All BGRI Abstracts

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Utilization of Jordanian durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp durum) landraces for crop improvement in dry areas

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ayed Al-Abdallat Faculty of Agriculture, The University of Jordan
Moneer Mansour, Nasab Rawashdah, Rabei Sayaydeh

Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum) landraces are rapidly disappearing from the main wheat production areas in the Fertile Crescent. Such local landraces are most likely contain geographically specific, ectopically adapted alleles or gene complexes for their harsh environments. A panel of 156 durum wheat landraces and released varieties were assembled from historical collections deposited in national and international gene banks and from a recent active collection mission from selected areas across Jordan. The panel were evaluated under field conditions in two different locations for one growing season. Data for days to heading, plant height, peduncle length, number of spikes spike length, spike weight, grains number, grains weight, number of kernels per spike and thousand-kernel weight were recorded. Results indicate the existence of a wide variation between the tested genotypes for all tested agronomical traits. For heading date, the Jordanian landrace "JDu103" was the earliest under dry environment conditions. Regarding grains weight and spike weight, the Jordanian landrace "JDu105" produced the highest mean value under humid conditions. Another landrace "JDu46" produced the longest spikes and the highest TKW mean value, while the Jordanian landrace "JDu105" produced the heaviest spikes weight mean value, while "JDu100" produced the highest grains number. For molecular analysis, total genomic DNA was extracted from each genotype and then used for SNP genotyping using Illumina iSelect wheat 90k SNP chip. Structure analysis showed that the analyzed durum wheat panel can be divided into three genetically distinct subgroups. The GWAS analysis identified 93 significant markers-traits associations for multiple traits with two QTLs located at 7A and 7B, which seems important for TKW in durum wheat under dry environments. In conclusion, the Jordanian landraces used in this study showed wide genotypic and phenotypic variability, which can be considered by plant breeders for their future use in breeding programs.

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Towards a public breeding decision support system: Data analysis and management activities in CIMMYT's Global Wheat Program

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Umesh Rosyara CIMMYT
Rosemary,Shrestha, Kate, Dreher, Victor, Jun Ulat, Luis A., Pubela Luna, Susanne, Dresigacker, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Global Wheat Program of CIMMYT is one of the largest public breeding programs in the world consisting of millions of lines/ genotypes derived from thousands of crosses evaluated under using a shuttle breeding cycle and multi-environment testing. The germplasm is phenotyped for conventional (such as yield and grain quality) as well as non-conventional traits (physiological traits) in field and greenhouse conditions. The breeding germplasm is also screened with genome-wide markers (using Illumina SNP array, genotyping-by-sequencing, or DArTseq platforms) and/or multiple gene/QTL region-specific molecular markers (using KASP platform). All genotyped samples are registered in the "DNA SampleTracker," a software system for tracking DNA samples developed at CIMMYT. In collaboration with High Throughput Genotyping Platform project, the plant sample and data collection methods are optimized. Meanwhile, the extensive wheat genealogies and phenotypic information have been maintained in the International Wheat Information System and will be transferred to a new Enterprise Breeding System. Furthermore, several bioinformatics/statistical genetics methods with the objectives of gene discovery and genomic prediction have been developed and utilized for optimizing genomics-assisted selection. The wheat team is a member of "Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII)" which aims to develop and implement genomic data management systems to enhance the capacity of breeding programs. Under this initiative, a new genomics database has been built and a pilot wheat version is being tested at CIMMYT. Several decision support tools are also under collaborative development, such as a Genomic Selection Pipeline based on Galaxy, Flapjack-based F1/line verification, and marker assisted backcrossing tools. Additional tools are envisioned for the future including a Cross-Assistor and Selection-Assistor. The ultimate aim is to seamlessly connect the genomic database, phenotypic database, and decision support tools to support the breeding selection process and to lead to the development of cultivars with increased rates of genetic gain.

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Current work on rusts, blight and blast on wheat in Bangladesh

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Naresh Barma Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Paritosh Malaker, Mostofa Reza, Abdul Hakim, Krishna Roy, Rabiul Islam, Thakur Prashad Tiwari, Pawan Kumar Singh, Arun Kumar Joshi

The major diseases of wheat in Bangladesh are leaf blight and leaf rust. Yellow rust occurs occasionally with sporadic infection in the northern parts whereas stem rust was observed only in 2014. So far the country is free of Pgt race Ug99. Wheat blast, a devastating head disease, was first reported in 2016. Currently, about 65% of the wheat area in Bangladesh is covered by leaf rust resistant varieties and about 30% of the area is covered by Ug99 resistant varieties. Surveillance and monitoring of diseases is conducted regularly. In 2017, 102 sites were surveyed of which 52% had leaf rust infection. The data were uploaded to the Wheat Rust Tool Box. A separate surveillance and monitoring of wheat blast was conducted on 421 farmers? fields in 24 districts. Different levels of blast incidence were recorded in 77 fields. The Wheat Research Centre in Bangladesh works with CIMMYT and BGRI to develop high yielding rust resistant varieties. This includes screening for response to Ug99 at KALRO, Kenya. However, the current major concern of wheat is wheat blast. The popular variety BARI Gom 26 is highly susceptible to this disease and no current cultivar in Bangladesh carries an acceptable level of resistance to blast. During 2016-17, 20 varieties and advanced lines from Bangladesh and 80 from CIMMYT Mexico, were evaluated. One elite breeding line, BAW 1260, showed resistance (<10% severity) in multiple environment tests and is also resistant to leaf blight and stem rust. This line carries the 2NS translocation from Aegilops ventricosa and will be released soon for commercial cultivation. Pre-release seed multiplication is already underway for rapid dissemination. Among recently released wheat varieties BARI Gom 30 and BARI Gom 32 are moderately tolerant to blast and are being promoted for wider adoption by farmers.

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Marker assisted backcross breeding for incorporation of rust resistance in Indian wheat varieties

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Chandra Nath Mishra ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal
Satish Kumar, Rekha Malik, Garima Singhroha, Vinod Tiwari, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Breeding rust resistant cultivars using conventional methods is time-consuming, complex and slow, but molecular markers offer a rapid alternative for developing cultivars with improved disease resistance. Three wheat cultivars, DBW88, DBW107, and DBW110, from different production zones were used as recipients for incorporation of resistance genes using a marker-assisted backcross (MAB) breeding approach. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr32 is being incorporated into all the three varieties, stripe rust resistance gene Yr15 is being incorporated into DBW88 and DBW107, and stem rust resistance gene Sr26 is being added to variety DBW110. Lines PBW703 (Yr15), FLW15 (Lr32) and Avocet (Sr26) were used as donors. Six cross combinations viz., DBW88/PBW703, DBW107/PBW703, DBW88/FLW15, DBW107/FLW15, DBW110/FLW15 and DBW110/Sr26 were made at Karnal during 2015-16 and the crosses were grown at IIWBR-RS, Dalang Maidan for backcrossing. BC1F1 plants were raised at Karnal during 2016-17. Both foreground and background selections were practiced in each combination. SSR markers gwm264 and barc135 were used for foreground selection of Lr32, marker barc8 was used for selection of Yr15, and markers Sr26#43 and BE518379 were used to detect presence and absence of Sr26. From 90 to 127 polymorphic SSR markers chosen for each cross from an initial set of 800 screened on the parents are being used for background selection.

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Incidence and severity of rust diseases in Novosibirsk region, Western Siberia, Russia

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ekaterina Skolotneva The Federal Research Center Institute of Cytology and Genetics, The Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Vyacheslav Piskarev, Irina Leonova, Ekaterina Bukatich, Elena Salina

Stem and leaf rusts affect the winter and spring wheat in the Novosibirsk region. During 2008-2017 leaf rust incidence was generally moderate, from 20 to 40%. A leaf rust outbreak occurred in 2015 when incidence increased up to 80%. Leaf rust severity on the 'Thatcher' NILs ranged from immune or resistant to highly susceptible host response with maximum severity of 90S. Lines carrying genes Lr17, Lr18, Lr24, Lr29, Lr35, Lr37, Lr44, and LrW remained almost free of infection for the whole time of inspection. Genes Lr12, Lr13, Lr28, Lr34, and Lr38 exhibited moderate resistance but they did not provide sufficient level of resistance in favorable conditions. Since race-specific genes Lr24 and Lr29 are still effective in the neighboring Novosibirsk and Omsk regions, they might be recommended for breeding purposes in Western Siberia.
In 2016 stem rust was more prevalent and widespread in the region than ever before. Disease incidence ranged between 4.5 - 60% with high severity up to 80S in six fields from seven observed locations. The 4th ISRTN and varieties carrying Sr31 of West Siberian germplasm were assessed in field trials to monitor the virulence of the local population. There was no virulence to Sr9b, Sr9e, Sr20, Sr28, Sr29, Sr33, Sr39, Sr40, SrWld, Sr2 complex. Possible virulence to Sr6, Sr11, Sr12, Sr13, Sr17, Sr24, Sr25, Sr30, Sr31, Sr35, Sr38, Sr44, Sr57 was observed with low frequency. Entries genotyped for gene Sr31 were scored as MS and S. However, follow up race analysis work is needed to determine the actual stem rust races present and confirm the suspected possible observed virulence on Sr31.

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Evaluation of Ethiopian wheat germplasm for resistance to four virulent Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici races

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Bekele Hundie Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research
Bedada Girma, Endale Hailu, Fikrte Yirga, Bekele Abeyo, Gordon Cisar, Gina Brown-Guedira, Erena Edae, Pablo Olivera, Matthew Rouse

In Ethiopia, breeding resistant wheat varieties is a priority for wheat rust management although new virulent rust races have periodically resulted in losses of R-genes, epidemic outbreaks, and yield losses of up to 100%. During 2014 and 2015, 160 wheat varieties and lines including five checks and 12 differential lines with known resistance genes were evaluated against four stem rust pathogen races at both seedling and adult plant stages. In the field at Kulumsa, Ethiopia, the lines were evaluated in four separate nurseries in an augmented design where each nursery was inoculated with a different Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race: TTKSK, TKTTF, TRTTF, and JRCQC. Kingbird, a check variety, displayed low average Area Under the Disease Progress Curve (AUDPC) (67 to 238) and Average Coefficient of Infection (ACI) (1.1 to 9.7) in response to the four races. Effect of lines possessing Sr24+Sr36 and Sr31+Sr36 resistance genes on rust development was comparable to Kingbird or even better. Likewise, 48, 34, 19 and 28 varieties and lines had lower or comparable AUDPC for TTKSK, TKTTF, TRTTF and JRCQC compared to Kingbird. Commercial bread wheat varieties Shorima, Huluka, Hogana, and advanced lines CIMMYT 14, ETBW7058, ETBW7101 and ETBW7258 for which Sr24/Lr24 was postulated, possessed AUDPC and ACI lower than Kingbird. However, all these lines possessed susceptible or intermediate seedling reactions to Sr24-virulent race TTKTT from Kenya at the seedling stage. CIMMYT 18 showed susceptibility to 3 races at seedling stage, but lower AUDPC and ACI than the checks except Kingbird, indicating adult plant resistance. However, this adult plant resistance was marginal in effect to race TKTTF. Resistance genes Sr2, Sr57/Lr34, Sr24/Lr24, Sr25/Lr19, Sr38/Lr37 and SrTmp were postulated at various frequencies in this germplasm. Seedling and adult plant resistance sources identified can be used for rust resistance breeding in Ethiopia.

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Contribution of peduncle traits to grain yield under terminal drought and compensatory effect of stem reserve mobilization

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Dejan Dodig Maize Research Institute Zemun Polje
Dragana Ranćić, Vesna Kandić, Biljana Vucelić-Radović, Jasna, Savić, Miroslav Zorć

When environmental stress develops during reproductive phases of growth, wheat plants have to rely increasingly on remobilisation of previously stored assimilates to maintain grain filling. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of several peduncle (the uppermost stem internode) morpho-anatomical and biochemical traits on grain weight, and to assess the contribution of the peduncle water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) reserves shortly after anthesis to its variation. In 2-year field trials, 61 wheat genotypes were used (27 F4:5 families, 17 parents used for the crosses and the 17 current best standards) comparing intact control plants (CP) with plants that were defoliated (DP) by cutting off all leaf blades 10 days after anthesis to simulate terminal stress. Estimated contributions of peduncle assimilate reserves to grain weight/spike were from 0.06 to 0.31% and from 0.11 to 0.45% in CP and DP plants, respectively. High peduncle reserve mobilization efficiency, a longer exposed part of the peduncle and larger peduncle storage capacity (through higher parenchyma and/or lower lignified area) were of specific benefit for maintaining grain weight in defoliated plants. There was a large difference in compensation of grain yield loss by dry matter remobilization within studied genotypes (in average 1.2-36.1%). Although compensation of yield loss might be improved through breeding process (our F4:5 families had slightly higher mean compensation effect than their parents under moderate stress), it does not mitigate the effect of post-anthesis drought in great extent (up to 38.4%).

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High yielding bread wheat cultivar Alaa with potential to retard rust spread in rain-fed and irrigated zones of Iraq

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Emad Al-Maaroof Sulaimani University,IKR, Iraq

Rusts continue to cause significant losses in grain yield of wheat in Iraq. Substitution of susceptible cultivars with resistant ones is an important step in reducing the vulnerability of the wheat crop. The present study represents a breeding program to develop high yielding bread wheat cultivars with resistance to brown rust and yellow rust. The performance of 265 spring wheat genotypes representing an international bread wheat-screening nursery from CIMMYT were evaluated in different agro-ecological zones in comparison with local commercial cultivars. Adult plant stage screening of the materials for brown rust and yellow rust reaction under inoculated conditions for three successive seasons identified 29 resistant and 59 moderately resistant genotypes, and 79 genotypes out-yielded the local cultivars. The selected lines were comprehensively evaluated for grain yield potential and disease response in different locations and agro-systems. Among 13 genotypes line 172 was selected for higher grain yield than local commercial cultivars in the presence and absence of both diseases. Mean coefficients of infection on line 172 were 0.57 and 5.35 to brown rust and yellow rust, respectively. It was also moderately resistant to common bunt. Yield potential of the new cv. Alaa was 9-20% higher than the commercial local cultivars Araz, Tamuz 2 and Adana. Alaa was registered and released by the National Committee for Registration and Release of Agricultural Cultivars according to order no. 39, 30/10/2017 as a new cultivar with high yield potential and resistance to brown rust and yellow rust. Great emphasis was made on multiplication and delivery of seeds to farmers. Grain yield potential of Alaa on a farm scale is 3,372 Kg/ha under rain-fed conditions and 5,024 Kg/ha under irrigated conditions.

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Impact of Monsanto's Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Program

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Edward Runge AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University
David Baltensperger

Monsanto, through the MBBIScholars Program, has invested $13 million over an 8 year period for training rice and wheat breeders from around the World. The Judging Panel for MBBISP selected 89 Scholars from 432 applicants. The selected scholars were from 30 different countries. Scholars selected included 35 young ladies and 54 young men, 37 are in rice breeding and 52 in wheat breeding. Currently 28 Scholars are still completing their PhD programs (As of 8/8/2017). This past year Monsanto established the "Ted Crosbie Monsanto Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Impact Award" to begin recognizing Scholar contributions. To be eligible for the "Ted Crosbie MBBIScholars Impact Award," scholars must have received their PhD and must apply for the award. Bhoja Basnet, selected as an MBBIScholar in 2009 who is now in charge of CIMMYT's Hybrid Wheat Breeding program, was selected to receive the "Ted Crosbie Monsanto Beachell-Borlaug Scholars Program Impact Award" this year. Scholar contributions are in wheat and rice breeding as well as in other crops. Hopefully the Ted Crosbie MBBIScholars Impact Award will continue to recognize accomplishments of Scholars into the future. MBBIScholars are making an impact and we look forward to recognize their career contributions. Employment of Scholars post PhD will be reviewed.

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Transgenerational response to high temperature stress in Indian bread wheat cultivar HD2967

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sharmistha Barthakur ICAR NRC Plant Biotechnology
Sushma Khomdram

The present challenge in wheat breeding is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of heat stress response and thermotolerance in detail for future applications. Several reports indicate the ability of plants to maintain a memory of stress exposure throughout their ontogenesis and even transmit it faithfully to the following generation. Here, three diverse genotypes of wheat viz., HD2967, WR544 and C306 were used for thermotolerance assays. The genotype HD2967 was able to withstand heat stress regimes (37?C and 42?C, 2 hours). Harvested seeds were sown and further raised for two consecutive years and phonotypical data evaluated in natural field condition by exposing to heat stress during generative stages in a heat trap chamber. Maximum tiller numbers and flag leaf length were noticed in second generation plant of 37?C heat exposure whereas flag leaf width in second generation 42?C heat exposure relative to the untreated plant. Auricle length showed no difference but plant height was notably increased in the second year in all the heat exposed plants. In grain yield index, ear head length was greater in the second year and fluctuations in grain number was noticed among the heat treated plant with more yields in 42?C and 42?C HTHT in the second year. IRGA and SPAD recording showed high photosynthesis and chlorophyll content in 37?C HTHT. High modulation of transcripts of several genes involved in DNA methylation and heat stress were also observed. The domino effect of heat stress in earlier generation, in this transgenerational analysis, points towards a probable epigenetic effect. Further studies are in progress to confirm and clarify the mechanisms for future manipulation in breeding for thermotolerance.

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