All BGRI Abstracts

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Race analysis of Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici in Iran-2017

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Farzad Afshari Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization, Karaj, Iran.
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Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. trirtici (Pst) is an important disease in many parts of Iran. Over last two decades several epidemics have occurred in Iran causing the breakdown of widely utilized sources of resistance in wheat cultivars. Fifty isolates were collected from different parts of Iran during 2017. Eight isolates of Pst. from 2017 have been processed to date for race analysis. Infection types were assessed on a 0-9 scale 16 and 18 days after inoculation using a scale similar to that described by McNeal et al. (1971). Infection types (ITs) 7 to 9 were regarded as virulent (susceptible) and lower than 7 were avirulent. Pathotypes 102E158A+,Yr27; 6E158A+,Yr27; 102E158A+,Yr27; 166E154A+,Yr27; 38E174A+; 38E158A+,Yr27; 238E190A+,Yr27 and 38E190A+,Yr27 were identified. Pathotype 238E190A+,Yr27+ (from West of Iran) was more aggressive during this study. Plants with Yr1, Yr4, Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, Yr24 and YrSP were resistant to all pathotypes. Pathotypes with virulence on plant with gene/s Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr25, Yr26, Yr27, Yr32, YrSD, YrSU, YrND and YrA were more common. Seedling tests of Iranian wheat cultivars to race 238E190A+,Yr27+ showed that the new released cultivars that included Parsi, Baharan, Bahar, Pishgam, Zareh, Urom, Maihan, Dena, Haydarei and Shabrang were resistant to the new aggressive race with virulence on plants with Yr27.

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Identification and characterization of winter wheat germplasm resistant to stem rust in Kenya and Turkey

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Beyhan Akin International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.K. 39 Emek 06511 Ankara, Turkey
Nilufer,Akci, Sridhar, Bhavani, Mesut, Keser, Fatih, Ozdemir, Ruth, Wanyera, Alexey, Morgounov, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A diverse set of winter wheat germplasm was screened for resistance to stem rust in large-scale trials in Kenya and Turkey during 2009-16. The study aimed to select resistant material and characterize types of resistance and possible genes, as well as evaluate agronomic traits and resistance to other diseases to select superior variety candidates and parental lines. The study material was comprised of various Facultative and Winter Wheat Observation Nurseries (FAWWON), which are developed and distributed by the International Winter Wheat Improvement Program (www.iwwip.org) in Turkey. More than 1600 global accessions were screened, with most evaluated for two years. Based on stem rust data from Kenya, more than 400 genotypes were identified exhibiting adequate levels of resistance to the Ug99 race group. The highest number of resistant lines originated from IWWIP (~170), USA (~100), Russia (~40), Iran (~30), Romania (~20), and South Africa (~20). Material was also tested at two sites in Turkey: Haymana (artificial inoculation) and Kastamonu (natural infection). There was no significant correlation between stem rust severities in Kenya and in Turkey, due to differences in stem rust pathotypes. However, a set of germplasm (more than 100 entries) has been identified as resistant in both countries. This set represents promising material as variety candidates and parental lines; another study is currently identifying the genes controlling the stem rust resistance in this population. IWWIP distributed stem rust resistant germplasm to its global collaborators during 2010-2015, in response to the threat from the Ug99 race group. New resistant germplasm combining broad adaptation, high yields, and resistance to other diseases is available on request.

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Towards a public breeding decision support system: Data analysis and management activities in CIMMYT's Global Wheat Program

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Umesh Rosyara CIMMYT
Rosemary,Shrestha, Kate, Dreher, Victor, Jun Ulat, Luis A., Pubela Luna, Susanne, Dresigacker, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Global Wheat Program of CIMMYT is one of the largest public breeding programs in the world consisting of millions of lines/ genotypes derived from thousands of crosses evaluated under using a shuttle breeding cycle and multi-environment testing. The germplasm is phenotyped for conventional (such as yield and grain quality) as well as non-conventional traits (physiological traits) in field and greenhouse conditions. The breeding germplasm is also screened with genome-wide markers (using Illumina SNP array, genotyping-by-sequencing, or DArTseq platforms) and/or multiple gene/QTL region-specific molecular markers (using KASP platform). All genotyped samples are registered in the "DNA SampleTracker," a software system for tracking DNA samples developed at CIMMYT. In collaboration with High Throughput Genotyping Platform project, the plant sample and data collection methods are optimized. Meanwhile, the extensive wheat genealogies and phenotypic information have been maintained in the International Wheat Information System and will be transferred to a new Enterprise Breeding System. Furthermore, several bioinformatics/statistical genetics methods with the objectives of gene discovery and genomic prediction have been developed and utilized for optimizing genomics-assisted selection. The wheat team is a member of "Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII)" which aims to develop and implement genomic data management systems to enhance the capacity of breeding programs. Under this initiative, a new genomics database has been built and a pilot wheat version is being tested at CIMMYT. Several decision support tools are also under collaborative development, such as a Genomic Selection Pipeline based on Galaxy, Flapjack-based F1/line verification, and marker assisted backcrossing tools. Additional tools are envisioned for the future including a Cross-Assistor and Selection-Assistor. The ultimate aim is to seamlessly connect the genomic database, phenotypic database, and decision support tools to support the breeding selection process and to lead to the development of cultivars with increased rates of genetic gain.

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Marker assisted backcross breeding for incorporation of rust resistance in Indian wheat varieties

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Chandra Nath Mishra ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal
Satish Kumar, Rekha Malik, Garima Singhroha, Vinod Tiwari, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Breeding rust resistant cultivars using conventional methods is time-consuming, complex and slow, but molecular markers offer a rapid alternative for developing cultivars with improved disease resistance. Three wheat cultivars, DBW88, DBW107, and DBW110, from different production zones were used as recipients for incorporation of resistance genes using a marker-assisted backcross (MAB) breeding approach. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr32 is being incorporated into all the three varieties, stripe rust resistance gene Yr15 is being incorporated into DBW88 and DBW107, and stem rust resistance gene Sr26 is being added to variety DBW110. Lines PBW703 (Yr15), FLW15 (Lr32) and Avocet (Sr26) were used as donors. Six cross combinations viz., DBW88/PBW703, DBW107/PBW703, DBW88/FLW15, DBW107/FLW15, DBW110/FLW15 and DBW110/Sr26 were made at Karnal during 2015-16 and the crosses were grown at IIWBR-RS, Dalang Maidan for backcrossing. BC1F1 plants were raised at Karnal during 2016-17. Both foreground and background selections were practiced in each combination. SSR markers gwm264 and barc135 were used for foreground selection of Lr32, marker barc8 was used for selection of Yr15, and markers Sr26#43 and BE518379 were used to detect presence and absence of Sr26. From 90 to 127 polymorphic SSR markers chosen for each cross from an initial set of 800 screened on the parents are being used for background selection.

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Virulence to Yr10 and Yr24 in Mexican yellow rust fungal population and implications for CIMMYT durum and bread wheat germplasm

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Julio Huerta-Espino INIFAP, Mexico
Ravi Singh, Karim Ammar

Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis tritici (Pst), continues its evolution towards virulence to race-specific resistance genes. Identification of Mexican Pst isolates MEX16-03 and MEX16.04 that changed infection types of Yr10 testers from 1 to 9 and for Yr24 (=Yr26) testers from 3 to 9 indicated that a mutation for virulence to these resistance genes has occurred in a predominant race detected in 2014 and maintained at CIMMYT as MEX14.191 and at INIFAP as CMEX14.25. Isolate MEX14.191 was responsible for the susceptibility of popular varieties Nana F2007 and Luminaria F2014 grown in central Mexican highlands. Isolate MEX16.04 has the following avirulence/virulence formula: Yr1, 5, 15, SP/Yr2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, (17), 24, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32 using the Avocet near-isolines and other known testers. Virulence to Yr10 and Yr24 (=Yr26) were also confirmed by testing seedlings of cultivars Moro (Yr10), Chuanmai 42, and Neimai 836 (Yr24). Seedling tests carried on 200 bread wheat, 550 durum, and 460 synthetic hexaploid wheats with their respective durum parents from CIMMYT collection indicated that MEX16.03 and MEX16.04 do not represent a major threat because a majority of the lines remained resistant to these isolates. However, it is worth mentioning that durum cultivars, such as Khofa, Desert King, Anatoly, Movas, and Llareta INIA, and 10 primary synthetic hexaploid or synthetic-derived bread wheats that were resistant to MEX14.191 became susceptible to MEX16.03 and MEX16.04. Our results indicate that resistance gene Yr10 was absent and Yr24 occurred in low frequency in CIMMYT bread wheat germplasm. A majority of CIMMYT durum wheat possibly carried Yr24 in combination with other effective gene(s).

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GENETIC MAPPING OF SEEDLING AND ADULT PLANT RESISTANCE FOR STRIPE RUST IN SPRING BREAD WHEAT (TRITICUM AESTIVUM L.)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Yewubdar Isehtu Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)

Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp.tritici, is one of the major diseases of wheat in the world. Experiments were carried out at two sites in Ethiopia (Kulumsa and Meraro) during the 2015 cropping season to evaluate the response of 198 elite bread wheat genotypes and two checks to the prevailing races of stripe rust at adult plant and seedling stage. The genetic profile of these genotypes was assessed using 13006 SNP markers and an association mapping was explored to determine marker?trait association. About 72.5% and 42.5% of the lines exhibited resistance at Kulumsa and Meraro, respectively. Out of 198 genotypes tested in the greenhouse, 31% exhibited common resistance for Kubsa and mixed stripe rust isolate. Only 8966 of the SNPs were polymorphic, only these were used for association mapping analysis. These markers spanned an average density of 3.47 cM per marker, with the poorest density on the D genome. Almost half of these markers were on known chromosomes, but had no position on the consensus map of bread wheat. Analysis of population structure revealed the existence of three clusters and the estimated genomic wide Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) decay in this study ranged from 0 to 50 cM. 53 SNPs in ten genomic regions located on wheat chromosome 1AL, 2AL, 2BL, 2DL, 3BL, 4BL, 4DL, 5AS, 7AL and 7BL were identified. Thirty nine SNP markers in five genomic regions at Kulumsa and 14 SNP markers in six genomic regions at Meraro explained more than 25.5% and 35.1% of phenotypic variability respectively. For seedling stage, 21 markers in ten genomic regions located on wheat chromosomes 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 4B, 4D, 5A, 6B and 7B were associated with resistant. These loci may be useful for choosing parents and incorporating new resistance genes into locally adapted cultivars.

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A large nested association mapping population to map agronomic QTL and smallholder farmers preference in Ethiopian durum wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Matteo Dell'Acqua Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna
Yosef G.,Kidane, Cherinet, Alem, Bogale, Nigir, Dejene, Mengistu, Carlo, Fadda, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Ethiopian plateau hosts thousands of durum wheat landraces cultivated in low input agriculture conducted by an estimated 70 million smallholder farmers. Having thoroughly characterized the phenotypic and molecular uniqueness of Ethiopian durum wheat landraces, we produced a large nested association mapping (NAM) population harnessing their mostly untapped diversity in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RIL). The NAM founders are 50 landraces providing valuable traits such as drought tolerance and resistance to pests, and maximizing molecular diversity. Each selected landrace was crossed to a durum wheat line with an international background (Asassa), establishing independent interconnected bi-parental families, for a total of 6,280 RILs currently in F8. The Ethiopian NAM is at once i) a powerful QTL mapping tool that will side the increasing availability of genomic tools in wheat towards high-throughput candidate genes identification, and ii) a large pre-breeding panel closing the gap between local and international materials. Here we discuss the molecular and phenotypic characterization of twelve NAM families, represented by 100 RILs each. The 1,200 NAM RIL showed elevated allelic variation and a genetic structure reminiscent of the breeding design followed. The NAM RILs were phenotyped for ten agronomic and five disease traits in multiple locations in the Ethiopian highlands. A quantitative method eliciting smallholder farmers traditional knowledge was used to record local farmers appreciation of NAM RILs in all phenotyping locations. We report that the superior genetic properties of the NAM can be used to map QTL for both agronomic and farmer traits with unprecedented precision. The most promising NAM RILs can be identified combining farmers appreciation and agronomic measures, and prioritized for introgression of Ethiopian landraces traits in breeding pipelines aiming at higher uptake and productivity in local agriculture.

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Easy method to select plants with two effective leaf rust resistance genes from wheat hybrid populations

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Lev Tyryshkin All-Russian Institute of Plant Genetic Resources

Wheat varieties with single effective gene for leaf rust resistance often quickly become susceptible because of multiplication of virulent Puccinia triticina genotypes. One of the methods to elongate term of effectiveness is to combine two genes in host genotype. To note, it is impossible to distinguish phenotypically plants or families having one or two genes in hybrid populations; the only method is to use PCR producing DNA markers linked to each gene for resistance. It is not convenient when necessary to analyze thousands plants or especially families of crosses between carriers of certain genes. At inoculation of wheat seedlings having Lr 9, 19, 24, 47, 29 and Sp with rust population from North-West region of Russian Federation all of them were absolutely resistant, so these genes may be considered to be effective in this region. Rust population was multiplied on cv. Leningradka leaf segments placed on cotton wool wetted with solution of maleic acid hidrazide (10 mg/l) + potassium chloride (0.48 g/l) +monosubstituted sodium phosphate (0.66 g/l) and used to infect seedling of the lines constantly poured with the solution. Rare pustules were recorded on each line. Isolates from the line were combined, multiplied and used to infect the lines set. Interaction specificity was shown for carriers of certain genes for resistance and inoculums. We propose to infect seedlings of hybrid wheat populations with mixtures of isolates virulent to first gene and those virulent to second one at use of above-mentioned method to multiply rust and grow plants. Seedlings resistant to that inoculum have both genes for resistance. If we have F3 or later families it is possible to use original population without selection of virulent isolates; in this case the method allowed removing progenies of heterozygous plants. With this approach we developed lines possessing combinations of Lr9+Lr24 and Lr9+Lr47 genes

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Utilization of Jordanian durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp durum) landraces for crop improvement in dry areas

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ayed Al-Abdallat Faculty of Agriculture, The University of Jordan
Moneer Mansour, Nasab Rawashdah, Rabei Sayaydeh

Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum) landraces are rapidly disappearing from the main wheat production areas in the Fertile Crescent. Such local landraces are most likely contain geographically specific, ectopically adapted alleles or gene complexes for their harsh environments. A panel of 156 durum wheat landraces and released varieties were assembled from historical collections deposited in national and international gene banks and from a recent active collection mission from selected areas across Jordan. The panel were evaluated under field conditions in two different locations for one growing season. Data for days to heading, plant height, peduncle length, number of spikes spike length, spike weight, grains number, grains weight, number of kernels per spike and thousand-kernel weight were recorded. Results indicate the existence of a wide variation between the tested genotypes for all tested agronomical traits. For heading date, the Jordanian landrace "JDu103" was the earliest under dry environment conditions. Regarding grains weight and spike weight, the Jordanian landrace "JDu105" produced the highest mean value under humid conditions. Another landrace "JDu46" produced the longest spikes and the highest TKW mean value, while the Jordanian landrace "JDu105" produced the heaviest spikes weight mean value, while "JDu100" produced the highest grains number. For molecular analysis, total genomic DNA was extracted from each genotype and then used for SNP genotyping using Illumina iSelect wheat 90k SNP chip. Structure analysis showed that the analyzed durum wheat panel can be divided into three genetically distinct subgroups. The GWAS analysis identified 93 significant markers-traits associations for multiple traits with two QTLs located at 7A and 7B, which seems important for TKW in durum wheat under dry environments. In conclusion, the Jordanian landraces used in this study showed wide genotypic and phenotypic variability, which can be considered by plant breeders for their future use in breeding programs.

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Impact of Monsanto's Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Program

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Edward Runge AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University
David Baltensperger

Monsanto, through the MBBIScholars Program, has invested $13 million over an 8 year period for training rice and wheat breeders from around the World. The Judging Panel for MBBISP selected 89 Scholars from 432 applicants. The selected scholars were from 30 different countries. Scholars selected included 35 young ladies and 54 young men, 37 are in rice breeding and 52 in wheat breeding. Currently 28 Scholars are still completing their PhD programs (As of 8/8/2017). This past year Monsanto established the "Ted Crosbie Monsanto Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Impact Award" to begin recognizing Scholar contributions. To be eligible for the "Ted Crosbie MBBIScholars Impact Award," scholars must have received their PhD and must apply for the award. Bhoja Basnet, selected as an MBBIScholar in 2009 who is now in charge of CIMMYT's Hybrid Wheat Breeding program, was selected to receive the "Ted Crosbie Monsanto Beachell-Borlaug Scholars Program Impact Award" this year. Scholar contributions are in wheat and rice breeding as well as in other crops. Hopefully the Ted Crosbie MBBIScholars Impact Award will continue to recognize accomplishments of Scholars into the future. MBBIScholars are making an impact and we look forward to recognize their career contributions. Employment of Scholars post PhD will be reviewed.

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