All BGRI Abstracts

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Identification of resistant sources against rusts of wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Muhammad Fayyaz Crop Diseases Research Institute, National Agricultural Research Center, Park Road Islamabad, Pakistan
Anjum Munir, Khalil Ahmed Khanzad, Javed Iqbal Mirza, Shahzad Asad, Atiq ur Rehman Rattu, Muahmmad Imtiaz

Evaluation of candidate lines to develop resistant varieties at multiplications in Pakistan is a regular activity which has been successfully done for many years. This approach assists in generation of future resistant cultivars around appropriate genes combinations thereby providing durable resistance outputs for wheat productivity. This year, National Uniform Wheat Yield Trial (NUWYT) comprised of 60 candidate lines. Among these 15 lines were also present in the last years NUWYT. The two years data revealed that there was only one line V-12066 resistant to all three rusts during the two consecutive seasons 2015-16 and 2016-17. Four candidate lines NR-487, V-122557, PR-115 and NRL-1123 were found resistant to yellow and leaf rust during 2015-16 and 2016-17. A candidate line DN-111 was found resistant to leaf and stem rust. There were three lines NW-1-8183-8, NW-5-20-1 and MSH which were found resistant to leaf rust only during two consecutive seasons. Similarly, two candidate lines V-122559 and QS-3 were found resistant to stem rust only, while one line NR-443 was resistant to yellow rust only. The present study provide the screening and evaluation system of Pakistan for promoting and releasing the resistant wheat varieties.

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Economic impact of front line demonstrations on wheat in the Semi-Arid tropics of western Maharashtra, India

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vijendra Baviskar Agharkar Research Institute Pune
Vijendra Baviskar, Balgounda Honrao, yashavanthakumar kakanur, Vilas Surve, Deepak Bankar, Vitthal Gite, Ajit Chavan, Vijay Khade, Juned Bagwan, Shrikant Khairanar, Sameer Raskar

Frontline demonstrations (FLDs,) on wheat were conducted by Agharkar Research Institute, Pune, during last five rabi seasons from 2012-13 to 2016-17 at farmer's fields of Pune and Satara district under wheat growing area of semi-arid tropics of western Maharashtra, India. Before conducting FLDs, a group meeting held every year in the selected village and specific skill training had imparted to the randomly selected farmers regarding adoption of different improved aspects of cultivation. FLDs comprised of improved wheat varieties viz., MACS 6222, MACS 6478, MACS 3125 (d) and MACS 2971(dic) for Peninsular Zone of India. About 50 ha of FLDs on improved wheat varieties were conducted with active participation of 50 farmers covered an average of 10 farmers and 10 ha per year. Two recent varieties, MACS 6222 and MACS 6478 had shown higher grain yield, ranging between 15 to 55 per cent more over local check and farmer practice than all other FLDs. Recommended packages and practices of wheat FLDs gave higher value of yield, net return and high benefit cost ratio as compared to local check over the years of study. The study has revealed that five years mean extension gap of 4.48 to 9.67 q/ha and technology gap ranging between 11.00 to 22.22 q/ha depending on the variety during the period of study. Net returns of Rs. 63042/ha was observed from improved practice than in the farmer's practice of Rs. 50108/ha and with benefit cost ratio of 3.07 and 2.79 respectively. On average basis, the incremental benefit cost ratio was found as 2.83. In frontline demonstrations, the yield potential of wheat has been enhanced largely due to the increase in the knowledge of farming community and adoption of improved production techniques by farmers.

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Mitigating temperature stress by timely planting of wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ghulam Mahboob Subhani Wheat Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Javed Ahmad, Abid Mahmood

Wheat is an important cereal crop and staple food in Pakistan. Most of the wheat is cultivated late after cotton, rice and sugarcane. Introduction of long duration Bt cotton varieties further pushed its sowing to late December or even early January. Late sowing of wheat crop results in yield loss in the Punjab province. A study has been conducted in experimental fields of Wheat Research Institute, AARI, Faisalabad, Pakistan to find out the possible reasons of low grain yields in late sown crop. Twelve experimental wheat lines were planted on seven sowing dates starting from 1st November to 30th December with ten days interval. The experimental design was a factorial combination of seven sowing dates as main plots and twelve varieties/ genotypes as subplots in a split-plot design with three replications. Effect of temperature on several crop growth stages was studied. Mean minimum temperature during the month of December, 2016 and January, 2017 remained below 5?C and mean maximum was more than 30?C during March 2017. Weather conditions experienced by the crop at each developmental stage were compared with the optimum conditions required on that specific stage in each sowing date. It was revealed that in late sown crop, different phonological/growth stages of the crop and yield components and grain yield were affected negatively. It was concluded from the study that the late sown crop suffered from two types of temperature stresses. The late sown crop faced low temperature stress at starting phase which result in delayed germination and low tillering. At caryopsis formation and grain filling the same crop face high temperature stress causing reduced grain formation and shriveled grains due to enforced maturity. Sowing of wheat at proper time i.e., by the end of November was recommended to fetch maximum yields.

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Stem rust resistance in durum wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Pablo Olivera University of Minnesota
Ayele Badebo, Worku Bulbula, Matthew Rouse, Yue Jin

Our research objective is to identify new resistance genes in durum wheat that are effective against TTKSK and other significant stem rust pathogen races that could be utilized in durum breeding. We characterized 8,000 accessions for stem rust response in the field (Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, and St. Paul, MN). Accessions with resistant to moderately resistant responses in multiple field evaluations were evaluated at the seedling stage for resistance to races TTKSK, TRTTF, TTTTF, JRCQC, TKTTF, and six representative U.S. races. We identified 438 durum accessions resistant to moderately resistant in all field evaluations. Among the field-resistant accessions, 273 were resistant to all races used in seedling evaluations. Accessions susceptible at the seedling stage are being evaluated for the presence of adult plant resistance genes. The highest frequencies of resistant lines include landraces from East and North Africa (Ethiopia and Egypt) and advanced breeding lines and cultivars from North America (Mexico and USA). DNA markers will be performed to identify the presence of durum stem rust resistance genes, including Sr13, Sr8155B1, Sr11, and Sr8a. Nineteen resistant accessions were selected to investigate the genetics of TTKSK and TRTTF resistance. Results from evaluating F2 and F2:3 generations from biparental crosses revealed that resistance to race TTKSK was conferred mostly by one or two genes with dominant and recessive actions. Additional resistance genes were identified when populations were evaluated against race TRTTF. A bulk segregant analysis approach is being used to map the resistance in selected lines using the 90K SNP platform.

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Barberry plays a role in spreading inoculums to wheat fields to cause stripe rust in China

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Jie Zhao College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, China
Yuanyuan Zhao, Shuxia Zuo, Dan Zheng, Lili Huang, Zhengshen Kang

Wheat stripe rust, caused by basidiomycete fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a damaging disease worldwide. The recent discovery demonstrated the fungus depends on living wheat and aecial hosts, mainly barberry (Berberis) species, to complete its life cycle. In China, we determined that, under natural conditions, the sexual cycle of Pst occurs based on collections of Pst isolates from the diseased barberry in the past three years. However, no direct evidence to support whether barberry plays a role in spreading inoculums to wheat field to cause stripe rust was detected. In the present study, we recovered 103 Pst samples from natural-infected B. shensiana in the western Shaanxi in spring 2016, and also collected 107 Pst isolates from neighboring wheat fields. Phenotype and genotype of the two Pst populations were tested using a set of Chinese differential hosts for Pst and SSR markers, respectively. The phenotype tests showed that 57 race types produced from the barberry-derived Pst populations, consisting of 58 known races, such as CYR 34, CYR32, G22-14, and Su11-14-3, and 45 new races. Many of the two Pst populations shared the same race types. The genotype tests indicated the barberry-derived Pst population produced a rich genotype, obviously higher than the wheat-derived Pst populations. The seven same genotypes were found on 40 isolates of the former and 26 of the latter. Our results provide evidence to support that sexual cycle of Pst occurs regularly in nature in China and that barberry provides inoculums to neighboring wheat fields, triggering stripe rust infections in the spring. This could be a reason why the Chinese Pst populations represent extreme genetic diversity.

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Development of bread wheat cultivars for resistance to stem rust for cultivation in north zone of Iran

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Manoochehr Khodarahmi Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
Kamal Shahbazi, Jabbar Alt Jafarby, Mohammad Sadegh Khavarinejad, Farzad Afshari, Farshad Bakhtiar, Habibollah Soghi

In this project to obtain resistant wheat breeding lines/cultivars to stem rust disease, new cultivars and lines of the north breeding program were evaluated in greenhouse with races collected in 2014 from northern regions of Iran, Moghan and Gorgan. Artificial inoculation in greenhouse indicated none of the races had virulence on Sr11, Sr13, Sr24, Sr25, Sr26, Sr27, Sr29, Sr31, Sr32, Sr33, Sr37, Sr39, Sr40, and SrTmp. In order to evaluate seedling resistance, 143 wheat cultivars and new lines under greenhouse conditions were inoculated with four isolates of stem rust in four separate experiments in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Evaluation of the northern germplasm under greenhouse conditions showed that some of the genotypes were resistant against all four isolates. The resistance of some of these new lines was also confirmed in Kenya. Regarding other desirable agronomic characteristics, some of these lines will be introduced as new cultivars in the northern region of Iran.

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Myo-inositol phosphate synthase as a molecular switch influencing plant growth and immunity via ethylene and brassinosteroid

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Naveen Sharma Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Delhi South Campus
Paramjit Khurana

L-myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS; EC 5.5.1.4) have been involved in abiotic stress tolerance and its disruption leads to spontaneous cell death and enhanced tolerance to pathogen. However, its molecular mechanism underlying role of MIPS in growth, immunity and abiotic stress tolerance remains unknown. To delve deeper into the conserved molecular mechanism of MIPS action during growth and stress condition, we characterized the overexpression transgenic of TaMIPS and mutant lines of AtMIPS1. Subsequent, transcriptome analysis revealed the activation of ET/JA dependent immune response in transgenic and SA defense response in mutant. Pull-down analysis revealed the interaction of TaMIPS2 with ethylene synthesis (ACO) and signaling protein (CTR1) component. Due to the established role of ethylene during the skotomorphogenesis, we investigated the effect of myo-inositol phosphate synthase role in ethylene response during hook formation. Our results thus suggest the requirement of MIPS for ethylene response and regulating the growth and immunity.

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EMS derived changes in susceptibility to P. triticina in wheat.

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
John Fellers USDA-ARS HWWGRU

P. triticina has a biotrophic relationship with wheat and needs certain elements from the wheat host for a successful life cycle. In recent years, several long lasting, minor resistance genes have been cloned, and their function suggests that the resistance is not due to a classic NB-LRR gene, but a gene that functions in a biotrophic pathway. The hypothesis was proposed that modification of a susceptibility gene can provide broad, long lasting resistance. To test this hypothesis, Thatcher was treated with EMS and screened for changes in susceptibility. M5 lines were evaluated in the greenhouse with BBBD Race 1 and 5 lines were identified. Also, M5 lines were planted in the field to verify the resistance and test the resistance effectiveness to natural infections of P. triticina. The same five lines were resistant in the field. Resistance ranged from few pustules, a race specific-like reaction, lesion mimics with few or no pustules, and near immunity. These lines were backcrossed to Thatcher, and resistant F2 plants were bulked and sequenced. Gene candidates will be identified and discussed.

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System biology to decipher regulatory network hubs that control Zymoseptoria tritici-wheat infection process

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sarrah Ben M'Barek Laboratory of Molecular Plant Physiology, Biotechnology Center of Borj Cedria (CBBC)
Mahmoud Gargouri, Hesham A.Y Gibriel, Richard B. Todd, Michael F. Seidl, Gerrit H.J. Kema

Septoria tritici blotch disease, caused by the fungus Zymoseptoria tritici, is a major threat to global wheat production. With the recent advances in high-throughput DNA-based technologies, Z. tritici has become a powerful model system for the discovery of candidate determinants that underlie virulence and host specialization. Although a few important virulence/regulatory genes have been identified, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. Therefore, to uncover the transcriptional regulatory networks of the infection cycle and most particularly the regulatory hubs that control the switch between the biotrophic and necrotrophic phases, we applied an integrated approach combining transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics analyses based on the identification of plant and fungal transcription factors and regulators, which we characterized from the newly annotated genome sequence of the reference isolate IPO323 (Grandaubert et al., 2015) and using datasets from Rudd et al. (2015). Bread wheat transcription factors and regulators were identified by querying the proteome and subsequent categorization from the Plant Transcription Factor database (PTFDB). Similarly, Z. tritici transcription factors and regulators were identified and categorized using the PFAM TF family databases, and following fungal transcription factor rules as outlined by Todd et al. (2014) and rules we developed for fungal transcription regulators. Insights into transcription factors and regulators will enable synthetic biology approaches to alter the Z. tritici-wheat interaction and lead to rewiring of the regulatory networks thereby turning off the fungal infection process. Beyond providing insights into the regulatory systems-levels involved in Z. tritici-wheat interaction, we believe that our dataset and approach sets the stage for an emerging series of studies that will decipher the dynamic regulatory networks in other plant-pathogen interactions.

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Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) of resistance to stem and stripe (yellow) rust in Iranian wheat cultivars and elite lines

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Muhammad Massub Tehseen Department of Field Crops, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey
Kumarse Nazari, Mehran Patpour, Davinder Singh, Aladdin Hamwieh

Rust diseases in wheat are the major threat to wheat production and yield gains. The breakdown in resistance of certain major genes and new emerging aggressive races of rusts are causing serious concerns in all main wheat growing areas of the world. Therefore, it is the need of the hour to search for new sources of resistance genes or QTL's for effective utilization in future breeding programs. In total 100 wheat genotypes were evaluated for seedling and adult-plant resistance to stem rust races TKTTF and TTKSK at Tel Hadya-Syria, and Njoro-Kenya, and Kelardasht-Iran. Evaluation to Yr27 virulent stripe rust race was carried out at Tel Hadya and Terbol-Lebanon research stations. In this study we used genome wide association studies (GWAS) to identify markers or QTLs linked to stem rust and stripe rust races using Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT?) in selected 35 Iranian wheat genotypes. The association of markers and phenotypes was carried out using a unified mixed-model approach (MLM) as implemented in the genome association and prediction integrated tool (GAPIT). Out of 3,072 markers, 986 were polymorphic and used for marker trait associations. A total of 44 DArT markers were identified to be significantly (p<=0.01) associated with studied traits in 16 genomic regions 1A, 1B, 2A, 4A, 6A, 7A, 1B.1R, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 5B.7B, 6B, 7D and an unknown region. Among associated markers, 34 were linked to stem and nine to stripe rust. They were found on 16 genomic regions on chromosome arms 1A, 1B, 2A, 4A, 6A, 7A, 1B.1R, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 5B.7B, 6B, 7D and an unknown region. Associated markers explained phenotypic variation ranging from 21 to 65%. In addition to validation of previously identified genes, this study revealed new QTL's linked to stem and stripe rust which will assist breeders to develop new resistant varieties.

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