proteins were induced at 72 hpi. In W6979 only a corresponding putative pectinesterase encoding transcript was identified. Although the induced defence response in the two APR lines exhibited some dissimilarity, it potentially involves cell wall modification in both lines. Two independent sets of peroxidases were induced at 24 and 72 hpi in both lines, suggesting independent signalling events. Expression analysis suggests the occurrence of two phases of gene expression, one at 24 hpi and another at 72 hpi; the latter seeming to correspond to the inhibition of Pgt growth, manifesting as the observed APR phenotype.

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Durum wheat genome reveals the signature of 10,000 years of selection

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Luigi Cattivelli CREA Research Centre for Genomics and Bioinformatics
,International Durum Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The domestication of wild emmer wheat ~10,000 years ago by early agrarian societies have led to the selection of domesticated emmer and subsequently of durum wheat through a process of selection for non-brittle rachis and free-threshing forms. Durum wheat and became established as a prominent crop only ~1,500-2,000 years ago. We have completed the 10.45 Gb assembly of the 14 chromosomes of the modern DW cultivar 'Svevo' and provides, via comparison with the wild emmer assembly, an account of the genome-wide modifications imposed by 10,000 years of selection and breeding on the genome architecture of tetraploid wheat. A number of regions that were under selection during the domestication of wild emmer or the subsequent selection of durum wheat have been identified. Furthermore, we have projected on the durum wheat genome about 1,500 QTLs for morphological phenological and quality traits, grain yield components and disease resistance reported from published biparental mapping or GWAS. NBS-LRR genes are prominently involved in signaling and plant disease resistance. The durum wheat genome contains more than 66,000 genes and among them we annotated about 1,500 complete NBS-LRR genes. A similar number was found in the wild emmer genomes, nevertheless the comparison of the two genomes has identified some NBS-LRR genes specific for durum wheat. The availability of the complete genome of durum wheat will speed up the identification and the isolation of new resistance genes as well as the breeding for high-yielding and more resilient cultivars.

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Three years of the Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platform for diseases in Uruguay: current status and future prospects

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Gustavo Azzimonti Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (INIA), Estaci?n La Estanzuela, Ruta 50, Km 11, Colonia, Uruguay
Vanesa,Domeniguini, N?stor, Gonz?lez, Richard, Garcia, Carolina, Saint-Pierre, Pawan, Singh, Mart?n, Quincke, Silvia, Pereyra, Silvia, Germ?n, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Since 2014 CGIAR-WHEAT Program has promoted the establishment of a network of field-based Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platforms (PWPP) to expand the existing collaborations between CIMMYT, ICARDA and National Agricultural Research System partners. The main goals are improving the quality of data collected and shared among institutions to enhance and accelerate the international wheat breeding, and promote synergism with the private sector and nongovernmental organizations. In 2015, the PWPP-Uruguay was established to test genotypes for multiple diseases: leaf rust, Fusarium head blight and Septoria tritici blotch. These diseases are phenotyped each year in separate field trials artificially inoculated with pathogen isolates identified as representatives of the pathogen regional population. Wheat material is sowed in plots with susceptible checks every 50 entries. Disease severity and other variables related to the disease development are measured using standard international scales at dates when the expression of plant resistance is optimal. In the first three years of the platform, more than 1500 genotypes were screened per year. These materials had diverse origins (more than eight institutions, public and private, from eight countries) and diverse types: from recent commercialized to ancient cultivars, advanced lines, International CIMMYT nurseries, mapping populations or panels. Highly resistant genotypes to multiple diseases could be selected. At the present time, we are developing and adopting advanced phenotyping methods, combining remote sensing and image analysis, and exploring their adaptation to breeding constraints. Also, extension activities as internships, training courses and student projects are being developed. Major future prospects are the enhancement of data and germplasm exchange between platform partners and the PWPP network and the involvement in collaborative phenotyping/genotyping breeding projects.

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